Talk:Ares

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Puppy sacrifice?[edit]

"and where youths each sacrificed a puppy to Enyalios before engaging in the all-out ritual fighting at the Phoebaeum" Really? 99.65.12.194 (talk) 22:11, 3 February 2010 (UTC)

Yes, really. Read the footnote. Look up Pausanias, whom you've never heard of. Log in, and pull yourself together.--Wetman (talk) 10:52, 4 February 2010 (UTC)
Impressively condescending! Well done, hopefully that user will never contribute to wikipedia again. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.196.184.35 (talk) 10:49, 20 February 2010 (UTC)
Indeed, the fact wetman is an ambassador and that this non controvisal article is locked gives more credence to the argument that Wikipedia is a joke operating under a false guise of egalitarianism. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.190.86.13 (talk) 18:06, 13 July 2013 (UTC)

Symbol of Ares is a bloody spear not a quadriga or what ever its called —Preceding unsigned comment added by 207.6.189.208 (talk) 03:05, 17 March 2011 (UTC)

ares caught[edit]

[[File:ares was caught with athrodite by her husband hephaestus, god of metal and smith, who caught them in a net and called all of olympus to scorn and laugh at them. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.194.102.77 (talk) 23:10, 22 April 2010 (UTC)

Yes.... your point? Hermes13 (talk) 15:14, 25 April 2010 (UTC) Hermes13]][[File:Example.jpg--Aresofwar (talk) 07:49, 8 July 2010 (UTC)Italic text]]

Keen birds?[edit]

The article contained the following sentence:

His keen and sacred birds were the woodpecker, the eagle owl and, especially in the south, the vulture.

The wikilink leads to a disambiguation page that contains mainly proper names and no link to an article that would explain the usage of the word in this context. Neither google nor my dictionaries turned up anything helpful either, so I reduced it to just "sacred birds".—Graf Bobby (talk) 11:09, 4 July 2010 (UTC)

I also wonder whether the woodpecker is ever identified in a Greek source as the bird of Ares; this seems to be an Italic tradition pertaining to Mars (see Mars (mythology)#Sacred animals). Cynwolfe (talk) 16:59, 15 December 2010 (UTC)

birth[edit]

This source claims that Ares was born of Hera; in fact, the source cited is Ovid's Fasti, in reference to the Roman god Mars, and it isn't entirely clear that Ovid didn't just make it up. It can't be assumed that everything true of Mars is also true of Ares. I've seen this repeated elsewhere, but Hesiod states in the Theogony that Ares is the only son of Zeus and Hera. Mythology handbooks (and evidently some scholars) are often quite sloppy in distinguishing between Greek gods and their Roman counterparts. Cynwolfe (talk) 15:58, 15 December 2010 (UTC)

I corrected this. Not sure how to handle the existence of scholarly sources that make plain factual errors. Cynwolfe (talk) 17:01, 15 December 2010 (UTC)
If it is a genuinely reputable source, note what it said in the footnore, and why it's wrong; it may save some reader a headache. Septentrionalis PMAnderson 19:15, 28 February 2011 (UTC)

silhouetted Canope Villa Adriana image[edit]

The image associated with this Ares page has undergone several revisions: desaturation, yellow tint removal, now there is a silhouetted version which I think comes across as much more striking in addition to not having a distracting background. Any thoughts? Link: File:Ares Canope Villa Adriana b.jpg — Preceding unsigned comment added by Noh Chung (talkcontribs) 20:52, 20 February 2011 (UTC)

I prefer the full-length image without a background. If the background contributed to an understanding of the iconography or significance of Ares, it would be useful; otherwise, to me it's just visually distracting. I don't see the point of a cropped image, if the purpose is to represent the iconography of Ares. The full-length version shows his shield, and the drilled right hand where a wooden spear would've been inserted. For those interested in working toward a consensus on which image to use, let me post a gallery here to show what Noh Chung's referring to. I don't feel strongly that this sculpture is the best top illustration for the article; my opinion is that of the versions, the full-length, dropped-background is strongest. Cynwolfe (talk) 13:52, 28 February 2011 (UTC)
Great work Cynwolfe I am in complete agreement with you. I also much prefer the full-length image without a background (titled "Ares Canope Villa Adriana b.jpg"). This was the image here for several months but then someone reverted back to the full length version with a washed out tacky distracting background. Rather than use that old full length version, and rather than offend whomever reverted back to it, I just thought the cropped version. By far in my opinion the most striking, engaging image is the silhouetted full length version.Noh Chung (talk) 01:16, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

Etymology[edit]

The article omits the best, and certainly most likely origin of the word. Hebrew ariz, terrible one. Dr.P.

Odd claims[edit]

  • The text asserts that the Athenian temple of Ares is essentially a Roman temple of Mars because it was Augustan in date. (By the same logic, Zeus Olympius is Jupiter; that temple was not only finished under Hadrian, he paid for it.)
  • Again the text claims that the Areopagus (Areios pagos) is the Hill of Ares is merely etiological myth; if so, the Oxford Classical Dictionary falls for it.

