Talk:Barnard College

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Neutrality Issues and the Columbia vs. Barnard Rivalry[edit]

I do not believe that the standards for neutrality are being met when this page states that, "Nevertheless, some Columbia students and alumnae are unhappy with Barnard's association with Columbia University. As a result, Barnard students are a regular jest for Columbia students. Popular points of insult include the relative intelligence of a Barnard girl vs. a Columbia girl, the "easiness" of Barnard girls, and the typical Barnard girl's eagerness to associate herself with the Columbia name."

It would be understandable if this rivalry were addressed in a subsection detailing the intricate relationship between Columbia University and Barnard College. However, this is certainly not "general information," nor a prominent view held on either campus.

discussion on Columbia University talk page[edit]

Hi, FYI, there is a dispute on the Columbia University talk page about the inclusion of "Barnard jokes" as part of the section on "University Traditions." Additional comments from other editors are welcome. Best, Matan 16:57, 3 December 2006 (UTC)

Barnard is not one of Columbia's undergraduate schools[edit]

I reverted the changes made by 207.237.214.24. Barnard is not one of Columbia's undergraduate schools. The three schools that do fit this criteria are Columbia College, SEAS, and GS. Barnard is an affiliate, like Teachers College.

Barnard's relationship to Columbia is weird; no question about it. Yes, Columbia awards Barnard's (and TC's) degrees. Yes, it's entirely proper for a résumé to read "AB from Barnard College, Columbia University." But no, it's not proper for the author of that résumé to claim that she "went to Columbia" for her undergraduate degree, because Barnard is not a Columbia undergraduate school. YLee 18:57, 21 February 2007 (UTC)

Hey, You can check on the barnard.edu website. It CLEARLY says it is an official college. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.69.194.6 (talk) 15:47, 18 April 2014 (UTC)

Category:Barnard College alumni[edit]

Category:Radcliffe College alumni has the Harvard Alumni and Ivy League Alumni categories, but I'm not sure if similar categories belong in the Barnard Alumni category due to Barnard's relationship with Columbia. Does anyone have any input on this? Cornell Rockey 21:25, 2 April 2007 (UTC)

If Columbia and Barnard ever to merge the way Harvard and Radcliffe did, then yes. Until then, no. YLee 01:43, 3 April 2007 (UTC)
With all due respect, YLee, that is your opinion. You stated earlier that the diplomas are from "Barnard College, Columbia University." As such, Barnard alumna should, and do, belong to the CU alumni category. Best, Matan 17:56, 3 April 2007 (UTC)
For me, I think this speaks to a lack of a clear explanation of the Columbia-Barnard relationship. The wikipedia article on Barnard gives it about 2 sentances, and it isn't clear at all. Could some one with some understanding of this clear it up? Cornell Rockey 21:21, 3 April 2007 (UTC)
It is tricky. As I wrote before, it'd be incorrect for a Barnard grad to say that she "went to Columbia," even though a résumé could properly read "Bachelor of Arts from Barnard College, Columbia University," because she attended Barnard—a separate institution—for her undergraduate education; all Columbia did was to issue the degree. Also, Barnard and Columbia women compete together on the same Ivy League athletic teams despite Barnard's not being a member, thanks to a special exemption.
I still vote "no" on the category-inclusion question, although it is a close call. The closest analogy I can come up with right now (and it's a pretty lame one) is to ask whether someone who graduated from UC Riverside or Irvine can say he "went to Cal." That's technically true in the sense that Riverside, Irvine, and Berkeley are all part of the larger University of California system, but in practice we'd all agree that that's misleading. With Barnard and Columbia, the institutional gulf is even larger; where Riverside, Irvine, and Berkeley are all part of the same university system, Barnard and Columbia are separate schools with separate Presidents, Boards of Trustees, and endowments. Columbia just happens to issue the Barnard degree, that's all.
Bah. While as a guy I definitely did not mind having hordes of spaghetti-strap tank top-wearing Barnard women everywhere around me (2400 Barnard women plus the roughly 50:50 men:women Columbia undergraduate student body; although the engineering school is 20:80, it's only 1000 students total), this whole discussion just underlines how it was a mistake that Barnard turned down the Columbia merger proposal. By all rights there should today be a single "Columbia-Barnard" undergraduate school with Broadway at its heart, as opposed to the baroque arrangement that exists in its place. YLee 09:09, 6 April 2007 (UTC)
To respond to the comment above regarding "all Columbia did was issue the degree," I have to wholeheartedly disagree. A Barnard administration may not be a Columbia administration, but a Barnard education is very much a Columbia education. As a Barnard student, I took as many classes at Columbia as I did at Barnard. I would say it was 50/50, and I wouldn't be surprised if a Columbia student had the same ratio of Columbia/Barnard classes. The undergraduate courses are very much integrated between the two schools, so it would not be surprising to find a Columbia student who took more classes at Barnard than Columbia, or vice versa. Moreover, Barnard professors must ultimately be approved by Columbia to be granted tenure, just like other Columbia professors. As such, a Barnard degree is very much a Columbia degree, and a Barnard graduate is very much a Columbia graduate. That is not to say that a Barnard graduate is right or wrong in saying that she graduated from Columbia, because that depends on your definition. Technically, she graduated from both Columbia and Barnard (as stated on her diploma and transcript), so she can choose to say either, or both. She may say she graduated from Barnard to outline the institution as independent of Columbia, or she may say she graduated from Columbia to outline her degree as issued by the Trustees of Columbia University. It is up to the individual to decide whether she wants to say "Barnard" or "Columbia," or both. Admittedly, the Barnard-Columbia relationship is complex and hard to define on the administrative level, but in terms of educational quality, there should be no debate that Barnard and Columbia students share and benefit from the same resources, making their educational experience essentially the same. Sevenkeysfm (talk) 23:29, 3 August 2008 (UTC)


Regardless of where classes were taken, you filled out an application for Barnard College.

criticism and controversy[edit]

Someone appears to edit this page on behalf of the college administration. mentions of the El Haj controversy have been vandalized.

There is little point in having articles on colleges on Wikipedia if they are edited and vetted to make contain only the information that the college wants to prblicize. Lida LeClair and Abu El Haj attracted natinal attention. there are probably other scandals.


I agree. The mention that Barnard receives Columbia degrees is also misleading. The Barnard degrees carry the Columbia seal, but it is not a de facto Columbia degree. And no, barnard alumni are not given Columbia alumni status. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.86.217.4 (talk) 14:50, 22 June 2009 (UTC)

Untrue. As Barnard itself states, "Barnard students receive the diploma of the University signed by the presidents of both institutions . . . the practice of having students receive the degree of the University." YLee (talk) 17:37, 29 September 2009 (UTC)

This is completely false. Barnard student attend 2 graduations: 1 at Barnard and 1 at Columbia. They receive the exact same degree as any other Columbia undergraduate and thus their degree is a Columbia University degree. This is not a question and thus there is no rebuttal. Bottom line this is the current situation regardless of any imagined controversy. Feel free to look it up. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 160.39.118.74 (talk) 19:05, 17 December 2010 (UTC)

NYT 1912 article[edit]

This is 1912 article about the college in the NYT Dy yol (talk) 05:45, 19 May 2009 (UTC)

Formatting[edit]

Is it possible to move [[Image:Barnard College, NYC IMG_0961.JPG]] so that it doesn't shove the contents box into the middle of the page? If the image shows the front of the main building, perhaps it could be incorporated into the infobox - if not, maybe it belongs further down. --Redrose64 (talk) 09:21, 15 August 2009 (UTC)

Advertisement? NPOV?[edit]

The current version does not seem at all like an ad to me, so I removed the Advert tag. The NPOV disputes that were raised on this talk page seem to have been resolved, so I did not put in an NPOV tag, but I am mentioning this here, in case someone else wants to insert one. Peter Chastain (talk) 11:17, 5 September 2009 (UTC)

