Talk:Ardnamurchan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject UK geography (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article falls within the scope of WikiProject UK geography, a user-group dedicated to building a comprehensive and quality guide to places in the United Kingdom on Wikipedia. If you wish to participate, share ideas or merely get tips you can join us at the project page where there are resources, to do lists and guidelines on how to write about settlements.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Scotland (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Scotland, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Scotland and Scotland-related topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

"The whole north western corner of Ardnamurchan is a large "Caldera" which is a crater left behind by a collapsed volcano and makes Ardnamurchan popular with geologists where the tapping of geology hammers to obtain samples can often be heard in the summer months."
Well, you could describe it that way, if you hadn't read any work on the area published in the last 30 or so years. It's a volcanic complex, that's for sure, but claiming that it is the substructure of a caldera (or as described in decades gone by, a "cauldron subsidence", which is not quite the same thing) is considerably more contentious. I'll edit appropriately.
The tinkle of hammer on rock is not so common - as a geologist, I didn't even take my hammer on my recent visit. I don't know the precise status of the peninsula, but it's quite likely to be in some degrees a geological conservation zone. I figured that any samples that were worth taking would be available from loose debris in a quarry, or as stones on the shore. The area is popular for student training, but such training these days involves geoconservation as well as rock identification.
Aidan Karley, FGS 13:31, 17 January 2009 (UTC)