Talk:Astraea (mythology)

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Comments[edit]

We - in Austria - see "Astraea" as the roman goddess of justice, known as Dike in greek mythology. -- ys Robodoc.at 17:57, 29 Feb 2004 (UTC)

Confusing[edit]

...is the mythology that explains that she ruled in the Golden Age up to and into the Iron Age, when she fled the evils of the world and went into Heaven (Olympos-something?)... except: 1. there are two intervening ages: the Silver Age and the Bronze Age, 2. according to the myth, she fled from the evil Bronze Age men Hyginus Astronomica: "Virgin" (Brazen), that Zeus drowned in the Deucalionic Deluge. ... said: Rursus (bork²) 10:37, 10 June 2009 (UTC)