Talk:Bachelor's degree

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Ireland/Republic of Ireland[edit]

The UK and Northern Ireland feature under Europe, but there is no entry for Ireland. I would expect it is the same or very similar to England and NI, but I don't know, can anyone add some information? Packhorse (talk) 01:15, 6 January 2015 (UTC)Packhorse

No BS Degree[edit]

On the list of types of Bachelor's degrees, the venerable BS, Bachelor of Science, is missing. Steelangel (talk) 22:13, 6 November 2013 (UTC)

laurel berries, golden sceptres, etc.[edit]

I am amazed that for years this fakelore hase remained unchallenged. Somebody even added a "reference" to "substantiate" it.

The term "bachelor" for a junior member of a university dates to the 14th century. Later, I presume in the 17th century or so, it is very well possible that playful association with bacca lauri and baculum aureatum etc. was made. At the time, it was assumed that everyone concerned knew Latin and was aware that this was punning, not etymology. But now, I assume, "bachelors" do no longer know any Latin and the pun has become a folk etymology. --dab (𒁳) 13:26, 2 June 2014 (UTC)

Germany - The Abitur[edit]

The section on Germany describes the Abitur as a degree. That is highly misleading. It is a high school leaving certificate and the standard requirement for matriculation at a German university or equivalent. Norvo (talk) 03:09, 31 January 2015 (UTC)