Talk:Augustus Saint-Gaudens

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Central Park (7365 bytes) List of U.S. national parks (18628 bytes) List of sculptors (5290 bytes) Geography of France (7550 bytes) William Harvey Carney (1934 bytes) Haute-Garonne (1798 bytes) Francis Davis Millet (2102 bytes) List of people on stamps of the United States (28563 bytes) List of French airports (22934 bytes) User talk:Tarquin/Archive 2 (26815 bytes) Visual arts of the United States (3999 bytes) Global protests against war on Iraq (pre-war) (26333 bytes) French arrondissements (40962 bytes) Wikipedia:Deletion log archive/September 2003 (359467 bytes) List of towns in France (3469 bytes) Double eagle (3788 bytes) Aimeric de Peguilhan (925 bytes) 1: ...troubadour]], born in Peguilhan (near Saint Gaudens) the son of a cloth merchant. Frederick William Macmonnies (5198 bytes) Oakes Ames (4230 bytes) Henry Bacon (2351 bytes) Wikipedia:List of encyclopedia topics (04) (18189 bytes) Wikipedia:List of encyclopedia topics (61) (14854 bytes) City Beautiful movement (4616 bytes) Communes of the Haute-Garonne département (28128 bytes) Wikipedia:List of encyclopedia topics/Biographies S (106790 bytes) Lincoln Park (park) (6063 bytes) Louis Chiron (2345 bytes) 4: ...ce, taking the Grand Prix de Comminges at Saint-Gaudens near the city of Toulouse. From there, Chi...

Or these 12 List of U.S. national parks (18628 bytes) 1: ...al other types of protected areas of the United States: List of people on stamps of the United States (28563 bytes) 1: ...at person first appeared on a stamp of the United States. 3: ...ities had previously issued their own provisional stamps. List of French airports (22934 bytes) 1: fr:Liste des aérodromes français 2: The following is a list of airports in France. 4: There is also a list of airports sorted by ICAO Airport Code. User talk:Tarquin/Archive 2 (26815 bytes) Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills Cemetery (4769 bytes) 1: ... Glendale, California, is located at 6300 Forest Lawn Drive in Los Angeles, California. 2: ...al parks are recognized and serve as a cultural institution in the Los Angeles regional area. 3: ...tion of American history, and hosts high-profile events such as an annual [[Veteran'... 5: * The Court Of Liberty features statues of Washington and [[Th... Global protests against war on Iraq (pre-war) (26333 bytes) 1: ...ggest global peace protests before a war actually started; the peace movement is compared with the... 5: ...test organizers only had a permit for 30,000 demonstrators. According to rally organizers, 200,000+ Am... Wikipedia:Deletion log archive/September 2003 (359467 bytes) 4: #23:13, 30 Sep 2003 Hephaestos deleted "Fin rot" (content was: 'Ishkabib... French Grand Prix (11922 bytes) 5: ...[Automobile Club de France]] in Sarthe with a starting field of thity-two automobiles. Double eagle (3788 bytes) 1: ...ishing a Mint, and regulating Coins of the United States", section 9, April 2, 1792). Likewise... 3: ...eginning in 1795, just two years after the first US mint opened. Since the $20 gold piece had twic... Wikipedia:List of encyclopedia topics (04) (18189 bytes) 1: <div style="float:right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; text-align:... Wikipedia:List of encyclopedia topics (61) (14854 bytes) 1: <div style="float:right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; text-align:... Wikipedia:List of encyclopedia topics/Biographies S (106790 bytes) 3: ...also "Bustan"), "The Rose Garden" 1258 (also "Gulistan") </nowiki> 5: ...torium & Kresge Chapel at MIT 1953-1955, U.S. Embassy in London 1955-1960...

Sure, and an "Irish sculptor" indeed![edit]

I don't want to raise a whole brouhaha over it, but New Hampshire-born Saint-Gaudens, with an Irish parent, was actually more of a "French sculptor." At least for anyone who's actually read the article. Ordinarily, correcting a category doesn't start an edit donegal eh.... --Wetman 21:11, 7 Mar 2005 (UTC)

Another opinion. Okay, so ASG was born in Ireland. He left there for NYC when he was about 6 months old. Not likey that he developed much of a brogue in that time. He is a "French" sculptor not because his father was born in France, because dad had left Franch long behind by the time ASG was born, but because he studied in Paris and worked in what was then called something like the "French Style." Daniel Chester French worked in the same style and no one called him "French." . . . . . . . .... Well . . . . ..... you know what I mean.... (User:JohannWolfgang)

Saint-Gaudens should be removed from two categories listed here: Irish Sculptors (which he was not) and Irish people of French Descent (which is misleading in this case)Buckyboot (talk) 02:06, 27 September 2012 (UTC)

looking back at the 2005 discussion above I am surptised to see my reply to Wetman as being credited to (User:JohannWolfgang). But sure, get those categories outta here. Einar aka Carptrash (talk) 02:58, 27 September 2012 (UTC)

Suggested move: Augustus Saint Gaudens[edit]

... It is also interesting [at least for me] to note that SAG himself wrote in 1888, "My name should be spelt without a hyphen IE. Saint Gaudens." He also explained that he end of his name should be pronounced, " 'ens" as in 'enslave' " a totally American way of pronouncing it - suggesting that he saw himself as neither French nor Irish, but as American. Hmmmmmm perhaps [if I knew how to do it] I'd deffer to the old guy's wishes and get that damned hyphen out of wikipedia too ? (User:Johann Wolfgang)

