Talk:Art movement

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Untitled[edit]

Just stumbled onto this page; I've been adding things to and organizing Art styles, periods and movements. Do you think any aspects of these two pages should be moved or combined? If all of the individual pages of art movements are put in the Art history category, or an art history subcategory call art movements (and it could be tricky distinguishing between the two, I almost kind of wonder if other alphabetized lists would be needed anymore... --STLEric 03:19, 7 Aug 2004 (UTC)== Timeline ==

Could someone add a timeline of art movements using that EasyTimeliner package developed for Wikipedia?

Ethnocentric[edit]

The phrase Art movements seem to be a nearly exclusively Western art phenomenon is absurd,there are a lot of movements in other cultures,unknow in the west doesnt mean they don't exist or are less valuable--Andres rojas22 16:01, 23 March 2007 (UTC)

Excellent point. Thanks for making that point, and I'm happy to see that bit of absurdity removed. Bus stop 16:22, 23 March 2007 (UTC)

No more art movements?[edit]

The first paragraph says, in part:

"Art movements were especially important in modern art, where each consecutive movement was considered as a new avant-garde. Movements have almost entirely disappeared in contemporary art, where individualism and diversity prevail."

Do we have a source for the notion that "Movements have almost entirely disappeared in contemporary art, where individualism and diversity prevail."?

I don't doubt that this might have been said somewhere, but I think a source for that assertion would be appropriate. Bus stop (talk) 19:02, 4 December 2008 (UTC)

Also, why is Art movement a part of WikiProject Philosophy and not WikiProject Visual arts? Bus stop (talk) 19:46, 4 December 2008 (UTC)
Good point, I tagged it..Modernist (talk) 20:40, 5 December 2008 (UTC)

Expanding art movement links to articles, alphabetizing[edit]

Was going to format back to 2 columns for the lists, also revise and expand according to the following:

1900-1918 Abstract expressionism · Art Deco · Art Photography · Ashcan School · Constructivism · Cubism · Dadaism · Der Blaue Reiter · De Stijl · Deutscher Werkbund · Die Brücke · Expressionism · Fauvism · Futurism · Hungarian Activism · Installation art · Jack of Diamonds · Metaphysical art · Neo-Fauvism · Neue Künstlervereinigung München · Neo-expressionism · Pittura Metafisica · Post-painterly abstraction · Purism · Rayonism · School of Amsterdam · Orphism · Synchromism · Scuola Romana · Suprematism · Vorticism · 1918-1945 American Scene Painting · Arbeitsrat für Kunst · Art Deco · Bauhaus · Color Field painting · Concrete Art · Der Ring · Ecole de Paris · Elementarism · Gruppo 7 · International Style · Lyrical Abstraction · Magic Realism · M.I.A.R. · Neo-Romanticism · Neue Sachlichkeit · New Objectivity · Novecento Italiano · Novembergruppe · Precisionism · Social Realism · Socialist Realism · Surrealism · 1945-1965 Abstract Expressionism · Action painting · Art Brut · Art Informel · Assemblage · Beat Art · CoBrA · Combines · Conceptual Art · Existential Art · Fluxus · Funk Art · GRAV · Happening · Hard-Edge Painting · International Typographic Style · Kinetic Art · Kitchen Sink School · Lettrism · Letterist International · Neo-Dada · New Brutalism · Nouveau Réalisme · Op Art · Organic Abstraction · Outsider Art · Performance Art · Photorealism · Pop Art · Post-painterly Abstraction · Situationist International · Tachisme · Vienna School of Fantastic Realism · 1965-2000 Anti-Design · Arte Povera · Body Art · Conceptual Art · DesignArt · Destination Art · Earth Art · Fluxus · Geometric abstraction · Installation art · Internet Art · Land art · Lowbrow · Minimalism · Neo-Dada · Neo-Expressionism · Neo-pop · New media art · Postminimalism · Postmodernism · Site Works · Sound Art · Stuckism · Super-realism · Supports-Surfaces · Systems art · {Transavanguardia · Video Art · Young British Artists · 21st century Altermodernism · Dogme 95 · Hyperrealism · IMMAGINE&POESIA · Intervention art · Metamodernism · Neo-Geo · Neo-minimalism · Post-postmodernism · Pseudorealism · Relational art · Remodernism · SoFlo Superflat · Sound art · Stuckism International · Superflat · Superstroke · Video game art

