Talk:Ayin

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I've included a reference to the way Maltese represents the 'ayin' but I'm not sure it's in the right place. Any suggestions?

Also, should I add this article to WikiProject Malta? It's already been tagged by WikiProject Judaism (would I need to link it to an Arabic equivalent too??)- thanks. Kalindoscopy (talk) 05:45, 20 February 2008 (UTC)

I think that, since this is more about the character(s) in related semitic writing systems that you probably shouldn't add it to WikiProject Malta, but it wouldn't hurt to ask someone there. — Ƶ§œš¹ [aɪm ˈfɻɛ̃ⁿdˡi] 08:08, 20 February 2008 (UTC)

I've just noticed the changes you made: thanks. Re adding it to WP Malta, I've left a comment there about this whole ajn thing. Hopefully somebody directly involved will pick it up soon. Kalindoscopy (talk) 12:00, 20 February 2008 (UTC)

Another function of the ayin in Hebrew[edit]

... is the separation of vowels, I guess? So it is used to separate two a's to state they are not to be pronounced as one long vowel (aa as in Dutch vaag) but a'a as in Yemen's capital Sana'a. -andy 92.227.72.27 (talk) 02:31, 20 March 2008 (UTC)

That doesn't sound right at all. Are you just guessing? Sana'a is pronounced with a long a ([ˤanʕaːʔ]) in Arabic. — Ƶ§œš¹ [aɪm ˈfɻɛ̃ⁿdˡi] 02:34, 20 March 2008 (UTC)
I have three books to help me learn Hebrew, and only one of these books suggests the "ayin" sound is a laryngeal. My other two books say it is silent. If we find the ayin between two vowels, is it okay to pronounce it like a glottal stop? I wish my computer could transmit audio sounds reliably, but every time I try to click something in Wikipedia, supposedly being an audio file of some kind, I get nothing. The main article would be a lot more useful if there were a sound spectrograph of the ayin, separated by various consonants, and separated by various vowels. 216.99.219.18 (talk) 09:23, 4 October 2009 (UTC)
One of my books says that ayin is pronounced with the vocal chords vibrating (i.e., it is 'voiced' as opposed to 'unvoiced'). Is this true of all dialects, or just some? 216.99.198.86 (talk) 21:44, 4 October 2009 (UTC)
Well in the intro it says that it is a consonant, and in the examples included (ʿayin, al-ʿIrāq, ʿUmān, al-ʿArabiyyah as-Saʿūdiyyah, ʿArabī, ʿAmmān, yaʿăqōḇ, maʿăse, maʿărāḇ, ʿAmora, ʿAza) it is always next to a vowel and not to a consonant. --Jerome Potts (talk) 06:25, 20 April 2014 (UTC)