Talk:Bloodstopping

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Untitled[edit]

this article could probably do with expansion of several other magic practices, like fire drawing, curing the thrush, and so on. Whateley23 03:34, 18 May 2007 (UTC)

This was also a very common practice in northern lumberjack camps, and was written about by Ricard Dawson, Bloodstoppers and Bearwalkers (1952) Dawson collected tales from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. French Canadian Catholics tended to be secretive about the prayer recited, a Finnish man reported he learned a bloodstopping charm from Finland, which was a command for the blood to stop like "the river Jordan when Christ was baptized." Cuvtixo (talk) 02:00, 10 September 2008 (UTC)

From http://www.illinoishistory.com/bloodstopping.html: "Nor is the practice of blood-stopping peculiar to the Ozark country of Illinois, Missouri, and Arkansas. Eliot Wigginton devoted much of the "Faith Healing" chapter in the first Foxfire book to blood-stopping while Margo Holden, in her article "The Bloodstopppers" published in the 1982 edition of The Old Farmer's Almanac, observed that "The use of Bloodstoppers was standard practice all over the North Woods of Maine and Canada." Cuvtixo (talk) 02:00, 10 September 2008 (UTC)