Talk:Armor-piercing shot and shell

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Article lacks specificity[edit]

This article lacks clarity on the kind of armor that AP bullets can penetrate. For example every rifle round is capable of penetrating level IIIA and below kevlar vests, and indeed they are not rated for it. However the implied meaning is that only those few rounds cited on the page can penetrate "armor". Level III and IV armor are not vests, which most people would consider armor, but plates which can stop rifle rounds. http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/223054.pdf Pl3b3z (talk) 05:43, 12 May 2014 (UTC)


Article is not self-consistent[edit]

In the introduction it says "it remains the preferred round in tank warfare", but in the section 'Modern Day' the first sentence starts "Rarely encountered in large-caliber tank guns now".

These statements are contradictory. At least one of them is wrong. Somebody please fix. Thanks. 78.86.229.20 (talk) 11:52, 18 February 2009 (UTC)

I removed the erroneous claim that AP rounds are "rarely encountered in large-caliber tank guns now". The Modern Day section needs further cleanup (it seems to confuse the distinction between chemical and kinetic energy rounds and uses the term "ammunition" when it means "cartridges" or "small arms ammunition", among other problems). I'll update as time allows. Lexington50 (talk) 12:03, 28 February 2009 (UTC)


Modern Use[edit]

This article eroneously claimed that AP rounds are now mostly used in naval warfare, which is incorrect. Modern naval ships have little or no armor, making AP rounds redundant (it was different in the pre-missile age when gun calibre determined how hard a ship could hit). AP rounds are now mainly used in armored warfare.

Also noted the use of AP rounds as a specialized type of small arms ammunition. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Lexington50 (talkcontribs) 08:34, 28 June 2008 (UTC)

Merge notice[edit]

Merged content from Armor piercing round. See old talk page Talk:Armor piercing round Kville105125 17:46, 17 October 2007 (UTC)

Modern Day[edit]

"Contrary to what Adam thinks" - this should probably be clarified or removed, I guess. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 163.1.246.13 (talk) 15:22, 26 November 2008 (UTC)

Unrelated Articles[edit]

Teflon Coated and armor Piercing are not similar. The teflon coating that was used was to reduce rifling. It has been proven not to be armor piercing. Tank rounds that are armor piercing are called sabot rounds. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.130.168.234 (talk) 19:32, 9 February 2011 (UTC)

Agreed that Teflon Coated is a disparate topic, if for no other reason than the erroneous portrayal in films and mainstream media that Teflon provides armor-piercing capabilities. Once clarified, there is a legitimate chance that the reader will not proceed to Armor Piercing at all, because the Teflon question was resolved as being incorrect. Spawn777 (talk) 23:02, 19 March 2012 (UTC)

15" shell + cap picture available.[edit]

A good picture is available on the HMS Malaya article. The shell, hopefully disarmed, resides in the nave of Genoa Cathedral. JRPG (talk) 21:10, 19 June 2011 (UTC)