Barnard degree is NOT 'awarded' by Columbia University[edit]

Here is the list of degrees awarded by Columbia University http://www.columbia.edu/cu/opir/abstract/degrees%20and%20certificates%20awarded%202007-2008.htm

Barnard very clearly states that "students earn the degree of [Columbia University.]" Your list of degrees is not very clear or to the point. Do you have additional evidence supporting your assertion? --ElKevbo (talk) 01:05, 30 September 2009 (UTC)


It does not matter what Barnard says. If Columbia says Barnard degree is not awarded by Columbia then Barnard degree is not awarded by Columbia. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 01:11, 30 September 2009 (UTC)

But you haven't established that is the case. Please find something more helpful than an obscure and incomprehensible table. --ElKevbo (talk) 01:15, 30 September 2009 (UTC)


Columbia University Office of the Registrar and Office of the Provost has no record of Barnard students. Columbia University has never stated that Barnard degree is awarded by Columbia. Please show me a statement "from Columbia University" saying Barnard degree is awarded by Columbia. Please find something more helpful and clear than obscure and incomprehensible sources. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 01:24, 30 September 2009 (UTC)

You still haven't shown us anything other than one table that isn't at all clear. Furthermore, I'm puzzled by your belligerence. --ElKevbo (talk) 01:29, 30 September 2009 (UTC)


You still have not shown us clear evidence that Barnard degree is Columbia degree. and Why do you care so much about this ?

I have seen Barnard graduates' diplomas. They are issued by Columbia and are signed by the presidents of both institutions. The large lettering at the top names Columbia, not Barnard, as the issuing institution. Barnard's president signs the diplomas in her role as a dean within the university, just as the deans of Columbia's constituent schools do. Every Barnard diploma that has ever been awarded is documentary proof -- issued by Columbia -- that Barnard graduates receive Columbia degrees. There is no such thing as a degree issued solely by Barnard.
What's more, when I graduated from Columbia, Barnard graduates marched and sat with graduates of the university's other divisions. Barnard's president presented the graduates to the president of the university, just as the deans of each of the other colleges and schools did with their students. The president of the university announced that he was conferring degrees upon the graduates whose deans had presented and recommended them -- including Barnard and Teachers College. The same thing happened at other commencements that I have attended. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.144.201.12 (talk) 01:51, 10 April 2010 (UTC)

Barnard graduates can NOT join Columbia University Alumni Association[edit]

Barnard graduates can NOT join Columbia University Alumni Association —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 00:42, 30 September 2009 (UTC)

The by-laws of the association make no mention of this. They state that "all persons having been enrolled as degree candidates for at least one year at Columbia University or having received any degree from COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY or having for at least one term been a member of the TRUSTEES OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK shall automatically be members of CAA and shall be eligible for membership in, and to hold any office within CAA." Given the above section that establishes that Barnard alumna receive Columbia degrees, this seems to imply that are eligible for membership.
Can you please provide a specific reference supporting your assertion? Further, can you please explain why in the world this is important or even interesting? --ElKevbo (talk) 01:13, 30 September 2009 (UTC)


Here is the link from Columbia University Alumni Association

https://alumni.columbia.edu/help/index.html#uni_pw_faq

Who is eligible for the Columbia Alumni Association (CAA) UNI-protected services? All graduates from Columbia University are eligible. Graduates from affiliate schools (Barnard, Teachers College, Union Theological Seminary, and Jewish Theological Seminary) are not eligible.


Barnard degree is not awarded by Columbia University and Barnard degree holders are not Columbia graduates. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 01:17, 30 September 2009 (UTC)

I don't see where that says that Barnard alumna are not eligible to join this organization, just which services they can use. A more clear and direct statement seems to be necessary. --ElKevbo (talk) 01:31, 30 September 2009 (UTC)


I don't know whether Barnard grads are eligible to join the CAA, but they definitely receive Columbia University degrees. You have obviously never seen the diplomas they receive (which clearly state that they are issued by Columbia and which are signed by both institutions' presidents) or attended a Columbia commencement (where Barnard's president and graduating students participate in exactly the same way as the deans and graduates of Columbia's constituent schools and colleges). Trust me on this one.


1) It says """Graduates from affiliate schools (Barnard, Teachers College, Union Theological Seminary, and Jewish Theological Seminary) are not eligible."""

2) If you know any Barnard graduate ask her if she can join CAA.

3) Look at page 22 of http://alumni.columbia.edu/connect/caa_conbylaws_2007.pdf Barnard Alumni Association is NOT part of CAA. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 01:48, 30 September 2009 (UTC)

Recent edits to the article[edit]

The recent edits to the article are argumentative and—if they turn out to be true, which has not yet been established—poorly written.

Please stop restoring the changes until they can be verified with verifiable reliable sources. Thank you. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 02:43, 30 September 2009 (UTC)

Please don't change my editing until reliable sources are provided. Thanks. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 02:58, 30 September 2009 (UTC)
That's not the way Wikipedia works. "The burden of evidence lies with the editor who adds or restores material." See WP:PROVEIT. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 03:45, 30 September 2009 (UTC)
As I wrote, Wkiwoman, the ball is in your court. Find some verifiable reliable sources, and write some reasonably sensible text. The material you keep reverting is nonsensical, argumentative, poorly written, and unencyclopedic. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 21:19, 4 October 2009 (UTC)
Some pertinent facts to ground the discussion:
From About Barnard
  • "A liberal arts college for women in New York City founded in 1889. Barnard has its own campus, faculty, administration, trustees, operating budget, and endowment."
  • "In 1900 it was included in the educational system of Columbia University with provisions unique among women's colleges: it was governed by its own trustees, faculty, and dean, and was responsible for its own endowment and facilities, while sharing instruction, the library, and the degree of the university."
  • "About 90% of Barnard students live in 11 Barnard residence halls and 4 Columbia residence halls;"
  • "most students take their meals either on Barnard's campus in Hewitt Cafeteria or on Columbia's campus at the John Jay Cafeteria."
  • "Barnard students compete in the NCAA Division I and the Ivy League through the Columbia/Barnard Athletic Consortium"
Course Catalog:
  • "Barnard is both an independently incorporated educational institution and an official college of Columbia University—a position that simultaneously affords it self-determination and a rich, value-enhancing partnership."
  • "The College grew out of the idea, first proposed by Columbia University’s tenth president, Frederick A.P. Barnard, that women have an opportunity for higher education at Columbia. Initially ignored, the idea led to the creation of a “Collegiate Course for Women.” Although highly-qualified women were authorized to follow a prescribed course of study leading ultimately to Columbia University degrees, no provision was made for where and how they were to pursue their studies. It was six years before Columbia’s trustees agreed to the establishment of a college for women."
  • "In 1900, Barnard was included in the educational system of Columbia University with provisions unique among women’s colleges: it was governed by its own Trustees, Faculty, and Dean, and was responsible for its own endowment and facilities, while sharing instruction, the library, and the degree of the University."
  • "In 1998, Barnard College and Columbia University amended and extended the longstanding agreement for cooperation between the institutions, an agreement which remains unique in higher education. Barnard stands as an independent college for women with its own curriculum, faculty, admissions standards, graduation requirements, trustees, endowment, and physical plant. At the same time, Barnard and Columbia share resources, thereby giving students open access to the courses, facilities, and libraries of both schools."
Given these facts, I would support the disputed assertion that "Barnard students receive a Columbia degree" even if they are substantially independent in other regards. This is only to say that the independence or affiliation between the institutions with other regards (alumni association, accreditation, etc.) cannot be used to establish the basis for "receiving a Columbia degree" because it is clearly a complex relationship. If Barnard says it's a Columbia degree, it's a Columbia degree. Madcoverboy (talk) 17:26, 6 October 2009 (UTC)