Neither is impossible; but both require sources. Septentrionalis PMAnderson 02:41, 28 February 2011 (UTC)

A few weeks ago I requested citations for the claims that Ares represents "righteous indignation" and "integrity." My {{cn}} in both cases has been deleted without explanation, but I don't see the word "integrity" anywhere else in the article. "Righteous indignation" is perhaps based on the Homeric Hymn's invocatory "leader of righteous men" — but why does the intro say both? Ares as an embodiment of all these virtues is contrary to the impression one gets from the ancient Greek sources themselves, or certainly Homer and the lyric poets, and is not supported by the article. Cynwolfe (talk) 14:10, 28 February 2011 (UTC)
Another confusion with Mars Pater, assisted by the Hymn? Mars might well deliver justice; does Ares, outside Heraclitus? Septentrionalis PMAnderson 19:18, 28 February 2011 (UTC)
  • This edit, with the in-text comment, demonstrates that the reversal was by a good soul who thinks Mars is Ares. Removing the claims, and adding that Mars and Ares are connected by interpretatio romana (only), seems justified. Septentrionalis PMAnderson 19:22, 28 February 2011 (UTC)
  • The Greek for "righteous" is dikaiotatos; this is not necessarily equivalent if the Hymn is genuine and therefore early. But if Allen is right, and it is a late Orphic work, the translation of tyrannos as "governor", even "severe governor", is misleading. Septentrionalis PMAnderson 19:48, 28 February 2011 (UTC)
The mention of the woodpecker appears to derive from Dionysius of Halicarnassus; he is again talking about Mars, using interpretatio graeca. Septentrionalis PMAnderson 01:19, 4 March 2011 (UTC)
The context in D. of H. is so specifically Italic that I'm not sure it even reaches the level of interpretatio: more like mere translation of the name. I do think these things are worth sorting out, so thank you. Cynwolfe (talk) 01:42, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

Wow[edit]

Why are there so many mistakes? Well, not any more. I fixed most all of them that I can see.

--KF5LLG (talk) 00:05, 31 July 2011 (UTC)

Really? I only saw one supposed typo you fixed, which was the transliteration Olympos instead of the anglicized Olympus, but that was in a direct quotation. I'm not sure what to do about the inconsistency that results when a source that's directly quoted transliterates a Greek word one way, and the body text goes with the most common English spelling. (Started to say that in my editing summary and accidentally hit save before I finished explaining). Cynwolfe (talk) 00:55, 31 July 2011 (UTC)

TO BE ADDED TO UNPROTECTED ARTICLE ARES[edit]

hello i was told that i could not edit this which just pisses me off... any way someone with a higher rank should add what i am about to say


Children: Anteros, Deimos, Enyalios, Eros, Harmonia, Nike, Phobos, Areopos, Alkippe, Amazones, Antiope, Askalaphos, Diomedes, Dryas, Euenos, Hippolyte, Ialmenos, Kyknos, Likymnios, Lykastos, Lykos, Melanippos, Meleagros, Molos, Nisos,Oiagros, Oinomaus, Oxylos, Parrhasios, Parthenopaios, Penthesileia, Phlegyas, Porthaon, Pylos, Remus, Romulus, Tereus, Thestios, Thrassa, Drakon Ismenian.

Ares had 40 children.

Anteros, Deimos, Enyalios, Eros, Harmonia, Nike, and Phobos were divine
Areopos, Alkippe, Amazones, Antiope, Askalaphos, Diomedes, Dryas, Euenos, Hippolyte, Ialmenos, Kyknos, Likymnios, Lykastos, Lykos, Melanippos, Meleagros, Molos, Nisos, Oiagros, Oinomaus, Oxylos, Parrhasios, Parthenopaios, Penthesileia, Phlegyas, Porthaon, Pylos, Remus, Romulus, Tereus, Thestios, and Thrassa were mortal
Drakon Ismenian is a beats


(ref: Greeks: A Great Adventure, College Study at Berry College in Gorgia) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Tom Redwood (talkcontribs) 23:26, 5 March 2013 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 11 February 2014[edit]

f One of Ares symbols is a sword. I believe that it should be listed as one of his atrebutes. It is listed as one of Mars' symbols so it should be listed as one of Ares symbols also. 24.30.77.201 (talk) 18:17, 11 February 2014 (UTC)

Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. Please note: while the Roman pantheon is based on the earlier Greek one, their respective deities are only roughly equivalent, not identical. You may be right, however, and I think it should be added if you provide a good source. Rivertorch (talk) 06:47, 13 February 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 14 February 2014[edit]

The section reading "Fear (Phobos) and Terror (Deimos) were yoked to his battle chariot.[4]" should read "His sons Fear (Phobos) and Terror (Deimos) and his sister Discord (Enyo) accompanied him on his war chariot." As written, it sounds like deimos and phobos are his horses, not his sons, and it ignores Enyo entirely. 82.40.44.97 (talk) 01:00, 14 February 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done but added that Discord might have been his lover, and/or his sister. Arjayay (talk) 18:55, 16 February 2014 (UTC)