Talk:Bob cut

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Bob as in bob[edit]

Please dear English friends. I sit in Gothenburg and has just started to write on Swedish Wikipedia. I have heard that the word bob in bob cut is from the bob you use to fish small fish in lakes. You know, it could be a cork but usually it is painted red at the top and white at the bottom, sits mid on the fishing line and lays on the water. It is drawn by the fish under the water when that fish bites. My sours tell me that the haircut was named after the look as a fishing bob the guys got when cut there hair like this, Is this right?

 [edit]

I don't mean to trouble the author but I should inform you that this article has been vandalized by User:203.166.96.235. 209.213.71.78 21:05, 18 Feb 2005 (UTC)

Wrong picture[edit]

The photo used to illustrate this article does not show a woman with bobbed hair but, rather, a hairstyle that was popular during the same period, where the hair was pinned up to resemble a bob for women who wanted to look fashionable without cutting their hair.—Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.18.231.55 (talkcontribs)

I'll put in a picture of Louise Brooks instead. Daniel Case 15:42, 2 May 2007 (UTC)
I've removed the inaccurate photo. For anyone who doesn't know what a bob cut looks like: http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=bob+cut&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2. By the way, the text of the article is pretty inaccurate too. Could use a complete re-write. Softlavender (talk) 06:17, 26 June 2008 (UTC)
This article is kind of confusing. There should be a photo of what the bob cut originally looked like and maybe some examples of the so called "variations". Also, why is it even called a bob cut? 207.179.152.149 (talk) 19:16, 26 June 2008 (UTC)
The link on the Louise Brooks picture seems to have broken. I have substituted the photo from the Louise Brooks article even though it doesn't show much of her hair. If anyone finds a better picture, feel free to substitute. –Shoaler (talk) 19:17, 3 September 2008 (UTC)
The picture accompanying the article is a brilliant illustration of how some women kept their hair long but pinned it up to achieve the right "short-hair" head profile. But as someone else pointed out, it's not a bob cut. Can the caption be changed? RLamb (talk) 08:24, 22 November 2009 (UTC)
I honestly don't think that either picture that's added to this article shows a bob cut at all. I see two women wearing hats that hide most of their hair. While they're good to show that some women of a certain era wore their hair short, they don't serve to demonstrate the bob cut. There needs to be pictures of women with their hats off with actual bob cuts. Rubberpuphfx (talk) 11:07, 13 May 2012 (UTC)
Well those two photos illustrate the history section. It's trying to show how women's hair fashion could have evolved from full-length Victorian locks to the bob cut. Obviously for such a radical change to occur, there had to be some intermediary stage. Women like Polaire defied convention and began to chop their hair short way back in the 1890s. She doesn't have what I would think of as a bob cut, but she clearly pioneered short hair for stylish women (and showed it off on her 1910 US tour). She's part of the history of short hairstyles and so of the bob cut.RLamb (talk) 20:20, 13 May 2012 (UTC)

POV[edit]

The part that talks about Rihanna's bob described her song Umbrella as an "international smash hit". While the song certainly was a hit, "international smash hit" is peacock wording and sounds more like an opinion than a fact; perhaps it would be better to just write it as "international hit", without the "smash" part. Also, I don't think too many people are aware that her inspiration for her bob was Aeon Flux, that needs cited with a source. --Crackthewhip775 (talk) 23:27, 28 August 2008 (UTC)

Image copyright problem with File:Louise Brooks in Pandora's Box.jpg[edit]

The image File:Louise Brooks in Pandora's Box.jpg is used in this article under a claim of fair use, but it does not have an adequate explanation for why it meets the requirements for such images when used here. In particular, for each page the image is used on, it must have an explanation linking to that page which explains why it needs to be used on that page. Please check

  • That there is a non-free use rationale on the image's description page for the use in this article.
  • That this article is linked to from the image description page.

This is an automated notice by FairuseBot. For assistance on the image use policy, see Wikipedia:Media copyright questions. --00:19, 6 January 2009 (UTC)

Louise Brooks[edit]

I think the article should give more prominenece to Louise Brooks. Although Coleen Moore was the first film star to be associated with the bob, it was Brooks who give it (as herself) iconic status: see, for example, the biography of her by Barry Paris. LymeRegis (talk) 09:39, 23 October 2009 (UTC)

Pictures[edit]

Both pictures show women wearing hats over the bob cut, and neither clearly depicts the hairstyle AldezD (talk) 20:02, 26 June 2013 (UTC)

Origin of the word 'bob'[edit]

Please add text and references regarding the origin of the word or term 'bob'/'bobbed' cut. Was it invented by a hairdresser named Bob, or from where did it origin? -- Katana (talk) 16:48, 1 August 2013 (UTC)