Also adding some links to the 19C list: Academic · Barbizon school · Biedermeier · Cloisonnism · Divisionism · Gründerzeit · Historicism · Hudson River School · Impressionism · Les Nabis · Nazarene · Neo-impressionism · Pointillism · Post-Impressionism · Pre-Raphaelites · Realism · Symbolism · Synthetism ·

I don't know what mistakes User:Modernist refers to on my User talk page. A lot of the movements' article links I'm trying to add are in a number of reliable sources. Nearly all are listed in "Styles, Schools and Movements" by Amy Dempsey (2010) London: Thames & Hudson) ISBN 9780500288443

Sorry it looks like a mess while I'm in the middle of editing, but I can't finish what I'm trying to do if another editor edit wars by hopping in while I'm in the midst of making changes and prevents me from finishing what I'm doing by blocking edits that way. Real-time edit warring? OttawaAC (talk) 14:22, 7 November 2011 (UTC)

You have made too many mistakes, the red links have to go and you can alphabetize when it is correct...Modernist (talk) 14:27, 7 November 2011 (UTC)

Sorry, but there is no rule stipulating that red links must be removed from articles. Red links are our friends. Also, you are missing droves of valid links to existing articles. As indicated in the huge list above that I put together this morning. You can add one article link at a time and fuss about what's there now, but you're wasting time revising links that I will replace anyway when I get a chance to paste in more extensive lists.OttawaAC (talk) 14:56, 7 November 2011 (UTC)

Your red links are a waste of time - because there are no prohibits does not give you license - either do it right it or don't bother...Modernist (talk) 16:02, 7 November 2011 (UTC)
Instead of adding droves of red liks and other links - try just doing a few correct ones at a time and don't be in such a hurry...Modernist (talk) 16:11, 7 November 2011 (UTC)
Yes they used a term Abstract expressionism to describe Kandinsky - but the art movement is associated with the American painters of the 1940s and 1950s. If you want to use both which I do not recommend then draw a distinction between its use as a descriptive and its use as an art movement. The other cross outs are the tip of an iceberg of mistakes...Modernist (talk) 16:17, 7 November 2011 (UTC)

Omission of the Educational Art during the period 1965-2000 (The Multiple Sculpture)[edit]

Let's establish in a first place the notability and verifiable sources:

a) Canada Nations Capital newspaper, The Ottawa Citizen (The Citizen, Ottawa) with daily circulation over 100 000
b) National Library of Canada

1.) Origin of the Multiple Sculpture was documented in the article titled 'Sculptor... takes your all., by Jenny Bergin Page 36 Sat. Oct. 28, 1972, The Ottawa Citizen. Unfortunately not yet on Internet, but could be verified by requesting a copy from The Citizen,Ottawa.

2.) The second introduction of the Multiple Sculpture in 1981, was introduced at The National Library of Canada and documented in the article Perseverance Pays Off, by Nancy Baele, Page 74 The Ottawa Citizen, Nov. 26, 1981. It could be found under Rasto: Legacy of Vinland. (1981)

3.) Another document to the Multiple Sculpture could be found under same heading Rasto: Legacy of Vinland; recorded at the National Library of Canada publication. (1981)

4.) In 1985 not only reference to Multiple Sculpture but I quote: he calls himself 'the Originator of the Multiple Sculpture', in the article titled Area artists to exhibit with best in New York, Page D22, The Citizen, Ottawa, Friday, August 23, 1985. This article may be found on the internet under: sculptor Rasto, on around the page 20

Of course there are more references to the Multiple Sculpture as an Educational Art (defined 1987)

And now a few quotes from Guest books (verifiable upon demand) 1981 - "Fantastic!" may be appropriate, but "Poetic" is the truth and hols a great promise. It has been a privilege to see this decade of creative effort and I look forward to seeing the flowering of "Multiple Sculpture" in the next decade. With best wishes and much success, Rudolf Papanek and family (Nov. 1981 the Guest Book at exhibition) 1982 - Effective, clever, articulate, both yourself & the work. Hope you spread your brilliant discovery so more might pursue what seams to be a foray. B. Days 10-11-82 New York, Guests Book from exhibition 'Introduction of New Artists, Madison Square Gardens.

