Talk:Bashkirs

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There was a mistake that I corrected: European travellers Joannes de Plano Carpini and William of Rubruquis asserted that Pascatirs spoke the same language as the Hungarians, and not as the Bulgarians (who were their neighbours).

See William of Rubruquis'Account of the Mongols:

Of the riuer of Iagac [Marginal note: Or, Iaic.]: and of diuers regions or nations. Chap. 23.

[Iaic twelue dayes iourney from Volga. Pascatir.] Hauing traueiled twelue dayes iourney from Etilia, wee fonnd a mightie riuer called Iagac: which riuer issuing out of the North, from the land of Pascatir, descendeth into the foresaid sea. The language of Pascatir, and of the Hungarians is all one, and they are all of them shepheards, not hauing any cities. And their countrey bordereth vpon Bulgaria the greater, on the West frontier thereof. From the Northeast part of the said countrey, there is no citie at all. For Bulgaria the greater is the farthest countrey that way, that hath any citie therein. [The Hungarians descended from the Bascirdes.] Out of the forenamed region of Pascatir, proceeded the Hunnes of olde time, who afterwarde were called Hungarians. Next vnto it is Bulgaria the greater.

http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/h/hakluyt/voyages/rubruquis/chapter2.html

Hungarians were often called Turks (but never Bulgars), though their language is not related to the Turkic languages. Today some scientists deny the Hungarian ancestry of Bashkirs, although it is highly unprobable that Rubruquis (who met in his journey many Hungarian prisoners from Hungary) could mistaken Hungarian language to a Turkic language.

"related groups" info removed from infobox[edit]

For dedicated editors of this page: The "Related Groups" info was removed from all {{Infobox Ethnic group}} infoboxes. Comments may be left on the Ethnic groups talk page. Ling.Nut 21:00, 19 May 2007 (UTC)

Bashkort is correct[edit]

I have put also "Bashkort" as the name. "Bashkir" is a Russian word to call Bashkort. This people say "Bashkort", when talking to each other.Maybe when talking to Russians, they will say "Bashkir". If a Bashkort say "Bashkir" to another Bashkort, he is called "Mankurt" (russian wannabe) --Ramil MC 15:05, 3 November 2007 (UTC)

The correct form will be Bashqort, not Bashkort. At the second, Bashkir is a form, traditional for English language. The usage of Bashkir does not depend of Bashkir's bein mañqort. I hope you are not mañqort. :) But it doesn't mean you should change English spelling --Üñţïf̣ļëŗ (see also:ә? Ә!) 22:46, 3 November 2007 (UTC)

Bashkirs Hungarians relations[edit]

whats the nonsense here?? --fz22 (talk) 06:47, 11 June 2008 (UTC)

"Arheologija i etnografija Baskirii" published around 1960 (i've read its hungarian version)

the Baskhir-Hungarian deserved to be mentioned here ... i think.

According to the Hungarian standpoint: - Arab, Byzantine, Western European geographers reffered the Magyars as Bashkirs. - The early Magyars had three names given by their neighbours: (Turks/Bashkirs/Ungri = Byzantine/Volga Bulgars/Slavic peoples) - there are several coincidence in tribal names: Gyarmat = Jurmat; Jeno=Jenej; Magyar=Majar, Mozsarjan; Megyer=Miser - Friar Julian journeys - the Mongol invasion in Mid 13ht century destroyed Volga Bulgaria and the Magyar-Baskhirs as well. Our present-day Bashkirs orgin therefore is still uncertain ... --fz22 (talk) 09:10, 25 June 2008 (UTC)

Language[edit]

According to most sources Bashkirs were Maygars who under influences of their Turki neighbours began speaking their present language. But when the switch of languuage took place ? Kaşgarlı Mahmut (1005-1102) lists them as Turk. But Giovanni da Pian del Carpine (1180-1252) notes that they speak Hungarian. Isn't there a contradiction ? Nedim Ardoğa (talk) 11:10, 10 October 2009 (UTC)

File:Bashkort Kuresh.jpg Nominated for Deletion[edit]

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meaning[edit]

maybe it means bozkurt. (Grey Wolves, a Turkish far-right wing organisation) maybe the legend of bozkurt and Bashkirs are the same? what you think? (i dont like the bozkurts, just saying) 88.64.182.125 (talk) 02:55, 5 April 2012 (UTC)

File:Bashkort Girls.jpg Nominated for Deletion[edit]

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Ethnogenesis[edit]

Why is the spread of haplogroup r1b associated with the Bashkirs Andronovo culture?

For example, the Bashkir tribe Burzyan, in the settlement of which is common to the M269, natives of Turkmenistan (they left it in the opinion of Bashkir scientists in the 8-9 century). And when you consider that about 2,000 years ago, there (in Turkmenistan) moved soldiers who served in the Roman legion Marcus Licinius Crassus, you are left with no doubt that the Bashkirs are descendants of the Romans :) Bikkulov (talk) 14:00, 25 August 2012 (UTC)

Bashkirs' origins[edit]

The article states that they are some sort of "Turkic" people, but the language is from Ugro-Finnish family. However, the genetic map of Bashkirs tells entirely different story. R1a is the most dominant and prevalent genetic group, distantly followed by R1b. Both are Slavic genes making up 95% of total population, so there could be a couple of possible scenarios here that had developed during the millennia: There may have been Turkic or Persian tribes migrating to the area under the name Bashkirs. The nomenclature "Turkic languages" in itself is wrong as all languages and dialects in that group actually belong to the Persian languages family. Turkish itself has strong roots in Pashtun and Farsi. However, at some point The Bashkirs and Slavs had met and occupied the same territory. It is fairly typical for Slavic tribes to settle in an area and accept the local names, like Slavs in Macedonia and Bulgaria, or in Denmark, for example. However their assimilation normally stops there. They preserve the identity through the customs and the family names, even if they are forcefully converted to another religion. I would haphazard a hypothesis that in the beginning some tribes of Ugro-Finnish may have settled in the area around Slavs. From the early days Slavic and Scandinavian interaction was intensive and long-lasting. It is not out of place to have a few Nordic tribes moving down to South during the Vikings' period in Russian history. When the Turks came, they named them Bashqor and forcefully converted them to muslim religion, as was their practice during their invasion of Europe. However majority of people in the area were Slavs, and we can see that clearly in the ending of seemingly muslim surnames: Rakhimov, Rasulev, Ismailov, Zairpov for example. The ending of these surnames is unmistakably Slavic. The sufixes "ev" and "ov" mean "of". For example Murtaza Rakhim-OV means Murtaza (son) OF Rakhim. That is something very specific and typical of Slavic surnames. It is typical for Russian, Bulgarian and Slavic Macedonian surnames, and to a lesser extent among southern Croats, especially in the area between Croatia and Bosnia. Coupled with genetic image of the people and we can see very neatly that these cannot possibly be neither Turkish nor Ugro-Finnish people. In fact, the Turkish gene is completely absent and Ugro-Finnish native y-chromosome N is just a tad better at 2.3%. Bashkirs are Slavs with a small percentage of Western Slavs, probably from Finland, hence the confusion about the Ugro-Finnish origins, and/or turkic language. Ugro-Finnish languages too belong to a sub-group of Turkic family of languages (Hungarian much more than Finnish). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 101.117.102.60 (talk) 12:54, 15 September 2014 (UTC)

horseshoes. Bashkirs are not Slavs, their language is turkic without any doubt and turkic is in no way related to Finnish, nor Hungarian. Whatever book you have been reading was a very bad book. --El bes (talk) 23:34, 8 November 2014 (UTC)