Columbia web sites say Barnard is NOT part of Columbia and Barnard degrees are not awarded by Columbia. It does not matter what Barnard says. Columbia University denies that Barnard is part of Columbia. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/opir/abstract/-- Barnard WAS included in the Columbia's education system, but not any more (Madcoverboy's claims are all written in PAST TENSE.) Wkiwoman (talk) 04:51, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

First, please stop making blanket reverts without edit summaries. Second, could you point out where that page says any such thing?
According to this page, the degrees come from the University. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 04:56, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

Please look at the following web site from Columbia University Office of the PROVOST http://www.columbia.edu/cu/opir/abstract/-- Columbia University NEVER says that Barnard degrees are awarded by Columibia. and Barnard is NOT official college nor school of Columbia. Barnard is an independent institution affiliated with Columbia —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 05:06, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

That page is the Columbia University Statistical Abstract. It doesn't say anything about who gets Columbia degrees. Do you mean this page: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/opir/abstract/degrees and certificates awarded 2008-2009.htm ? It doesn't mention Barnard, but Barnard's absence isn't proof of anything. You're "reading into" the chart something that isn't there. I showed you a page that says Barnard students got Columbia degrees (at least as of April 2001). Can you find anything that says the practice of Columbia issuing degrees to Barnard graduates has ended? — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 05:14, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

Barnard can claim anything they want. but Columbia NEVER agreed with Barnard's claim. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/opir/abstract/degrees%20and%20certificates%20awarded%202008-2009.htm In this link Barnard is NOT included in UNIVERSITY TOTAL.

Please show me Columbia's web site that says Barnard degrees are awarded by Columiba —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 05:20, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

I linked to it above. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 05:21, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

Please take a few moments to read the text of the article before you make another revert. The text you are reverting to says (a) Barnard graduates don't get Columbia degrees and (b) Barnard graduates do get Columbia degrees. It also says that Barnard has an "alumni" association, which it doesn't (it's an alumnae association). — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 05:21, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

I see you still haven't read the nonsense you're reverting to, and you're replacing sourced information with unsourced.
Your theory that Barnard's absence from the Columbia list indicates that Columbia doesn't issue degrees to Barnard graduates is an example of original research, and it's not allowed. As I wrote, find a source that says Barnard and Columbia changed their relationship and Columbia no longer issues degrees to Barnard graduates. As it has been for weeks, the ball is in your court. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 05:41, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

You still have not shown me any proof that Barnard degrees are awrded by Columbia. You only showed me one line from Barnard's promotional web site. Please show me official link that says Barnard degrees are awarded by Columbia. Here is another link that shows that Barnard is NOT official school of Columbia and Barnard degrees are NOT awarded by Columbia. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/opir/facts/FACTS2008.pdf —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 05:47, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

"One line from Barnard's promotional web site" is one line more than you have shown me. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 06:00, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

Please show me official sources only. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 06:08, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

This is becoming farcical. Wkiwoman, you can't move the goalposts every time we present evidence disproving your point. We have repeated statements from official sources explicitly stating that the Barnard awards a Columbia University degree. You have presented not a single source that explicitly states the opposite and you can't use a lack of evidence to demonstrate proof. If the edit warring and unproductive discussion persists, I'm going to recommend administrative action. Madcoverboy (talk) 22:43, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

I have shown you several sources, from Columbia University's official web site, which very clearly states that Columbia U do NOT award degreess to Barnard students. My sources include Columbia U Office of the Provost, Office of Planning and Research, Office of the Registrar, Columbia Univeristy Alumni Association.... etc.

You have NOT shown us any Columbia U documents stating that Barnard degrees are awarded by CU. It does not matter what Barnard claims. If Columbia Univeristy says no degrees are awarded to Barnard graduates, then NO DEGREES ARE AWARDED TO BARNARD GRADUATES--Wkiwoman (talk) 00:28, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

Please take off your CapsLock and stop shouting. You have yet to provide a single source that "says" Columbia doesn't provide degrees to Barnard graduates. What you've provided are sources that don't list Barnard graduates. The absence of Barnard from those lists is not evidence of anything. Find a specific statement that makes your point. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 03:48, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

Absence of Barnard degree on 'List of Degrees Awarded by Columbia U' is a clear meaning that Barnard degrees are not awarded by Columbia University (e.g. NYU degree is not on the list). You have NOT provide a single source that "says" Columbia award degrees to Barnard graduates from Columbia U web site. Barnard is not even one of colleges of Columbia.—Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 05:20, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

No, Barnard's absence from the list is clear evidence of ... Barnard's absence. Nothing more. I'm tired of going in circles. I told you at the top of this thread that the burden of proof was on you. You have not yet provided a single source that affirmatively supports your changes. Please spend less time shouting and more time looking for sources. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 05:49, 15 October 2009 (UTC)
Here's a 2009 Barnard Data Book (PDF format) that says "Barnard students receive a Columbia University degree" (p. 3 [page 7 of the PDF]). Here's a summary of the Columbia-Barnard Intercorporate Agreement that says "Barnard college degrees are officially granted by the Trustees of Columbia University, the same body that grants degrees to all Columbia students. This is despite Barnard's status as an affiliate school as opposed to an undergraduate school of the university itself." (Note that, because it's a wiki, this page is not considered a reliable source for Wikipedia purposes—but it demonstrates that you're wrong.) — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 06:08, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

Again those sources are from Barnard College ( & wiki are you serious ?). You have not yet provided a single source from Columbia University's official web site. Many of what Barnard claims are wrong. Barnard web site even claims that 'Barnard is official college of Columbia', which is completely wrong. Please provide a reliable source from Columbia University's official documents. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 13:30, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

Please read WP:BURDEN. You have the responsibility to prove that your statements are true, something I've been asking you to do for two weeks now. Please put up or shut up. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 21:41, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

Since you are claiming that Barnard degree is awarded by Columbia, please provide official source from Columbia University. You have not provided a single source from Columbia's official document. You should provide evidence from Columbia's web site for any claim involving Columbia. The entire Columbia U web site( which is really huge) never mentioned that Barnard degrees are awarded by Columbia. Barnard web site is full of wrong information ( therefore unreliable). For example, Barnard claims that Barnard college is official college of Columbia. However, Columbia's official web site denies such claim. http://www.columbia.edu/prospective_students/index.html http://www.studentaffairs.columbia.edu/admissions/university/academic Columbia University comprises three undergraduate colleges ... CC/SEAS/GS only. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 22:19, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

Please read WP:BURDEN. I've provided reliable sources that support my statements. You have yet to provide a single reliable source that supports yours. It's been more than two weeks. Put up or shut up. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 22:23, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

I have provided several official sources and you have not provided any evidence. If you want to claim somthing it should be accompanied by official and realiable source.--Wkiwoman (talk) 22:28, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

I'm not sure what your problem is, but I've provided several sources, and so has Madcoverboy. I've asked uninvolved Wikipedia editors to comment. It seems pointless to go on speaking with somebody as obviously detached from reality as you are. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 22:33, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

Please stop personal attack and use only official and reliable sources. I don't understand why you are keep using the unreliable sources. Barnard is not even official college of Columbia. (e.g. Barnard website claims that Barnard is Official College of Columbia but Columbia denies such claim) and, Since Columbia denies that Barnard is official college of Columbia,...... well.. everyone knows the anwer. --Wkiwoman (talk) 23:18, 15 October 2009 (UTC)


Wikiwoman is wrong. A particular document that does not list Barnard along with Columbia's other divisions does not amount to an official denial by the university that it awards Barnard degrees. I have seen Barnard diplomas, and I can verify that they are issued by the university. I graduated from Columbia, and I can verify that the president of Barnard presents and recommends her graduating seniors to the president of the university just as the deans of Columbia's constituent schools do, and that the university present then confers degrees on all of the students who have been so recommended -- including those who graduate from Barnard and from Teachers College. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.144.201.12 (talk) 02:08, 10 April 2010 (UTC)

stop edit warring, please.[edit]

I full-protected this article for a week in lieu of issuing WP:3RR warnings to the editors who have been actively reverting the article in recent days.

