Talk:Atmosphere of Mercury

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Idempotent (talk) 18:48, 3 August 2010 (UTC)

Almost no atmosphere[edit]

Isn't Mercury's sky always black. Mercury in general is almost no atmosphere, and most of gas such as sodium are fake.--Freewayguy What's up? 21:16, 19 August 2008 (UTC)

Most undifficult planet to observe[edit]

Is it accurate to say that "Mercury is the most undifficult planet to observe due to its proximity to the Sun"? Surely Uranus and Neptune are more difficult? I wonder if this should be changed to "Among the terrestrial planets, Mercury is the most undifficult to observe due to its proximity to the Sun"? Idempotent (talk) 18:36, 2 August 2010 (UTC)

Returning to this point: After some investigation I believe that what the writer of the statement meant was that Mercury is often too close to the Sun to be well-placed for observations. So on second thought it seems fine as is. Idempotent (talk) 15:57, 3 August 2010 (UTC)

"Hermian"?[edit]

Even if "Hermian" ("Hermean" seems likelier) is correctly an adjective to describe the planet Mercury (and why only that, and not the god Mercury, to say nothing of the god Hermes?), it is so uncolloquial as to make me question its place here. Nor does this word have common equivalents: the pages for the Sun, Mars, and Venus do not use "Helian", "Arean" or "Aphroditean", but "Solar", "Martian", and "Venusian" (note "Venusian" rather than "Venereal"), all well-recognized English words derived from, but not copied from, Latin originals. Where the derived form conflicts with another common word (e.g. "venereal"), the adjective is ruthlessly compelled to comply strictly with modern English usage, as if it had been formed directly from the name. Here's another example, from the Jupiter page:

Jovian is the adjectival form of Jupiter. The older adjectival form jovial, employed by astrologers in the Middle Ages, has come to mean "happy" or "merry," moods ascribed to Jupiter's astrological influence.

the planet-name adjectives are formed from the (Latin) planet names as if they were native Latin words, unless they conflict with English usage, in which case they are compelled to follow that, though with as slight a change as convenient ("Jovian" rather than "Jupiterian"). In no case does Greek enter into it. The form "Hermian" seems to have been introduced here as a homage to Hermes, probably due to the Roman esteem for Greek culture, or the habit Mediterranean theologians had of drawing comparisons between the various gods worshipped in various areas. Perhaps we all ought to have used Greek names for the planets and Greek nomenclature too; however, we did not, and pretending we did only confuses people. I say, change it. Scutigera (talk) 19:00, 16 March 2013 (UTC)