Talk:Black Arts Movement

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I think we should delete all the links to random African American art exhibitions. They don't really have anything to do with the Black Arts Movement, or, if they do, their relationship is peripheral and not fundamental to this article? Any objections? ---rwclark

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This article was automatically assessed because at least one WikiProject had rated the article as start, and the rating on other projects was brought up to start class. BetacommandBot 03:49, 10 November 2007 (UTC)

On Malcolm X's assassination "triggering" the Black Arts Movement[edit]

In Confessions From a Former Anti-Semite (Village Voice, 1980), Amiri Baraka talks about forming the Black Arts Repertory Theater School "[l]ate in 1965" (20), which was after Malcolm's assassination in February of that year. He notes a paradigm shift that the assassination triggered in his views towards white people and his realization of the necessity of an art that was actively revolutionary and segregated. In his own words:

Late in 1965, I moved out of the Village and uptown, to 145th Street in Harlem, along with many of my Black comrades. Together we would form the Black Arts Repertory Theater School.

...

[After the Dutchman become popular,] I began to make pronouncements that were suddenly shocking to my old friends, trampling on their subjectivism and liberalism, accusing them of ducking reality, of being tied up with the rulers, of using art to hide from responsibility. But Malcolm's death took me further. Surely this meant that white people, with all the broadness the abstraction conveys, must be responsible, and that our revolution, if it was to be successful, must be aimed at them.

It should be noted that Baraka's most seminal works (Preface..., The Dutchman, The Dead Lecturer) were written before Malcolm X's death, but the founding of BARTS in the same year of that event can certainly seem like triggering. It is possible to see his death as a tangible and defining moment that inspired Baraka to have the Black Arts movement be a more exaggerated break away from white culture, at least in its inception. I am not sure what to change that sentence in need of citation to, because I see why people would say that his death triggered this movement and I also see why people would not consider it a direct cause. Enderandpeter (talk) 02:19, 23 June 2010 (UTC)