Please outline the problem and reach a consensus. I won't be watching this page, if consensus is reached before a week, come to my talk page so I can unprotect it. If the fighting continues, take it to the appropriate noticeboard and/or seek dispute resolution. tedder (talk) 07:04, 6 October 2009 (UTC)

I have protected the article again. Please discuss the issues on the talk page before making or requesting (via the {{editprotected}} template) any further changes to the article. Ask for a Wikipedia:Third opinion if needed. Continued edit warring and violation of the 3 revert rule (WP:3RR) is considered disruptive and may lead to having your editing privileges blocked. I hope this doesn't come to that. -- Tom N (tcncv) talk/contrib 06:22, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

RfC: Recent changes[edit]

There is an on-going dispute concerning Barnard's relationship with Columbia University. See this diff.

Please see #Recent edits to the article for details concerning the contentious matter of sources.

Any suggestions out of this mess would be appreciated. Thank you. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 21:54, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

On the sole issue of who gives the degrees, I saw that Wkiwoman was looking for proof from a reliable Columbia source. Perhaps this document, a Report from the Task force on Undergraduate Education from April of 2009. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/vpaa/docs/TFUE2009.pdf. Page 8 states that "The agreement includes a key provision which stipulates that Barnard students would receive a Columbia degree and be permitted to take upper-level courses at the University." Hopefully this document can help resolve the dispute and assure Wkiwoman that Barnard students do, in fact, get Columbia degrees. Best, Matan (talk) 03:19, 16 October 2009 (UTC)
Good find. That appears to be definitive on the issue of Columbia/Barnard degrees. --ElKevbo (talk) 03:32, 16 October 2009 (UTC)
Malik and I have both provided ample, reliable sources clearly and explicitly stating the Barnard degrees are awarded by Columbia University. It is increasingly clear that Wkiwoman is attempting to push not only push her (?) clear POV on the article, but a demonstrably incorrect one at that. Wkiwoman has repeatedly failed to demonstrate any factual basis for her argument and, if anything, the RfC should be over this editor's on-going conduct. Madcoverboy (talk) 03:55, 16 October 2009 (UTC)
I don't want to seem like a "sore winner", but why is a Columbia University source "better" than the multiple Barnard College sources that have been presented? A woman [i.e., women's college] can say something over and over, but it only becomes credible when a man says it? — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 04:44, 16 October 2009 (UTC)
Nah. I'm just hoping that since this is an incontrovertible Columbia source it will satisfy Wikiwoman and we can call move on with our lives and editing. :) --ElKevbo (talk) 05:04, 16 October 2009 (UTC)


When describing Barnard degree, we should note the following. 1) Barnard College is not official college of Columbia Univeristy. ( everyone accept this ?) 2) Barnard degrees are not recognized by Columbia University office of the Provost. (not listed on the 'Degrees awarded by Columbia University' 3) Barnard graduates can NOT join Columbia Univeristy Alumni Association(CAA). CAA Constitution and Bylaws states that 'All persons having been enrolled as degree candidates for at least one year at Columbia University or having received any degree from COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY or having for at least one term been a member of the TRUSTEES OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK shall automatically be members of CAA and shall be eligible for membership....' 4) Barnard students are never matricuated at Columbia U etc...

I also want to ask the meaning of 'receive a Columbia degree'. Honorary degree holders also 'receive a Columbia degree'. But honorary degree is not recognized as official degree of Columbia. Barnard degree is similar to Honorary degree ? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 05:16, 18 October 2009 (UTC)

No, Wkiwoman, we should not note that. This is an encyclopedia article about Barnard College. It isn't a polemic about what Barnard is not. If you have an axe to grind, take it somewhere else. — Malik Shabazz (talk · contribs) 05:28, 18 October 2009 (UTC)
Malik Shabazz Please stop personal attack. Wiki article is not a place for your personal opnions. We should include all neutral view of the barnard degree. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 15:04, 18 October 2009 (UTC)
All the official sources we've cited above specifically and explicitly contra-indicate every single point you've proposed. (1) "Barnard is both an independently incorporated educational institution and an official college of Columbia University"[1]; (2) "governed by its own trustees, faculty, and dean, and was responsible for its own endowment and facilities, while sharing instruction, the library, and the degree of the university." [2], (3) "All persons having been enrolled as degree candidates for at least one year at Columbia University or having received any degree from COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY... shall automatically be members of CAA and shall be eligible for membership in, and to hold any office within CAA" [3] and "All Columbia University Alumni, including degree-holders from Barnard College and Teachers College, are eligible for membership (in the Columbia Club), as well as current Columbia faculty and administrators, certificate holders, and full-time graduate and undergraduate students." [4]; (4) that's because Barnard has its own administration, trustees, etc. The only non-neutral view here is your on-going and completely unsubstantiated campaign to completely exclude Barnard from Columbia's identity. Madcoverboy (talk) 16:11, 18 October 2009 (UTC)
Wkiwoman, I join Malik Shabazz and Madcoverboy here. No one is attacking you personally. You are simply bringing a biased POV and ignoring citations proving you are wrong, citations that you yourself asked for. Best, Matan (talk) 18:43, 18 October 2009 (UTC)

Here is the official schools of Columbia University http://www.columbia.edu/prospective_students/index.html http://www.studentaffairs.columbia.edu/admissions/university/academic Barnard is NOT official school of Columbia but an affiliate of Columbia. --Wkiwoman (talk) 04:06, 19 October 2009 (UTC)

Do you even read what you write ? Please read again, Barnard graduates can NOT join Columbia University Alumni Association (CAA), because the membership reauires Columbia University degree. received any degree from COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY... shall automatically be members of CAA Barnard graduates can not automatically be members of CAA.

Columbia University Club is open to Non-degree students, certificate holders, staffs, etc. That is why Barnard graduates can join Columbia Club.--Wkiwoman (talk) 04:32, 19 October 2009 (UTC)

And you have still provided no positive evidence clearly documenting your asserted counterfactual. I'm done feeding this troll. Madcoverboy (talk) 04:58, 19 October 2009 (UTC)

Do you even know that Columbia University Club is different from Columbia Alumni association ? You manipulated the membership requirement of two different organizations(CAA vs. Club) and tricked us. Please provide honest and sincere response only. Or do you have difficulty understanding the difference between CAA and Club ? --Wkiwoman (talk) 05:20, 19 October 2009 (UTC)

Per this, a Barnard graduate, Pauline Lem, is a member of CAA's board. I think this settles the matter. Tim Song (talk) 03:09, 23 October 2009 (UTC)
Likewise, CAA recognizes Barnard College graduates as "Alumni Medalists" every year. 2009, 2008, 2007. Madcoverboy (talk) 06:25, 23 October 2009 (UTC)

One issue here is Wikiwoman is arguing that the lack of evidence from Columbia is evidence against the existence of evidence from Barnard. That is not how WP works; you need to find a source that directly contradicts the information. What Wikiwoman is arguing is WP:Original Research. She is saying, "This information is not listed on the Columbia website, so if they don't say it, then it isn't true." The only valid source that she could use is something from Columbia or elsewhere that specifically says, "Barnard degrees are not Columbia degrees." If there is something like that, then a more in-depth discussion of whether there is a copntroversy here should begin. Otherwise, I think the information provided by Madcoverboy and and Malik is properly sourced and not challenged by any directly verifiable information. Angryapathy (talk) 16:37, 23 October 2009 (UTC)

from Barnard's website as of when I write this: "Barnard students receive the diploma of the University signed by the presidents of both institutions,". "The University" refers to Columbia. Barnard is not referred to as a university but as a college, affiliated with Columbia University. I would consider this adequate proof of the degree emanating from Columbia as opposed to Barnard. No evidence that I have seen points to the contrary. Valley2city 03:42, 26 October 2009 (UTC)

Barnard degree is like honorary degree. Honorary degrees/Barnard degrees are conferred at the Columbia University commencement but both are not counted as official degree awarded by Columbia. Barnard is not even official school of Columbia http://www.columbia.edu/cu/opir/abstract/degrees%20and%20certificates%20awarded%202008-2009.htm —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 02:22, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

CAA Board is different from CAA. CAA Board membership does not require Columbia degree but CAA membership requires Columbia degree. Columbia degree holders become CAA member automatically. Is there any Barnard graduates who became CAA member automatically  ?

