Talk:Askari

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Africa / Tanzania / Uganda (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Africa, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Africa on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Tanzania.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Uganda.
 
WikiProject Military history (Rated C-Class)
MILHIST This article is within the scope of the Military history WikiProject. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see a list of open tasks. To use this banner, please see the full instructions.
C This article has been rated as C-Class on the quality assessment scale.

Can't be 1943[edit]

Anyone knows how a colour photograph, and a very good quality one at that, ended up on this page with a date of 1943? Since I had no ways of finding the proper year and since the picture is interesting whatever its date, I just removed the obviously faulty year.

The information describing the picture is detailed and specific about it being 1943. Modern colour photography started in 1936. The design of the aircraft look like it could be 1943. Why do you think it has an "obviously faulty year"? Mark.murphy 18:54, 27 March 2006 (UTC)

Exactly. See Commons:Category:World War II color photographs, or see The Four Feathers (1939 film), which was shot mostly in Sudan, and beautifully. This military portrait is indeed a particularly good piece of work, with precise control of tone and depth of field. However, excellent craftsmanship is not a recent invention. More the other way round; a photo like this would be at least as worthy of pride today though it wouldn't be as time consuming. Jim.henderson (talk) 01:28, 5 April 2010 (UTC)

Confusing line[edit]

What does this line mean?

In the event the majority of the newly recruited Ethiopian askaris went over to the Free Ethiopian forces and their British Commonwealth allies following the outbreak of war.

--Awiseman 17:14, 4 October 2006 (UTC)

Ascari (Colonial Soldier)[edit]

I think Ascari (Colonial Soldier) should be merged into this page. It's the same thing --Awiseman 18:48, 5 October 2006 (UTC)

I started the article before finding out about Askari - probably best that we merge but include the reference to the Italian spelling

Needs Overhaul[edit]

Added a few 'citations needed' notes after trying (unsucessfully) to verify the information. Am going to write up something new upon the topic of German Askari. Also, there is a HUGE mistake in the article. 'Askar' is the singular, 'Askari' is the plural. Am going to attempt to edit the whole article to reflect as such. TaylorSAllen 00:13, 7 February 2007 (UTC)

My reading is that the proper term is Askaris (as in "army", there's no singular). It has, however, been erroneously declined into "Askari" in some sources by authors who have used it as if it were from one of the Baltic languages. The current article is a mishmosh of two completely different usages of askaris and/versus askari, one being for those fighting against their own, the other for simple policing. At last that's how I've seen it... VєсrumЬа TALK 01:07, 11 September 2012 (UTC)

Askari[edit]

It should also be noted that Askari is also a colloquial term for night watchman. Throughout E Africa the only references made to an askari is in this way. Nuttycow 12:03, 26 April 2007 (UTC)

It should also be noted that there is not a word like Askari in Turkish. Turks rather call "Asker" to military people. So it is not a direct translation and it misleads readers about the Turkish language. Deliogul 20:08, 18 July 2007 (UTC)
I've never heard of that usage, Nuttycow. Are you speaking of Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania? In Ethiopia and Eritrea it's used to refer to those Eritreans who fought for the Italians. — ዮም | (Yom) | TalkcontribsEthiopia 20:42, 18 July 2007 (UTC)
At least in Kenya security guards who watch homeyards, companies and other property are commonly called Askari. Julius Sahara 17:38, 14 October 2007 (UTC)

File:Ascari&Italiansoldierfriendship.jpg Nominated for Deletion[edit]

Image-x-generic.svg An image used in this article, File:Ascari&Italiansoldierfriendship.jpg, has been nominated for deletion at Wikimedia Commons in the following category: Media without a source as of 27 December 2011
What should I do?

Don't panic; a discussion will now take place over on Commons about whether to remove the file. This gives you an opportunity to contest the deletion, although please review Commons guidelines before doing so.

  • If the image is non-free then you may need to upload it to Wikipedia (Commons does not allow fair use)
  • If the image isn't freely licensed and there is no fair use rationale then it cannot be uploaded or used.

This notification is provided by a Bot --CommonsNotificationBot (talk) 17:06, 30 December 2011 (UTC)

File:Askari.jpeg Nominated for Deletion[edit]

Image-x-generic.svg An image used in this article, File:Askari.jpeg, has been nominated for deletion at Wikimedia Commons in the following category: Media without a source as of 20 February 2012
What should I do?

Don't panic; a discussion will now take place over on Commons about whether to remove the file. This gives you an opportunity to contest the deletion, although please review Commons guidelines before doing so.

  • If the image is non-free then you may need to upload it to Wikipedia (Commons does not allow fair use)
  • If the image isn't freely licensed and there is no fair use rationale then it cannot be uploaded or used.

To take part in any discussion, or to review a more detailed deletion rationale please visit the relevant image page (File:Askari.jpeg)

This is Bot placed notification, another user has nominated/tagged the image --CommonsNotificationBot (talk) 19:19, 20 February 2012 (UTC)

Unverified Citation for Askari Pensions[edit]

I did my investigating using Google Books / Google / Other Pages Citing The Reference In Question, in attempt to locate phrases referring to the Askari in the linked source.

Investigating the source on Google Books, and doing a Book Search for "Askari" did not locate this reference. Further googling for Askari details did not reproduce this reference. Investigating the Wikipedia History section, I located the citation added In This Revision, however the statement about back pay was added way back in This Revision without a source, and the original sentiment about back pay expressed by the exact same user.

As I've been instructed to do previously, I have added a tag to clarify that the citation is unverified, due to the lack of ability to verify it through direct means. 72.83.42.247 (talk) 03:51, 30 October 2012 (UTC)

Adding to update: I have added a citation given to me via a German contact, which verifies the statement not verified by the original citation. Unfortunately, the article does not have an English translated port, so the translation can only be viewed via google translate or similar. I'm uncertain if I am allowed to link to such a thing in reference, so I've referenced it in the strictly proper manner (to the article, with the title, and physical print date/source). Much thanks to "CountVonTroll" for locating the Spiegel article. FACT CHECKING ALIEN (talk) 19:10, 30 October 2012 (UTC)

Askari?[edit]

A big 'hmmmm...' for the first two lines of the paragraph on the British colonies. Local forces operating with or for Europeans were not automatically 'Askaris'. The word Askari, whether in British, German or Italian usage, itself implied a trained and disciplined soldier. He would have received at least a modicum of formal training, be dressed in recognisable uniform - albeit adopted to local climate and cultural norms - and would fight and manoeuvre in the European style. For bodies of troops serving under local chiefs, in local dress, with local weapons, and in a local manner, the word Levy was often used. The word, like the later word 'Commando', was used both for the individual and the grouping of which he was a member. The word warrior would seem more appropriate for the individual than the word soldier. (Discuss). The term Levies could, however, contain a wide spectrum of forces, from tribal forces, to units, certainly by WW2, close to being an unofficial colonial regiment, with everything short of an Establishment: a fixed membership, a fixed structure, uniform, reasonably modern firearms, pay, etc; certainly. The IBEAC administration was, by definition, not an administration of the British Empire, any more than Halliburton or Blackwater guards were regiments of the US Army in Iraq. When BEA became a Crown Colony, the already long-established tradition of organised local troops was set up by the colonial authorities. What seems to be described in the lines is he improvised guard-force for a Charter Company, not even a Levy as understood, for about seven years prior to the establishment of colonial government, and not a colonial regiment. (Discuss).Protozoon (talk) 15:02, 30 March 2015 (UTC)