This is just to establish the existence and the origin of the Educational Art, The Multiple Sculpture, later identified as Multiple/ Multilateral Sculpture. These are the facts, not a promotion nor B.S. just facts, and there is more, much more... Rasto Hlavina 21, 12, 2011 74.210.37.164 (talk) 17:10, 21 December 2011 (UTC)

Omission of the Educational Art during the period 1965-2000 (The Multiple Sculpture)[edit]

Let's establish in a first place the notability and verifiable sources:

a) Canada Nations Capital newspaper, The Ottawa Citizen (The Citizen, Ottawa) with daily circulation over 100 000
b) National Library of Canada

1.) Origin of the Multiple Sculpture was documented in the article titled 'Sculptor... takes your all., by Jenny Bergin Page 36 Sat. Oct. 28, 1972, The Ottawa Citizen. Unfortunately not yet on Internet, but could be verified by requesting a copy from The Citizen,Ottawa.

2.) The second introduction of the Multiple Sculpture in 1981, was introduced at The National Library of Canada and documented in the article Perseverance Pays Off, by Nancy Baele, Page 74 The Ottawa Citizen, Nov. 26, 1981. It could be found under Rasto: Legacy of Vinland. (1981)

3.) Another document to the Multiple Sculpture could be found under same heading Rasto: Legacy of Vinland; recorded at the National Library of Canada publication. (1981)

4.) In 1985 not only reference to Multiple Sculpture but I quote: he calls himself 'the Originator of the Multiple Sculpture', in the article titled Area artists to exhibit with best in New York, Page D22, The Citizen, Ottawa, Friday, August 23, 1985. This article may be found on the internet under: sculptor Rasto, on around the page 20

Of course there are more references to the Multiple Sculpture as an Educational Art (defined 1987)

And now a few quotes from Guest books (verifiable upon demand) 1981 - "Fantastic!" may be appropriate, but "Poetic" is the truth and hols a great promise. It has been a privilege to see this decade of creative effort and I look forward to seeing the flowering of "Multiple Sculpture" in the next decade. With best wishes and much success, Rudolf Papanek and family (Nov. 1981 the Guest Book at exhibition) 1982 - Effective, clever, articulate, both yourself & the work. Hope you spread your brilliant discovery so more might pursue what seams to be a foray. B. Days 10-11-82 New York, Guests Book from exhibition 'Introduction of New Artists, Madison Square Gardens.

This is just to establish the existence and the origin of the Educational Art, The Multiple Sculpture, later identified as Multiple/ Multilateral Sculpture. These are the facts, not a promotion nor B.S. just facts, and there is more, much more... Rasto Hlavina 21, 12, 2011 74.210.37.164 (talk) 17:19, 21 December 2011 (UTC) By the way, the entry in Guest Book by Rudolf Papanek, who was Rudolf Papanek see: architect Rudolf Papanek. Rasto Hlavina 74.210.37.164 (talk) 13:05, 27 December 2011 (UTC)

1965-? The Industrialization of the Arts as a Movement[edit]

The beginning of this era is correctly defined by year 1965, the time of introduction of public money into the Arts by the establishment of The National Endowment for the Arts.

The official theme was to support the search for excellency in the Arts. As such it opened the door to liberalization in the Arts, and begun to grow exponentially. It initiated a constant re-invention of the Arts, quasi movements, penetrated into every level of cultural activity, and asserted itself to become the main stream. By fraternization also with communication media on every level and beyond, this public support in reality created a whole new and successful industry - The industry of Art. Based on this, the the whole era could be defined as one movement, The Industrialization of the Arts.

That is for the mainstream Art. Concurrently there was another independent movement in making, this was the development of The Multiple / Multilateral Sculpture, as an educational tool. Though shied by the mainstream media, it was presented in the article titled ' Aylmer Sculptor Starts Art Movement ' Dec 17, 1981, The Aylmer Bulletin, page 7, authored by Margaret Virany. For reference you have to ask the newspaper for a copy. The Multiple / Multilateral Sculpture has opened the door to a whole new perspective on Art and with it the wide horizon to be explored not only by artists, but also by researchers, philosophers and many more areas... Rasto Hlavina 74.210.37.164 (talk) 20:55, 3 January 2012 (UTC)

An example of art style that is not Western and not listed[edit]

Ukiyo-e art. There are a lot of others in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Marasama (talk) 20:19, 16 November 2012 (UTC)