Alumni status are often given to non-degree holders. For example, participants at executive educaiton program at Business schools (including Harvard, Stanford, Columbia) receive Alumni status even if they don't receive degrees. Harvard medical school students who took MIT courses ( at HST program) receive MIT alumni status even if they don't get a degree from MIT (they even get alumni award from MIT). --Wkiwoman (talk) 02:35, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

Fine. "Barnard graduates are eligible to join the Columbia Alumni Association", from [5]. Tim Song (talk) 03:01, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

That is not official CAA web site. Official Web site says: All graduates from Columbia University are eligible. Graduates from affiliate schools (Barnard, Teachers College, Union Theological Seminary, and Jewish Theological Seminary) are not eligible. https://alumni.columbia.edu/help/index.html#uni_pw_faq —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 03:23, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

  • Are you actually suggesting that Barnard College affirmatively spread misinformation to her graduates? Especially a piece that is so easy to prove or disprove? BTW, you are quoting a section on receiving UNI-protected services, which is based on Columbia's IT system - Barnard students have their own system so it makes sense. This is obviously not the same as joining the CAA. Stop quoting material out of context. According to the Bible, Judas hanged himself (Matt. 27:5) and Jesus said “Go and do likewise” (Luke 10:37). Tim Song (talk) 03:48, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

Please read the sentence again. Barnard graduates don't belong to the category of All graduates from Columbia University —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 03:55, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

  • Exactly my point. You find one document that says "all Columbia graduates can join"; you find another, unrelated document, defining "all Columbia graduates" to exclude Barnard grads in a totally unrelated context - computer accounts! You then chain those together to claim that Barnard grads cannot join CAA. Classic original research by synthesis, and in this case not even right. Tim Song (talk) 04:04, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

If you know any Barnard graduate ask her if she is automatically member of CAA. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 04:07, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

I made two separate claims. First claim is about CAA membership. Second claim is about how CAA defined the category of 'All Columbia Graduates', to which Barnard does not belong. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 04:20, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

Out of patience[edit]

I can't speak for anyone else but I've lost patience with Wikiwoman. Her constantly-shifting goal posts, insistence on original research and synthesis, and unwillingness to accept that our bedrock here is not Truth but Verifiability make this a pointless conversation, IMHO. Additionally, her unwillingness to learn and follow community norms such as signing and indenting posts makes communication even more frustrating and difficult.

What makes this even more frustrating is that buried in Wikiwoman's arguments is a kernel of truth that is being lost: the relationship between Columbia and Barnard (and presumably Teacher's College and the other similar units) is complex and a bit confusing. Some of the sources we've located in this discussion do appear to contradict one another or at least add more confusion than clarity. I'm afraid that as we have resisted Wikiwoman's ever-shifting and frustrating arguments we have erred on the opposite extreme position from hers when the answer lies somewhere in the middle.

I am relatively comfortable with how the article stands on this issue right now. But I recommend letting this lie for a few weeks as we all withdraw so we can return with a fresh perspective and open minds. --ElKevbo (talk) 04:27, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

Your major source, the Barnard web site, is full of wrong info. For example, Barnard web site claims that Barnard is 'official college of Columbia'. This is wrong. Columbia University officially acknowledgs only three undergraduate schools, CC,SEAS, and GS. http://www.columbia.edu/prospective_students/index.html

Please provide verifiable and reliable sources only. Web sites with wrong info is not acceptable. --Wkiwoman (talk) 17:02, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

Wikipedia is not the place to right Great Wrongstm or promote The Truthtm. If Barnard's official website were not a reliable source of information about Barnard, why is Columbia's official website better? Or, are you saying that Columbia tolerated such a obvious falsehood? Tim Song (talk) 17:12, 28 October 2009 (UTC)


Are you claiming that 'Barnard is official college of Columbia University' is a true statment ??? Columbia denies the Barnard's claim. http://www.studentaffairs.columbia.edu/admissions/university/academic Only three schools(CC,SEAS,GS) are recongnized as official undergrad schools of Columbia. --Wkiwoman (talk) 17:15, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

I've reported Wkiwoman's continuing edit warring in the hopes that she is blocked or otherwise dissuaded from continuing to edit war. --ElKevbo (talk) 17:23, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

The truth #1 about Barnard is that : Barnard is NOT official college of Columbia University. It should be included at the article. Everyone accept this ? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 17:41, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

No. First, the article is not "what Barnard is not"; second, you have yet to cite a reliable source unaccompanied by original research. Tim Song (talk) 20:27, 29 October 2009 (UTC)

Motion to close[edit]

It seems to me that the consensus is quite clear. By my count, 7 out of 8 editors who commented reject Wkiwoman's position; the lone exception being themselves. Can we close this RFC? Tim Song (talk) 20:27, 29 October 2009 (UTC)

Support closing and additionally move to remind editors not to feed the troll. Madcoverboy (talk) 22:41, 29 October 2009 (UTC)

Sorry to interrupt your spat[edit]

Would somebody please insert a redlink for Jessie Wallace Hughan — I'm getting ready to write her bio tomorrow. Carrite (talk) 03:07, 20 October 2009 (UTC)

It's actually a blue link now. Look how much effort you all have wasted on this talk page. It's sad. Carrite (talk) 16:26, 20 October 2009 (UTC)

Current page protection[edit]

As a result of activity on 28 October, I reinstated full protection of this article to prevent further edit waring until the issues are resolved. Although I in no way defend wikiwoman's mode of operation, I do see what appears to be some inconsistencies and subtleties that should not be ignored. That is why I have not yet imposed a block.

I see that there is now a motion to close the RFC above, but I do not see a clear statement of consensus. I think it would be wise to summarize the key questions along with brief statements of the proposed consensus position. That way, any further editing that is performed that conflicts with that consensus can be more clearly evaluated by others so that appropriate action can be taken. Once consensus is documented, I (or another admin) will unprotect the article. (I can also unprotected it sooner, if asked.)