I've split Johann Wolfgang's commentary above, as such a move, with a note refering to the sculptor's own preference, would improve the article. --Wetman 20:20, 6 August 2006 (UTC)

I respectfully disagree: Historically (during the artist's career and since, the name has always been spelled with a hyphen, so that removing it would confuse. In his biography of his father, Saint-Gaudens' son, Homer Saint-Gaudens, used the hyphen when referring to his father, his uncle and himself. Buckyboot (talk) 02:11, 27 September 2012 (UTC)

Saint-Gaudens typically signed his own work (in bronze no less) with a hyphen: his portrait of Jules Bastien-Lepage (1880) for example, or his portrait of William Picknell (1877), his portrait of his son, Homer Saint-Gaudens (1882), his portrait of Charles Beaman (1894), or his Washington Medal, (1889) inscribed "copyrighted by Augustus Saint-Gaudens". There were exceptions, of course, when he dropped the hyphen, usually when signing with a monogram: his medal of the artist John S. Sargent (1880) is signed "FECE A ST G". Buckyboot (talk) 02:34, 27 September 2012 (UTC)

I am pretty sure that the (User:Johann Wolfgang) comment above was me too,(se posting 3 minutes ago) but in any case, regardless of what St. G wished, the hyphen is here to stay. Carptrash (talk) 03:02, 27 September 2012 (UTC)

I just moved this phrase[edit]

among them his memorable image of Deacon Samuel Chapin, forever synonymous with the title of The Puritan
here. It was added to the post-1900 section of St. G's life, but the work was produced in 1886. The phrase probably can be put back, but it needs to go somewhere else. Carptrash 22:13, 11 November 2006 (UTC)

Shaw Memorial versions[edit]

"the greatest of which is the bronze bas-relief that forms the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial on Boston Common, 1884 - 1897, Saint-Gaudens labored on it for fourteen years, and even after the public version had been unveiled, he continued with further versions."

Exactly how many versions of the Shaw Memorial were there, and exactly what happened to them? There is the main version on the Boston Common. There is apparently some version in Cornish NH now. A plaster version was loaned in 1997 to DC:
"The sculptor's much-adjusted plaster version of the sculpture group will go on public view Sept. 21 at the National Gallery of Art... The newly restored plaster arrives here on a 10-year renewable loan from the National Park Service's Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, N.H... The plaster is a bas-relief 15 feet high, 18 feet wide and 3 feet deep."[1]-69.87.201.126 22:25, 24 March 2007 (UTC)

For the record, the one pictured at the Robert Gould Shaw article is the version in Cornish NH. Since it is a fairly recent casting, compared to the one in Boston anyway, I'd guess (opinion) that it has whatever changes St. G made in the plaster version. Carptrash 01:07, 25 March 2007 (UTC)

in the opening paragraph[edit]

I find the phrase, " many of which still stand. " and I am wondering what St G created that does not still stand? Einar aka Carptrash (talk) 03:30, 26 October 2012 (UTC)

The saga of one word[edit]

I noticed today while going over my watch-list that an unregistered editor (always suspect, along with red link editors) had removed the word Tumulus from the discussion of the Logan Monument. After checking the meaning of "tumulus" I thought back to my vision of the monument and thought, "Well, could have been." but as serious editors know, what I thought is pretty much beside the point, I needed a reference. So I looked the work up in my St. Gaudens' books, his autobiography and the works of Dryfhout, and Greenthal, and Wilkinson and found nothing beyond "a hill." And that Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White had designed the pedestal. And that Daniel Burnham had somehow been involved. However since Alexander Phimister Proctor had created the horse, I checked his autobiography as well as a monograph on his life and work by, I think, his grandson. There I learned that the "plinth" was designed by MM&W and the site "planned" by Burnham. So I looked in Burnham's "Plan of Chicago" (one of the real gems of my library) and discovered several mentions of St. G (including his famous 1893 statement) as well of discussions about Grant Park, but no Logan and no tumulus. I sidetracked into Squier & Davis' Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley and "Indian Mounds and Villages in Illinois", hoping to get lucky, but no. Since White was the MM&W partner who executed the commission I checked out Baker's "Stanny" there learning that Burnham "supervised construction of the pedestal", to me, an odd phrase, suggesting that he did more than just what any competent construction foreman would do. I moved on to Riedy's "Chicago Sculpture" (nothing enlightening) but in Bach's "Chicago Public Sculpture" discovered a "dramatic moundlike site. actually a small environment designed by Stanford White." So is that what happened? White, or perhaps Burnham, designed a hill to look like a burial mound for the statue and pedestal to sit on and it became in someone's fertile mind a "tumulus"? In any case the word is rightfully gone, but here is what is scary to me. Do a google search for "Logan" or "St Gaudens" and "atop a tumulus" and you will get countless (okay, so count them) hits. Based in what? I think based on misinformation (probably done in good faith) published on wikipedia. Food for thought. For me, a six course meal. Einar aka Carptrash (talk) 21:04, 23 June 2013 (UTC)
PS Hi Walt, saw you just here.