Talk:Assyrian cuisine

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Help![edit]

I need help with this article.

There are many Assyrians from Iran in the San Francisco Bay Area. Their church on Brotherhood Way is quite large and even has (or used to have) an Assyrian Food Festival every year. I've been out of touch for years, but perhaps someone there could help you or could contribute to the Iranian aspect of Assyrian cuisine. Also there is quite a strong Assyrian cultural support organization -- I have no idea what it's called...Assyrian Universal Alliance, it looks like. This is the email address for their "spokesperson": Ninous.BeitAshour@aua.net Might give him a try. I was hunting, around and it looks like one of their members wrote an Assyrian cookbook, and maybe he could hook you up. HTH Zlama (talk) 06:22, 3 December 2011 (UTC)

This cuisine is exclusively Iraqi-Assyrian. Assyrians from Iran do not eat any many of these dishes.[edit]

Well then contribute...[edit]

What can you add that's non-Iraqi?

Baklava[edit]

The sources claiming that Baklava is of Assyrian origin are poor. Several are just plagiarized copies of others, and none have good sources. Take a look at other articles on the kitchenproject.com site; the 'scone' page has an etymology not supported by standard dictionaries; the Beef Stroganoff page has the standard legend which is refuted by the fact that Molokhovets has an earlier recipe; the focaccia page has good content, but only because it consists 90% of a quotation from Davidson.

I think the Assyrian cuisine page would be better if it didn't mention the supposed 8th century BCE origin of Baklava in Assyria at all, but if it is going to, it should surely mention the only serious, scholarly sources on the topic, which do not support this legend. That is just basic intellectual honesty.

Using multiple IP addresses to revert without discussion is getting to be vandalism. Stop. --Macrakis 16:50, 15 October 2006 (UTC)

I agree 100%. Anon: this is the place to discuss any problems, thank you. —Khoikhoi 17:45, 15 October 2006 (UTC)

Your pro-Turk propaganda has no place on this article. (unsigned message by User:12.15.7.70 at 2006-10-20T14:30:36)

Dear anon, I am Greek, so I don't see why I'd be indulging in pro-Turk propaganda. I am simply following whatever scholarly literature I can find. If you can find other good sources, that would be great. By the way, in your edit comment, you said:

  • rv, Sami Zubaida is a Turk. Neither him nor the other author are SCHOLARS.

This is wrong in several ways. Zubaida is not the author of the article, Charles Perry is; Zubaida is the editor of the volume. What's more, Sami Zubaida is in fact a very senior scholar, as you can see from the Wikipedia article on him, and he is not Turkish, but Iraqi Jewish.[1] As for Charles Perry, the author of the article in question, he has written many articles and books on the cooking of the region, including Medieval Arab Cookery, a new translation of Al-Baghdadi's Kitab al-Tabikh, and contributions to Petits Propos Culinaires (I made a mistake in my edit comment, confusing him with John Perry of U. of Chicago, who is a professor of Persian). The Web sources references are not very good. A couple are clearly just copies (of each other, or of some other document). The story about 'Greek sailors' is unlikely: sailors can easily transmit things, but how do they transmit cooking techniques? And anyway, unreferenced Web sources are less good sources than published work. I don't claim that Perry's theory is the last word (or the only word) on the subject, just that it's the best source I've been able to find so far. --Macrakis 15:00, 20 October 2006 (UTC)

The sources "the baklava guy" and buzzle.com are certainly unreliable, probably habeeb is, as well. Also, they all have copyright issues. 78.190.42.63 (talk) 02:47, 16 November 2012 (UTC) Kitchenproject, turkishculture.org, natashacafe.com have those issues as well. 78.190.42.63 (talk) 02:51, 16 November 2012 (UTC) I removed those sources and rephrased it a bit. I do not see why it should be included on the main page, so I am moving it here for discussion. Does baklava have a central place in the Assyrian cuisine, at least among the deserts? Also, main page should include more from historical Assyrian cuisine, I believe.

  • Current scholarly work indicates that baklava, a dessert popular in Assyrian cuisine, is possibly of central Asian Turkic origin.[1] Certain sources on the web indicate that Assyrians invented the desert.[2]

78.190.42.63 (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 03:06, 16 November 2012 (UTC)

The discussion about pork should probably be not that long in the lead section. It can be elaborated somewhere below. A lot of improvements can be done to the text. or now, I will be changing the titles of sections. I believe it will be better. 78.190.42.63 (talk) 03:13, 16 November 2012 (UTC)

This article needs attention.[edit]

Where is everyone? Sharru Kinnu III 12:48, 17 July 2007 (UTC)

Home sweet home. Feels good to be back. Sharru Kinnu III 02:40, 4 September 2007 (UTC)

aaamodesto link dead[edit]

The link to AAA Modesto for Assyrian recipes is dead. Zlama (talk) 06:12, 3 December 2011 (UTC)

Hareesa[edit]

thinking about adding in hareesa. let me know how you feel. — Preceding unsigned comment added by PBurnin11 (talkcontribs) 04:10, 20 March 2012 (UTC)

  1. ^ Perry, Charles. "The Taste for Layered Bread among the Nomadic Turks and the Central Asian Origins of Baklava", in A Taste of Thyme: Culinary Cultures of the Middle East (ed. Sami Zubaida, Richard Tapper), 1994. ISBN 1-86064-603-4; fuller scholarly bibliography at the baklava article.
  2. ^ Baklava War Intensifies