That said, I would also encourage the editors involved here to continue to explore the issues with an open mind, understanding that not everything is black and white. For example, there may be subtle differences between a "Columbia degree", a degree awarded by Columbia (or its trustees), and a degree awarded by Barnard but authorized by Columbia. Also, the similarities and differences between Barnard diplomas and those of other Columbia member colleges or affiliates may be of interest. Since, the relationship between Barnard and Columbia seems to be a topic of particular interest, perhaps it warrants its own section, where different aspects of the relationship and any apparent inconsistencies can be discussed. I personally do not think there is anything wrong with acknowledging that sources conflict or are inconsistent. Of course, any potentially controversial changes should first be discussed here and I'd strongly suggest that other edits strictly follow the WP:BRD process. -- Tom N (tcncv) talk/contrib 00:10, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

I assume that you'll be recusing yourself from further action related to this article now that you are explicitly involved with it. --ElKevbo (talk) 00:14, 30 October 2009 (UTC)
As requested, I recuse myself and will take no further action. If you would like protection removed from this article, you can post a request at WP:RFPP#Current requests for unprotection. Another admin will evaluate the request. -- Tom N (tcncv) talk/contrib 00:45, 30 October 2009 (UTC)
I don't see any harm in letting the clock run out. No hurry. --ElKevbo (talk) 00:55, 30 October 2009 (UTC)
I don’t know how a statement of consensus needs to be written or supported, so I recommend this one:
Following an editing war in October of 2009, a consensus has been found that Barnard degrees are awarded by the Trustees of Columbia University, and that its students are members of the Columbia community, as described in the Barnard Columbia Affiliation Agreement.
Best, Matan (talk) 02:20, 5 November 2009 (UTC)
Does anyone have any feedback? I would love for us to reach a state of consensus. Best, Matan (talk) 16:11, 13 November 2009 (UTC)

Barnard graduates can NOT join Columbia University Alumni Association (CAA), because CAA requires Columbia degree. --Wkiwoman (talk) 07:06, 24 November 2009 (UTC)

No Wkiwoman, Barnard maintains its own alumni database, but that does not mean that Barnard graduates do not get a Columbia degree. Matan (talk) 12:40, 24 November 2009 (UTC)


No, Do you know what CAA is ? Columbia UNIVERSITY alumni association. Columbia degree holders are members of CAA AUTOMATICALLY. That is why Barnard graduates can NOT join CAA. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wkiwoman (talkcontribs) 03:09, 25 November 2009 (UTC)

Wkiwoman, first, yelling through the use of upper case letters does not make your argument any more persuasive. Second, it would really help us all if you followed community guidelines such as indenting and signing your comments. Third, Barnard maintains its own alumni database, which is why Barnard alumna are not part of the CAA. That does not mean that Barnard is not part of Columbia University. Fourth, the edits you are making are comprised of two parts: 1) saying that Barnard alumna are not part of the University, and 2) removing the section that maintain that Barnard faculty are subject to the University's tenure process. Not only have you not convinced us of your arguments regarding the CAA, but you have also produced no verifiable sources that justify the removal of the tenure section. Please read this Columbia webpage which is maintained by the office of the Vice President of Arts and Sciences office, and which outlines the tenure process for University faculty, including Barnard faculty and excluding Law and TC faculty: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/vpaa/docs/tenframe.html. For these reasons, I am reverting the changes you made to the article. Please present verifiable evidence rather than just make changes. Best, Matan (talk) 22:15, 25 November 2009 (UTC)

Please provide only reliable sources and stop posting false and irrelevent informations (e.g. tenure process).

Columbia College has its own alumni association and it is automatically part of CAA. SEAS has its own alumnit association and it is also automatically part of CAA. GS has its alumni associaiton and it is also automatically part of CAA.

Each of Columbia schools has its own alumni association and simultaneously part of CAA. Each Columbia graduate belong to his/her own school alumni association and automatically becomes memeber of CAA.

Barnard has separate alumni association but it is NOT part of CAA, because only Columbia graduates can be a member of CAA.

--Wkiwoman (talk) 05:55, 27 November 2009 (UTC) No You still don't understand

Dress code[edit]

The article implies that the dress code is still in effect, since it does not report on the end of the dress code. It also appears to be POV=pushing by describing the overcoat in terms of a jilbab. As a matter of historic fact, I believe that a simple ordinary dress that extended beyond the knee was sufficient attire, and that a jibab was not required. I have search the University website and have googled Barnard College Dress Code without locating any present-day dress code. Could we clear up this confusion before prospective students drop Barnard from consideration because they don't own jibabs? Thanks. Racepacket (talk) 13:00, 19 November 2009 (UTC)

Alumni Association[edit]

Just to satisfy myself, because the various webpages are unclear, I contacted the Columbia Alumni Association (CAA) and they responded that Columbia and Barnard maintain separate alumni data bases. A Barnard alumnus would be generally welcomed to attend a CAA event, but that they are not automatic CAA members. I have forwarded the email to the OTRS so that Wikipedia could have a record of this. Ticket#2009111910070021 I hope this helps resolve some of the confusion underlying the recent dispute. Thanks. Racepacket (talk) 20:26, 19 November 2009 (UTC)

AFAIK there is no such thing as a Barnard alumnus. :) Tim Song (talk) 05:30, 21 November 2009 (UTC)


Barnard College is a part of Columbia University[edit]

I hope this helps settle this debate. "Two affiliated institutions – Barnard College and Teachers College – are also Faculties of the University" [6] --Viscountrapier (talk) 23:12, 12 February 2010 (UTC)

NOPE

Here are list of Columbia undergraduate degrees awarded

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/opir/abstract/degrees%20and%20certificates%20awarded%202008-2009.htm

Barnard degrees are not recognized by Columbia degree by the Office of the Provost and Registrar--

This will clearly settle this debate. Visio1234 (talk) 03:50, 15 February 2010 (UTC)--Visio1234 (talk) 03:50, 15 February 2010 (UTC)

There is no debate, and if you try to start one you will be blocked just as your sockpuppets have been. — Malik Shabazz Talk/Stalk 04:15, 15 February 2010 (UTC)

@ Visico1234. The reason for the confusion is the affiliation agreements between Columbia "The University" and two of it's independent institutions. All parties want to eat and have their cake at the same time. So while Columbia merged with Barnard and TC, the independent institutions wanted to have some control over their affairs. The relationship between Columbia and Barnard is very similar to the relationship between The United States and Puerto Rico (Puerto Ricans are US citizens and are issued US passports but are not allowed to vote in the Presidential election of have voting seats in congress) [[7]]. This is very similar to some CAA services not offered to Barnard students. To answer your question. (1)Barnard students receive Columbia University Degrees [8] (See paragraph 8 of subsection 2). I hope this was helpful --Viscountrapier (talk) 16:54, 16 February 2010 (UTC)

Columbia never "merged" with either Barnard or TC. Both are still independent institutions. But they also have close contractual relationships with the university. These contracts state that Columbia will award degrees to graduates of Barnard and TC. That is what the contracts require, and it is what happens in reality.
The document on which Wikiwoman relies is a statistical report about how many people graduate from each of the sixteen colleges and schools that Columbia does own. It says nothing about graduates of the two colleges that Columbia does not own. Columbia needs information like this for purposes of budgeting, accreditation, etc. But Barnard and TC each have their own budgets, and each handles its own accreditation. Adding their numbers to the report would be pointless, since they would not further the purpose for which the report was created. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.144.201.12 (talk) 02:17, 10 April 2010 (UTC)

Barnard grads are not member of Columbia Univeristy Alumni Association[edit]

I checked with Columbia University Alumni Association (CAA), and they said Barnard degrees are not Columbia degree and thus Barnard graduates can not join CAA. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Visio1234 (talkcontribs) 04:00, 15 February 2010 (UTC)

Nobody cares. — Malik Shabazz Talk/Stalk 04:15, 15 February 2010 (UTC)
Clearly you care --Visio1234 (talk) 04:28, 15 February 2010 (UTC)

LOL @ Visio1234. You can believe what ever you want. Even a monkey knows the meaning of the word faculty. LOL. I mean it is there in black and white and you still throwing this CAA crap around. And please stop telling TALL tales…you never spoke to anyone at the CAA. LOL. --69.140.196.143 (talk) 06:29, 16 February 2010 (UTC)

Barnard, Columbia and all the confusion[edit]

@ Visico1234. The reason for the confusion is the affiliation agreements between Columbia "The University" and two of it's independent institutions. All parties want to eat and have their cake at the same time. So while Columbia merged with Barnard and TC, the independent institutions wanted to have some control over their affairs (In the end it is all about the money. The relationship between Columbia and Barnard is very similar to the relationship between The United States and Puerto Rico (Puerto Ricans are US citizens and are issued US passports but are not allowed to vote in the Presidential election or have voting seats in congress) [[9]]. This is very similar to some CAA services not offered to Barnard students. To answer your question. (1)Barnard students receive Columbia University Degrees [10] (See paragraph 8 of subsection 2)--Viscountrapier (talk) 17:10, 16 February 2010 (UTC)

Columbia never "merged" with either Barnard or TC. Both are still independent institutions. But they also have close contractual relationships with the university. These contracts state that Columbia will award degrees to graduates of Barnard and TC. That is what the contracts require, and it is what happens in reality.
The document on which Wikiwoman relies is a statistical report about how many people graduate from each of the sixteen colleges and schools that Columbia does own. It says nothing about graduates of the two colleges that Columbia does not own. Columbia needs information like this for purposes of budgeting, accreditation, etc. But Barnard and TC each have their own budgets, and each handles its own accreditation. Adding their numbers to the report would be pointless, since they would not further the purpose for which the report was created.

