Talk:Appalachian Spring

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Classical music
WikiProject icon Appalachian Spring is within the scope of WikiProject Classical music, which aims to improve, expand, copy edit, and maintain all articles related to classical music, that are not covered by other classical music related projects. Please read the guidelines for writing and maintaining articles. To participate, you can edit this article or visit the project page for more details.
 
WikiProject United States (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject United States, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of topics relating to the United States of America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the ongoing discussions.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Dance / Ballet (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Dance, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Dance and Dance-related topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Ballet (marked as Mid-importance).
 
WikiProject Appalachia (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is part of WikiProject Appalachia, a WikiProject dedicated to developing articles concerning Appalachia and the Appalachian Mountains. If you would like to participate, go to the project page to see a list of related articles needing attention.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the quality scale.
 

Dance vs Music[edit]

This article should probably be cut into two, or at least have two distinct sections: information concerning the dance by Martha Graham, and information concerning the musical score by Copland. As it currently stands, the article switches back and forth between the two (the dance and the score) and is, I think, confusing as a result. J. Van Meter 02:18, 23 October 2005 (UTC)

I'd second that. I've just turned to the article hoping to have some information about the Martha Graham ballet (the whole reason the score exists in the first place) only to find next to nothing, and the article going on as if the (to my mind overbloated) orchestral version was its most important incarnation and sole justification. If only I had some info to hand I'd try to do something about it. Anyone else out there? Alfietucker (talk) 19:30, 7 January 2012 (UTC)

Grammar?[edit]

This is grammatically incorrect:

The melody I borrowed and used almost literally, is called "Simple Gifts."

It should be

The melody I borrowed and used almost literally is called "Simple Gifts."

or

The melody I borrowed, and used almost literally, is called "Simple Gifts."

Is it written sic, or is it simply a misquote?

mysterd429 11/15/05 11:30 PM EST
And two years later this is still not resolved? It's unclear from the text whether Copland was describing it verbally or in print. If it was in an interview, punctuation is somewhat subjective, and I think we can correct it here (since the complaint regards misuse of punctuation, not syntax). If the description was in writing (say, in his memoirs, published commentary, etc.) I think we need to tag it "sic", or paraphrase. It is not clear at any point whether the descriptions are actual quotes anyway. Hell, I'm just going to fix the comma. If the material presented was a quote, it needs to be formatted properly to reflect this. 12.22.250.4 17:50, 22 August 2007 (UTC)

Type of dance[edit]

Appalachian Spring is not a ballet. It is a modern dance, which is very different. Martha Graham is one of THE names in the early history of modern dance.

Tasedjebbast 06:28, 24 April 2007 (UTC)Tasedjebbast

I believe you are splitting hairs. Appalachian Spring has always been described as a ballet, even by Copland himself (even in its earliest draft stages, he called it a ballet). Regardless of whether it's a "ballet" or "modern dance", when the creator of the piece and 99.9% of the musical world call it a "ballet", it's a ballet. The choreography follows after the score, so regardless of what form of dance Graham created for it, it takes the name of the score. If you can quote a single reference that states AS is a modern dance score and not a ballet, present it and change the article. 12.22.250.4 17:59, 22 August 2007 (UTC)
I offer no opinion as to whether AP is in fact a ballet or a "modern dance." However I mention as point of interest that this question does come up in one of Copland's letters, to Harold Spivacke, dated November 13, 1944, which refers to some tension between "the balletomanes and the modern dance enthusiasts," concerning AP. So the question raised here is perhaps not so quite so new. ThaddeusFrye (talk) 00:38, 3 February 2009 (UTC)
Is there even such a thing as "A modern dance"? IMO, modern dance is a style, not a denomination for a stage piece. Whereas yoou can, of course, say "a ballet". -- 14:02, 10 March 2010 (UTC)


Meaning of Spring in title of this work[edit]

I have always understood that "spring" in the title of Appalachian Spring does not refer to the season, but refers to an expanse of water, similar to a brook, rill or stream.This article hardly clarifies this and if anything, goes on to mislead people. ACEOREVIVED (talk) 17:25, 16 December 2010 (UTC)

Lord of the Dance[edit]

Should this article not include reference to the fact that it has been influenced by the hymn Lord of the Dance?ACEOREVIVED (talk) 15:18, 6 June 2013 (UTC)

It already does (see Shaker Melody section). You've got your chronology backwards, though. Lord of the Dance was written in 1963 borrowing from the old Shaker Melody Simple Gifts from 1848. Appalachian Spring was written in 1944 and also uses the Simple Gifts melody. The could be no direct influence of Lord of the Dance on Appalachian Spring because it was written nineteen years later.DavidRF (talk) 17:58, 6 June 2013 (UTC)