Talk:Beryl

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Notice[edit]

Note: For the purposes of retaining the validity of the GDFL and CC licenses under which this article is licensed, the page history of the article Aquamarine, which had been previously merged into this article, is currently located at the subpage Beryl/Aquamarine. Do not remove or archive this notice.

Mines[edit]

We find beryl in our Mica mines located in Tisri & Koderma field in Jharkhand state in India. Please inform us about the end use of Beryl in shapes of Lumps, Flakes and Powders. Is it an industrial mineral being used in metal industry. Plese also inform us about its chemical composition and other merits and demerits. Thanking you, R. Lall, Hindusthan Mica Mart, Main Road, Giridih - 815 301, Jharkhand, India. Phone: 91 6532 222493 / 222223, e-mail: lall01@vsnl.net

Red beryl[edit]

The rare Red Beryl of Utah? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 129.2.40.144 (talk) 13:12, 23 October 2007 (UTC)

Bixbite? What about it? --Ragemanchoo (talk) 07:55, 13 May 2008 (UTC)

Suggested additional etymology details[edit]

The etymology of the greek word is from the name of the town "Vellore" in India, where the gemstone has been mined since antiquity. http://www.new.dli.ernet.in/rawdataupload/upload/insa/INSA_1/20005afa_139.pdf. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 117.193.46.83 (talk) 18:24, 23 November 2009 (UTC)

State gems?[edit]

Is New Hampshire's state mineral beryl, or emerald? Mineral is different from gem. Also, I always thought the state GEM for North Carolina was emerald, since it is found there. --Ragemanchoo (talk) 07:55, 13 May 2008 (UTC)

Merge of Beryl forms[edit]

Golden beryl, Aquamarine, Bixbite, Morganite are already incorporated into Beryl article, and there is no sense keeping them - the structure and physical properties are very similar, as a result, lots of information (links, mineralbox, properties, etc.) is being repeated. Emerald seems large enough to stand on its own. Materialscientist (talk) 09:22, 18 June 2009 (UTC)

Agree with merges including morganite. Vsmith (talk) 12:25, 18 June 2009 (UTC)
Agreed, the varieties are not distinct enough and dont have enough different information to warrent seperate articles.--Kevmin (talk) 16:43, 18 June 2009 (UTC)

Image dispute[edit]

As there has been a bit of a dispute over an image, I've commented it out for now. The image File:National Museum of Natural History Emeralds 2.JPG doesn't appear to be a dark enough green for emerald and the image has been repeatedly shifted between the emerald section and the aquamarine section. Comments from gem savvy editors welcome. Vsmith (talk) 13:52, 22 December 2009 (UTC)

Beryllium oxide toxicity[edit]

Beryllium oxide is toxic, there are no WHMIS designations given for any of the Beryl gemstones. How toxic are they? WHMIS data should be added. (see NFPA_704 )--Adacus12 16:43, 21 April 2010 (UTC)

”very small”[edit]

”The hexagonal crystals of beryl may be very small or range to several meters in size.” What does ”very small” mean here? Nirmos (talk) 06:22, 16 August 2011 (UTC)

Images[edit]

I made a test edit of the article to move images around. While I consider what I made much better than the current mishmash of placements and sizes currently being shown, my changes have problems:

  1. From MOS:IMAGES: "Avoid sandwiching text between two images that face each other, or between an image and an infobox."
    • In order to show aquamarine and emerald at their paragraphs, I did just that.
    • The "Golden beryl and heliodor" paragraph is so small that properly placing the images jams up the following images (although they do not technically "face" each other).
  2. From MOS:IMAGES: "Each image should be inside the major section to which it relates (within the section defined by the most recent level 2 heading), not immediately above the section heading."
    • I placed the images above the "Golden beryl" and used {{clear}} after the section to keep "Goshenite" text from jamming up. Properly placing the images under the header and using {{clear}} left a lot of white space.
  3. From WP:IMGSIZE: "In general, do not define the size of an image unless there is a good reason to do so..." although it goes on about forcing larger sizes rather than smaller.
    • I used 150px and upright tweaking for the images left of the infobox, so as not to squeeze the text still further.
    • I used 100px and upright equivalent for images below the infobox. The paragraphs are too small to support anything larger without zigzagging the images, and thus the text.
  4. {{clear}}
    • I believe a properly formatted article should not need to use this template. I am using it.

Since neither a gallery nor a montage are appropriate, what is left? 71.234.215.133 (talk) 04:15, 29 March 2012 (UTC)

  • Looks good to me. de Bivort 12:17, 29 March 2012 (UTC)

Etymology references[edit]

While they probably used a professional reference, the author did not footnote it in the Sailor Moon encyclopedia article on Queen Beryl.[1] The Online Etymology Dictionary[2] has a bibliography, however it was deemed unreliable at the Reliable Sources noticeboard[3] for also lacking footnotes and not being written by a linguistic scholar. Therefore I have removed/replaced those sources with reliable ones. One I could not fit in was Theodor Benfey's A Sanskrit-English Dictionary because it backs up the vaidûrya = lapis lazuli but without mentioning beryl.[4] 71.234.215.133 (talk) 13:56, 27 January 2014 (UTC)

Etymology of beryl
  1. ^ the oracle:: bssm encyclopaedia. Soul-hunter.com. Retrieved on 2011-04-19.
  2. ^ Beryl, Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved on 2011-04-19.
  3. ^ WP:RSN discussion
  4. ^ Benfey, Theodor (1998) [First published 1888]. A Sanskrit-English Dictionary. Asian Educational Services. p. 906.