Also as a person who is very familiar with the workings of the CAA I can tell you this. Barnard graduates receive Columbia Degrees[11] Section 8 or subsection 2. Based on the bylaws of the CAA all persons that receive/are awarded/ are conferred (whatever you want to call it means the same thing) Columbia degrees are members of the CAA. (Article 3)[12]. Nevertheless since Barnard remains financially and administratively independent from the "University" it keeps it own alumni databased separately from the University. Remember that no where on the CAA website does it state that Barnard are not members of CAA. What is stated is that Barnard graduates are not eligible for certain services offered by CAA. --Viscountrapier (talk) 17:10, 16 February 2010 (UTC)

This is statement is from the CAA website "Alumni e-mail service is available two to three months after graduation; during this period, alumni will continue to have access to their student e-mail accounts. Please note: graduates of affiliate schools are not currently eligible for this service. Affiliate school services can be found on the CUIT Web site." [13]. It does not say that affiliated institution graduates are not member of CAA...it states that affiliated institution graduates are currently not eligible for CAA email forwarding service but can get the same service from the Columbia University Information Technology department (CUIT). --Viscountrapier (talk) 18:47, 16 February 2010 (UTC)

Officially Barnard is NOT part of Columbia[edit]

Viscountrapier ! Columbia Barnard never merged.

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,955006,00.html

According to this official announcement, Columbia-Barnard merge failed. Columbia and Barnard became two separate institution with special relationship. --

For exampl, before 1982 children of Barnard grad received legacy status when applying to Columbia . After 1982, they no longer receive legacy status


Visio1234 (talk) 01:01, 17 February 2010 (UTC)

Viscountrapier ! Your link [1] does NOT say Barnard degree is Columbia degree. Please read again.

Look at this CAA Bylaws and Constitution [2] page 22 LIST OF AFFILIATED ASSOCIATIONS All Columbia schools are listed and Barnard is not there. I contacted CAA many times, and CAA alwasys say Barnard grads can NOT be a member of CAA because Barnard degree is not Columbia degree.

You should note that Barnard degree is NOT considered as columbia degree by 1) Columbia University Alumni Association. 2) Columbia University Office of the Provost 3) Columbia University Office of the Registrar 4) COlumbia University Office of the Career Service, 5) Columbia University Undergraduate student affairs. 6) Columbia University Undergraduate Admissions Office etc.... —Preceding unsigned comment added by Visio1234 (talkcontribs) 01:14, 17 February 2010 (UTC)

@Visio1234 I understand your point but you have offered no evidence that explicitly states that (1) Barnard grads do not receive Columbia Degrees. (2) That Barnard is not a member of CAA. Post such a link and we will add it to the main article. As prescribed by the affiliation agreement Columbia and Barnard keep to separate records and Barnard numbers are not included in Columbia general number. I know none exist but if you have any evidence that states and supports your opinion please post it but until such a time the main article will read for the world to see that Barnard students are an intricate part of Columbia University and receive, are awarded, are conferred Columbia Degrees. --Viscountrapier (talk) 15:26, 17 February 2010 (UTC)

By the way when I went to Columbia Law School and I work for Columbia University--Viscountrapier (talk) 15:39, 17 February 2010 (UTC)

Supporting evidence(s) from official sources that Barnard (is a part) or (is not a part) of Columbia University[edit]

In support of the (is a part argument)

(1) As stated by the Barnard College Catalog (Paragraph 2 of first webpage) "Barnard is both an independently incorporated educational institution and an official college of Columbia University—a position that simultaneously affords it self-determination and a rich, value-enhancing partnership. Barnard students may take classes at Columbia and benefit from the University’s academic resources, as Columbia students may do at Barnard". [14] --Viscountrapier (talk) 15:50, 17 February 2010 (UTC)

@ Visio1234. It is there in black and white and written in the English language. So unless (1) Barnard is lying or (2) the link is a masterful fake, your previous arguments hold no water. Now if you have any official evidence(s) that explicitly (in wording) support your claim please post them. --Viscountrapier (talk) 15:56, 17 February 2010 (UTC)

Reply to (1) http://www.studentaffairs.columbia.edu/admissions/university/academic

This is the official Columbia Undergraduate web site and it says Columbia University comprises three undergraduate colleges and one close affiliate. Columbia College and The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science are both served by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. The School of General Studies, is Columbia’s college for returning and nontraditional students. ... Barnard College, the closely affiliated but independent women’s college across the street also has an entirely separate admissions and application process.

Only three undergraduate college (CC/SEAS/GS) are recognized as official colleges by Columbia University. Barnard is recognized as affiliate independent college which is separate from Columbia University. Barnard is certainly not official college of columbia university, but an closely affiliated independent college of Columbia U.

Didn't I already show that the merge between BC and CU failed and they became two separate institution ?

One of the web sites is lying.. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Visio1234 (talkcontribs) 22:42, 18 February 2010 (UTC)

@ Visio1234. Great argument on your part and I think you are also correct. Basically I think we are both correct. The big mess is the complicity of the affiliation agreement between Columbia and Barnard. I will try to get a copy and post it. It clearly states the roles and relationship between the University and the college. The fail merger you talk about was the plan to incorporate Bernard financial and administrative functions into Columbia. Barnard since inception has always been simi-autonomous. The relationship between Barnard and Columbia is still the same since inception. And the only difference between Columbia undergraduate schools and Barnard is administrative. --Viscountrapier (talk) 16:28, 19 February 2010 (UTC)


@Viscount: Thanks for the info. But God himself could come down and tell them that Barnard College was a college of Columbia University and they would still refuse to accept it. I mean they are morons.

@Visio1234 : LOL LOL LOL. You just got schooled ! LOL —Preceding unsigned comment added by 207.188.228.210 (talk) 18:58, 17 February 2010 (UTC)


The language on which Visio1234 relies does not mean what he(?) thinks it means. Three undergraduate schools -- Columbia Collge, The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science and the School of General Studies -- are owned by Columbia University. Barnard College is independent; it is not Columbia's property. But it most definitely is recognized as one of Columbia's colleges. That recognition stems from a contract rather than from outright ownership, but it is real nonetheless. Barnard's faculty are officially one of the faculties of the university. Barnard's professors cannot receive tenure unless and until they are approved by Columbia. Professors at Barnard can supervise Columbia Ph.D. dissertations, teach graduate courses at the university and head university research centers and institutes. Barnard's students play on Columbia sports teams. Instead of maintaining its own research library, Barnard pays a fee to Columbia to help develop the university's libraries while Barnard maintains only a modest collection of its own. (Barnard's campus does not have room for a major research library.) And yes, Barnard's graduates receive Columbia degrees. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.144.201.12 (talk) 02:27, 10 April 2010 (UTC)

Columbia University Charter and highlights from the University agreement with Barnard College[edit]

@Visio1234. This should without a doubt settle the issue. This is Columnbia University's Charter (Amended 2005) . Also as you read remember that Columbia College and Columbia University are two different entities.

