Talk:Arctium

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Gobou[edit]

I redirected Gobou to this page because, so far as I can tell, it's just the Japanese word for the same plant. A better botanist than I might have something clearer to say on the subject.

Arctium lappa is defined as Gobo in Japanese page as well, so I think it is alright. Revth 15:02, 4 Oct 2004 (UTC)

usage in Canadian Maritimes[edit]

I had been led to believe the word "Burdock" was unique the Maritime provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and PEI.

Canadians in other provinces call them "Burrs".

Picture[edit]

There's a good free picture from the Probert Encyclopaedia located here.

Odd trait[edit]

It will produce flowers and set seeds after its leaves have been killed by a defoliant

Burdock is able to produce stems, flowers, and seeds after its foliage has been killed by a defoliant. PixOnTrax 06:50, 17 February 2007 (UTC)

This plant is located about six feet (2 m) away from railroad tracks. Workers sprayed a defoliant along the railroad's right-of-way to keep it free of weeds and young trees. PixOnTrax 07:10, 17 February 2007 (UTC)
This photograph was made about 3 months after the defoliant had been applied to the plant. PixOnTrax 07:20, 17 February 2007 (UTC)
Had the plant not been defoliated it would have produced about 10 times more seeds than those shown in the photograph. Setting flowers and producing seeds after the foliage has been killed is an odd trait possessed by burdock. PixOnTrax 07:40, 17 February 2007 (UTC)

Photos if you'd like them[edit]

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cpurrin1/224594284/in/set-1755337/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/cpurrin1/389633647/in/set-1755337/

The above photos are licensed for non-commercial use only, and cannot be used on Wikipedia. Wikipedia can only accept images that are free licensed. TomTheHand 12:16, 23 April 2007 (UTC)

Safety[edit]

Under sction safety we have this:

Do not gather burdock in the wild unless you know what you are doing.

What is the problem with wild Burdock roots? Is this even true? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.89.166.51 (talk) 14:45, August 26, 2007 (UTC)

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Move "Greater burdock" stuff to its article[edit]

Since this article has evolved into a general overview of the Arctium genus, most of the information that is specific to the Greater burdock (Japanese gobo), such as culinary uses, should be moved to that article. --Jorge Stolfi (talk) 18:34, 10 May 2009 (UTC)

Agree, but I am removing the merger templates because there should not be just one article. Nadiatalent (talk) 13:17, 10 December 2011 (UTC)

Copyright violation[edit]

I removed text that was copy and pasted from the University of Maryland Medical Center. The text that was copied is part of the first paragraph under the Overview section. -- Joel M.Chat ✐ 18:53, 21 September 2010 (UTC)

That may well have been taken from Wikipedia originally. The safety section (which I just removed) was, in an earlier version, verbatim with text on the UMMC website. I'd be willing to add the safety section back if I was sure I could cite UMMC as the original source, but I'm very skeptical of the claim that Atropa is uniquely likely to be confused with burdock, and am more inclined to think it originated in Wikipedia than UMMC. Copyvio's can go both ways; Wikipedia is often copied these days.Plantdrew (talk) 00:16, 31 October 2012 (UTC)

Removing Safety section[edit]

I'm removing the Safety section, which reads:

"Because the roots of burdock resemble those of deadly nightshade (also known as belladonna or Atropa belladonna), which is extremely poisonous, it is sometimes cautioned as a safety risk. Given that the plants above ground are readily distinguishable, and chiefly because their habitats rarely overlap, it is unlikely that the toxic plant's root should be found beneath the foliage of the edible one's. However, positive identification is a necessary precondition to the consumption of any wild plant."

Accidentally getting the roots of the wrong plant is certainly a risk when harvesting roots. Lots of roots look alike, but there is no reason to think (and no reference to support) Atropa roots (specifically) being often confused with burdock. This looks like a piece of Wikilore that escaped into the wild; I can't find any mention of belladonna being confused with burdock when doing a blog search on Google prior to 2007 (when the safety section was added), but it's all over the blogosphere now. I did find anecdotes about Datura poisonings when people thought they were consuming burdock ([1][2]), and am wondering if a garbled version of one of those poisonings is the source of the apparent myth (Datura is in the deadly nightshade family).Plantdrew (talk) 23:59, 30 October 2012 (UTC)