Talk:Apocrypha

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Martin Luther's Definition[edit]

From reading the article, I get the impression that the term seems to have a negative connotation in most historical contexts. Wouldn't it be worthwhile adding Martin Luther's pointed yet somewhat balanced definition "Apocrypha: These Books Are Not Held Equal to the Scriptures, but Are Useful and Good to Read" (quoted from here)? --Anna (talk) 22:36, 19 May 2011 (UTC)

The general term is usually applied to the books that the Protestant Christian Church considered useful but not divinely inspired. Is the term really restricted to "the Protestant Church"? Which Protestant church? Why is the sentence in past tense? What do you call texts that didn't make it into the Catholic (etc.) canon?--88.73.0.195 (talk) 02:43, 21 May 2011 (UTC)

You may want to check this website is more detail about the truth of Apocrypha: http://www.thelostbooks.com/bookapocintro.htm — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.5.220.10 (talk) 09:45, 5 April 2012 (UTC)

Apocrapha, King James Version[edit]

I have seen references that say that King James First's translaters had translated the Apocrapha and that it was included in early translations of the Holy Bible. I wish to have his translation recognized for what it is. I plan to expand on this quite soon.

- RCNesland ---- — Preceding unsigned comment added by RCNesland (talkcontribs) 04:41, 17 July 2012 (UTC)

This article needs a re-write by experts[edit]

I came to this page because I wanted to understand apocrypha better, and before the end of the introduction, I was assaulted by glaring untruths. I refer specifically to this part:

"The general term is usually applied to the books in the Roman Catholic Bible or the Christian old testament, and the Eastern Orthodox Bible, but not the Protestant Bible on their claim that it is not God's word. So, for Protestant denominations, it is misleading in this sense to refer to the Gospel according to the Hebrews or even the Gnostic writings as apocryphal, because they would not be classified in the same category: by Protestants they would be classified as a heretical subset of antilegomenae..."

I grew up in a protestant church, and they never referred to apocrypha as "not God's word" or "heretical". On the contrary, members of my church actively sought to read obscure apocryphal texts in order to more fully understand their religion. Another commenter here was asking "which protestant church?" and that indeed is a good question since there are so many that are so different. (For example, the Anglican church, which is protestant, is basically the same as the Roman Catholic church. Not the same as the protestants who go to Megachurches in America.)

To boot, the quoted section above is horribly written. This article badly needs a re-write by experts.Guypersonson (talk) 23:15, 3 February 2013 (UTC)

I have attempted a rewrite of the introductory material only correcting some blatant errors and WP:POV. It's a step closer. Evenssteven (talk) 05:28, 25 May 2013 (UTC)
There is a discussion on possible merger from Biblical apocrypha at Wikipedia_talk:WikiProject_Bible#Should_article_Biblical_apocrypha_be_renamed_Apocrypha?Fayenatic London 13:46, 1 June 2013 (UTC)

"out of date" tag[edit]

User DGG added an "out of date" tag to this article on Dec 12, 2012 which stands to this day. However he did not offer an explanation or reason why he did and what he thought was out of date. Does the tag still apply or can it be removed? I should think, that, generally, when you add a maintenance tag to an article it would be appropriate to explain on the discussion page. I've asked him on his discussion page and I hope he comes back here to discuss the matter. ;) --Maxl (talk) 09:51, 4 September 2014 (UTC)

I highly recommend messaging the editor before proceeding -- JudeccaXIII (talk) 13:56, 4 September 2014 (UTC)
which I did, see my text! ;) --Maxl (talk) 14:35, 4 September 2014 (UTC)
(I am copying this from my talk page.) What was out of date was the use of only 19th and early 20th century sources. They are reliable only in a historical sense, for there have been enormous changes in our knowledge of the period since then for the Christian and Jewish apocrypha. Speaking only of data then unknown, the Dead Sea Scrolls, which have contents very relevant to both of these, had not even been discovered. The only use them, or of studies based on them, is in the article is as a see: reference. And these are only the best known: there have been other major new discoveries of documents from the period. Interpretations are not the same either. There has been over a century of work by hundreds of scholars of various persuasions since those older encyclopedic sources were written--perhaps the best know are Frank Moore Cross and Cross andElaine Pagels. There haas also much many recent books of the formation of both the Christian and Jewish canons. I assume there has been similar increases in knowledge of other religion's texts, though I have no knowledge about this. There was also a failure of attribution: it was not specified in the text what parts were copied from which particular of these older source=-nor is it even clear from the edit history.
I see the current version is very little better including the lack of use of texts found in the 20th century (though two of them were at least mentioned, & one general book was added as a source in two small places)-- and the continuing failure of attribution.
I greatly regret not having had time to work on this & I appreciate being reminded. A great deal could be done merely summarizing the more specialized articles, which are substantially more up-to-date DGG ( talk ) 14:53, 4 September 2014 (UTC)
I see your point. There are two main sources which date to 1911 and 1913. Of course a lot of new facts may have surfaced since then, one of them the find of the Dead Sea scrolls, as you said. You're right, new sources need to be found for the article. --Maxl (talk) 17:18, 4 September 2014 (UTC)