XXIII BARNARD COLLEGE: The following statutes are enacted in accordance with the terms of theagreement between the University and Barnard College, dated as of July1, 1973, and as amended through June 17, 1993 (“the Agreement”).§230. President of the University The President of the Univer-sity shall be ex officio a Trustee of the college. He shall exercise suchsupervision and direction of the college as will promote the effectivecoordination of its activities with the other activities of the University,and may perform such acts as shall in his judgment promote theinterests of the college and as shall not contravene the college’s Char-ter, as amended, or the provisions of the Agreement. As occasion mayrequire, he may present, through the president of the college, mattersfor the consideration of the Trustees or faculty of the college. He mayattend meetings of the faculty of the college and shall receive copiesof the minutes of all its meetings.§231. President and dean of Barnard CollegeThe internal administration of the college shall be conducted by apresident, with the rank of dean in the University, who shall beappointed by the Trustees of the college with the advice and consentof the President of the University. In the absence of the president ofthe college, an acting president may be appointed by the Trustees ofthe college.§232. Representation in the University SenateThe college shall be represented in the University Senate by suchmembers as shall be provided from time to time by these Statutes.§233. Faculty The faculty of the college shall consist of the pres-ident of the college and such officers of instruction as shall from timeto time be appointed and reappointed by the University in accordancewith Section 234

§235. Degree: The college will continue to admit and recommendwomen for the degree of bachelor of arts. The University will confer the degree of bachelor of arts upon the students of the college who shall have satisfactorily fulfilled in the college the requirements of the University for that degree. To the extent permitted by these Statutes, all requirements for admission and the degree of bachelor of arts for students registered in the college shall be determined by the faculty of the college. The diploma shall be signed by the President of the University and by the president of the college. The degree of bachelor of arts conferred upon the graduates of Barnard College shall be maintained at all times as a degree of equal value with the degree of bachelor of arts conferred upon the graduates of Columbia College. The equivalency of the degrees shall be maintained in such manner as the University Senate may prescribe. Students of both the college and the University shall have common access to courses BARNARD COLLEGE offered by the college or the University, subject only to normal pre-requisites and to such exceptions as may be designated by therespective committees on instruction of the college and the variousdivisions of the University, with the goals of increasing coeducationand of enhancing the quality of undergraduate education at both insti-tutions by common access to faculty and courses and joint utilizationof facilities between the college and the University. The University shall grant no degree of bachelor of arts to women except upon stu-dents of Barnard College and upon students of the School of General Studies to the extent permitted under the terms of the Agreementbetween the University and the college, as it now exists or as it mayhereafter be amended from time to time. (To view the full document please click here [15] --Viscountrapier (talk) 19:04, 19 February 2010 (UTC)


Your link confirms that Barnard College is independent and separate from Columbia U. That is why 'agreement' is needed. For example, BC has its own trustee and the president of BC is appointed by the Trustee of BC ( not by CU). Whereas CC/SEAS deans are appointed( and fired) by CU president. That is why banard is an affiliated institution (not an official college of CU) --Visio1234 (talk) 03:10, 20 February 2010 (UTC)

@viscountrapier....why are you wasting your time trying to reason with an idiot. I read the the Charter you posted and even a blind monkey can see that Barnard is part of Columbia. Please stop wasting your time with idiots. The Barnard wiki page states that Barnard is an independently incorporated women's liberal arts college and an official college of Columbia University and that's all that matters. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.140.196.143 (talk) 03:27, 20 February 2010 (UTC)


LOL LOL. Idiot !! (69.140.196.143) You are the one with monkey brain. Barnard is not part of Columbia. According to the Bible, Judas hanged himself (Matt. 27:5) and Jesus said “Go and do likewise” (Luke 10:37). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 95.211.27.5 (talk) 04:17, 20 February 2010 (UTC)

OK OK. I thought this was going to be civil ? There is no need for name calling.

@ Visio1234 and (95.211.27.5) As long as Barnard College website keeps stating that Barnard College is an official college of Columbia University Wikipedia will keep that statement on its Barnard page. To change it we need facts and not personal opinions. The evidence at hand (Barnard website and Columbia university Charter ) supports Barnard claim. If you have any evidence that is as specific as the Barnard website or Columbia University's Charter please post it. --Viscountrapier (talk) 16:16, 23 February 2010 (UTC)


New Baranrd website no longer says Barnard is official college of Columbia U. Now it says there is 'partnership' between Baranrd college and Columbis University. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Kopimama (talkcontribs) 19:15, 10 February 2011 (UTC)

I've updated the URLs for the cites, and have been reverting Kopimama's attempts to change the language into uncited form. I don't want to risk WP:3RR so would appreciate assistance here. YLee (talk) 04:20, 11 February 2011 (UTC)

"Most selective"[edit]

The article says:

Barnard College considers itself the most selective women's college in the nation. [16]

To which an IP editor appended the comment "This article does not state that Barnard College considers itself the most selective women's college, only that it is the most selective year for Barnard only". He or she is right; that is what the source says.

I'll try to find a source that supports what our article says, but it may be a couple of days. If somebody else finds something first, that would be great. — Malik Shabazz Talk/Stalk 01:42, 12 March 2010 (UTC)

Never mind. I found this news article about a Barnard press release, which says "Barnard remains the most selective women's college, according to the release." — Malik Shabazz Talk/Stalk 02:31, 12 March 2010 (UTC)
Press releases from the self-same don't pass the smell test for reliable sources in my book. Even if a non-original research, reliable third party citation could be mustered, the distinction as to being the "most selective" is naked puffery and boosterism and has no place in this or any article. If the authors of the article want to make claims about "selectivity", they are free to neutrally report the number of applications, number\percentage admitted, as well as the number\percentage matriculated and number\percentage retained in the second year so that the reader may make his or her own judgments as to the selectivity of the institution. Madcoverboy (talk) 05:42, 12 March 2010 (UTC)

New section on the Columbia-Barnard relationship[edit]

I created a new section in the article to collect the disparate discussions of the relationship that were all over the article, especially in the then far too-long summary. Given the lengthy debate above, it's important that the article's discussion o the relationship be a) centralized, b) free of redundancy, and c) clear. YLee (talk) 09:28, 1 April 2010 (UTC)


New Barnard web site does not say Columbia awards barnad degree. All Barnard graduates are identified as 'B.A. Barnard' http://www.barnard.edu/catalogue/directory/faculty --Kopimama (talk) 05:39, 12 February 2011 (UTC)


Barnard'w new web site removed the word 'Barnard College of Columbia Univeristy'. Does this mean Barnard is not part of Columbia? Columbia University recognized only three undergrad schools CC/SEAS/GS. http://www.columbia.edu/content/statistics-facts.html--Kopimama (talk) 05:48, 12 February 2011 (UTC)

I've added two more cites, from the Columbia faculty handbook and an academic journal, that offer yet more (!) views on the Columbia-Barnard relationship. Ylee (talk) 19:06, 5 July 2012 (UTC)

Unsourced tensions[edit]

One or more unregistered editors have repeatedly added a paragraph alleging tensions between Barnard and Columbia. Another editor and I have repeatedly removed this paragraph as it lacks sources. I don't have an objection to the content of the paragraph, just to including in this (or any other article) without any sources. WP:V is a cornerstone of Wikipedia and it's not negotiable so please find some reliable sources if you'd like to include this information. ElKevbo (talk) 05:42, 4 May 2012 (UTC)

Dorothy Irene Height admission denial[edit]

Someone removed the comment in "controveries" concerning the former racial policies of the College. It had been mentioned that Dorothy Irene Height (March 24, 1912 – April 20, 2010)[ was denied admission after learning she was black. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 23.30.189.3 (talk) 17:36, 24 March 2014 (UTC)

I removed it. Please supply reliable sources if you want to include information in an encyclopedia article. ElKevbo (talk) 17:55, 24 March 2014 (UTC)