Talk:Beignet

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Untitled[edit]

beignet was created by africans but the europeans stole the idea as they did with everything in africa. nigerias also eat the dessert, but reffer to it as puff-puff.

  • Well, if that's true, it's a fascinating story. Got a source? Deltabeignet 05:21, 23 January 2006 (UTC)

Savory sweet?[edit]

"Savory versions of beignets are also popular as an appetizer, with fillings such as maple or fruit preserves." Um, those are still sweet, not savory, aren't they? Abrothman (talk) 02:29, 4 October 2011 (UTC)

Yes, this is exactly why I came to the discussion page; that is a huge error. But I don't know enough to correct it.24.17.196.248 (talk) 12:50, 10 October 2011 (UTC)

US version not choux[edit]

The article currently says, "The French doughnut beignet in the United States is simply a deep-fried choux pastry." But as far as I can tell (try Googling beignet recipe) the US version is an enriched yeast dough. Very different stuff, since choux is unleavened. Vajrapoppy (talk) 03:06, 13 November 2009 (UTC)

Recipe[edit]

The recipe in the article doesn't make sense. It doesn't list any leavening agent, so "letting the dough sit overnight to rise" is pointless. In fact the egg-white foam will quickly collapse. If nobody protests, I will remove the recipe. --Bartosz 19:04, 24 April 2006 (UTC) Good point, blast it awaySnafflekid 05:38, 25 April 2006 (UTC)



Cafe Du Monde[edit]

I would like to point out that Cafe du Monde is not a restaurant. It is a cafe and only serves coffee, milk and beignets. Among most New Orleanians they are not just a place to get a beignet but are considered definitive.

Since the closing of the Morning Call decades ago, Cafe du Monde is the definitive place for coffee and beignets in New Orleans' French Quarter. I see no problem calling it a restaurant, though. A cafe is a type of restaurant with a limited menu. Other restaurants in New Orleans do serve beignets. Cafe du Monde is also a sit-down place. You can order to go, but the vast majority of people I've seen there are seated or waiting for seating. Coffee shop might imply a place with limited seating. Mediasponge (talk) 18:29, 22 June 2011 (UTC)


Cafe DuMonde being "definitive" is an opinion. It also serves orange juice, hot chocolate and soft drinks.

It should also be noted that beignet is actually French for "fritter." The French for "fried dough" is pâte frite. The original recipe was a fried batter. (see The Picayune's Creole Cook Book, originally published in 1901, reprinted and still available.) They were redesigned into the modern doughnut version with the advent of commercial machines. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Mrbentley (talkcontribs) 11:21, 2 August 2011 (UTC)

Puff pastry link[edit]

The link to "puff pastry" should be to "choux pastry" or "cream puff pastry".


I think you're right. You can find choux-pastry recipes for beignets (Julia Child had one). Puff pastry is very different from choux pastry, and it just makes no sense to deep fry it--it would disintegrate! -- Bartosz 19:40, 26 April 2006 (UTC)

Merge[edit]

IMHO merging is a bad idea. Why? All we would end up with is a separate section on this page about Bugnes - they're different enough to warrant separate discussions. Bugnes are small, and a speciality unique to Lyon. Beignets are a general term for donutty things. I don't see a lot of advantage in combining the two on one page. Stevage 08:45, 17 August 2006 (UTC)

In that case, I'll take off the merge tag. --Jitterro 17:30, 17 August 2006 (UTC)

Slang[edit]

Has anyone else ever heard the slang "frogs" used to refer to beignets in some parts of Louisiana? Or maybe "frogs" were the poor man's bengnets since they were made starting by deep frying refrigerated biscuit dough. Just curious if this was something my grandmother just made-up or a colloquial use? And yes, I am quite sure they were not frogs the animal :-) Railgun 13:09, 12 June 2007 (UTC)