Talk:Bolesław Bierut

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Bierut didn't allow show trials?[edit]

During his time in office hundreds Polish military officers and soldiers (most of whom had fought against the Nazi's in WW2 on all fronts) were executed after secret trials for being allegedly "western spies". Thousands more were imprisoned. That is the stark reality of Bierut's stalinist policies. Sure, they weren't the show trials, but don't suggest it was hunky dory in Bierut's Poland...

Pkmink, 9 april 2004

A "show trial" is a trial held in public, like the Moscow Trials, the Rudolf Slansky trial in Czechoslovakia or the Laszlo Rajk trial in Hungary. There were no show trials in Poland. A secret trial is by definition not a show trial. Research should precede indignation. Adam 12:12, 9 Apr 2004 (UTC)

Where in the article is it suggested that it was hunky dory in Bierut's Poland? Adam 12:13, 9 Apr 2004 (UTC)

Well, I think you haven't said enough about the repressive policies of Bierut (except the expulsion of the Germans and a general remark about stalinist policies). I think an additional remark about Bierut clamping down on anti-communist resistance should be included. Pkmink 13:07, 9 Apr 2004 (UTC)

That's a much more sensible comment. Why don't you write a paragraph to that effect? Adam 13:18, 9 Apr 2004 (UTC)

ok, I will. btw, sorry for my overreacting.Pkmink 13:39, 9 Apr 2004 (UTC)

Overreacting appears to be a Polish national characteristic. We are used to it. Adam 14:08, 9 Apr 2004 (UTC)

The world would be more boring without it... :-)Pkmink 14:11, 9 Apr 2004 (UTC)

I've added some lines about trials of Bierut's opponents, some of them were in fact show trials, later I will elaborate more on Gen. Tatar's trials and the WiN trials. There were also some high profile secret trials (which became public much later). I will add pages for those as well. Pkmink 16:09, 9 Apr 2004 (UTC)

Bierut is mentioned as an NKVD investigator during 1930's purges[edit]

Bierut is mentioned as an NKVD investigator during 1930's purges by defector turned author Alexander Orlov, in his book "Secret History of Stalin's Crimes," p. 102. This less-than-laudable part of his career doesn't seem to be widely known or mentioned (if in fact it's true). In fact, I checked here for supporting evidence.

According to Orlov, Beirut worked under the name of Boleslav Rutkovsky. He was in charge of the case of one Zorokh Friedmann. He tricked Friedmann into pleading guilty to a minor crime in 1935 and the poor guy got 10 years in Solovki.

Friedmann was later re-arrested from camp for use in the show trials; but because of his rage at having been tricked the first time he held up to the persuasion of the NKVD.

I don't know how to verify this or add it to the article, but I thought I'd mention it.

Soviet puppet[edit]

Can someone be so simply characterized as a soviet puppet? What would yo say if nearly all American presidents were named as US puppets?

- Maybe not american presidents, but '60s and '70s south american dictators certainly were. 216.221.32.116 (talk) 20:48, 30 September 2009 (UTC) L.D.

Trial of the Sixteen[edit]

The trial was organized by the Soviets in Moscow. Xx236 13:45, 1 June 2006 (UTC)

People's Republic of Poland[edit]

The article says that "from 1947 to 1952, he was President of the People's Republic of Poland." However, the People's Republic of Poland was formed in 1952. - A.T.

Jewish?[edit]

Bierut was not a Jew.--Alexvonf 13:17, 1 September 2006 (UTC)

Killed himself?[edit]

I remember my late father telling me that Bierut committed suicide, could you confirm or deny that? --Vladko 03:51, 17 September 2006 (UTC)

- The article on Nikita Khruchtchev says Bierut died of a heart attack while reading the Secret Report. 216.221.32.116 (talk) 20:50, 30 September 2009 (UTC) L.D.