Talk:Black rat

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Fancy Black Rats?[edit]

What are the difference between brown and black rat for fancy? Out of better availability, is there some reason to favour brown rats? What are strenght and weaknesses of the black rat compared to the brown rat, when considered as a pet? Reply to David Latapie 18:55, 8 June 2006 (UTC)

- Brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) has been bred for docility mainly for laboratory purposes for thousands of generations and this is where the pet and fancy rats come from. Ship rats on the other hand, have never been selectively bred for handling and are therefore basically wild and untameable, and make terrible pets. Ship rats have several coat colours in the wild, one of which is black, hence the name. In New Zealand, most, in fact, are not black 203.160.125.99 08:46, 22 June 2007 (UTC) John Innes, Landcare Research

Black Rat —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.52.31.65 (talk) 20:57, 14 April 2010 (UTC)


I know this is a kind of a question unlikely to be answered, but wth is that rat eating in the first picture? The whole scene is strikingly ghastly. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.105.113.46 (talk) 23:41, 7 February 2011 (UTC)

  • Ghastly? It's a rat sitting on a carpet next to a table chair, eating what looks like a piece of carrot. (Caption says "black rat at London Zoo", but does the zoo really have a dining room as the rat habitat?) The black rats I see here in Los Angeles are never this black. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.234.224.230 (talk) 07:21, 29 October 2014 (UTC)

Unclear[edit]

"Despite the black rats tendency to displace native species, it can also aid in increasing species population numbers and maintaining species diversity. The bush rat, a common vector for spore dispersal of mycorrhiza commonly known as truffles, has been extirpated from many micro-habitats of Australia. In the absence of a vector for spore dispersal of these truffles, the diversity of truffle species will decline. In a study conducted by Vernes et. al in New South Wales, Australia it was found that although the bush rat consumes a diversity of truffle species, the black rat consumes as much of the diverse fungi as the natives and is an effective vector for spore dispersal. Since the black rat now occupies the many of the micro-habitats that were previously inhabited by the bush rat, the black rat plays an important ecological role in the dispersal of fungal spores. By eradicating the black rat populations in Australia, the diversity of fungi would decline, potentially doing more harm than good."

Looks like OR, and illogical OR at that? Eradicating the BR would return to the status quo, and once the bush rat was re-established the diversity would be unchanged. (I am assuming that the BR displaced the bush rat here.) Rich Farmbrough, 22:12, 25 April 2011 (UTC).

Extinct in Sweden[edit]

The map File:Black rat distribution.png

Black rat distribution.png

is gravely erroneous. It seems to be based on another file of the Brown Rat distribution. Use this file File:Black rat range map.png, instead

Black rat range map.png

(I fixed it!) Rursus dixit. (mbork3!) 16:54, 29 March 2013 (UTC)

Distribution[edit]

It would be useful to include the distribution of the black rat in South America. In Chile the rat was introduced in 1540 and has become widely distributed and abundant according to Simonetti.[1] --DegupediaDE (talk) 08:50, 3 August 2013 (UTC)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Simonetti, Javier A. (1983). "Occurence of the black rat (Rattus rattus) in central Chile" (PDF). Mammalia 47 (1): 131–132. 

Insight[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Aavikko.png

176.24.253.164 (talk) 13:37, 13 January 2014 (UTC)