Talk:Bovril

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Food and drink (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Food and drink, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of food and drink related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
 
WikiProject Brands (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Brands, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Brands on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject United Kingdom (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject United Kingdom, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the United Kingdom on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Business (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Business, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of business articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Companies (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Companies, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of companies on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Untitled[edit]

OK, I just tried the new Bovril (my wife bought it by accident) and it's horrible. They've added a load of salt and it seems gritty and tasteless by comparison. The old beef pots are likely to start selling on eBay now :-) -- redbaron

Bovril: "The Demon Drink".
It's probably as a direct result of opening that first tin that the French started eating frogs and snails and horses. ... Somewhere on the outskirts of Paris there's a landfill with 999,999 tins of 100 year old Bovril buried in it just waiting for some unsuspecting Frenchie to come wandering by with a metal detector ...
OK, you're not the first one who complained. He did it before they switched to the yeast formula! I think I am going to buy some leftover beef jars for myself. -- Toytoy 05:17, Dec 7, 2004 (UTC)

Aaggh[edit]

Didn't know about this changeover to yeast before. What is the point, that is what Marmite is for! Bovril tastes of beef, that is surely the point of it! Oh well I'm sure Tesco will still sell 'Beefy' paste... pomegranate 11:53, Feb 14, 2005 (UTC)

  • Yes, Tesco and other UK supermarkets still sell own-brand 'Beefy' pastes using beef extract. Looking at the labels, they all seem to have the same ingredients and proportions, so I wonder who makes them. Does anyone know if it is, in fact, Unilever? -- Picapica 10:53, 28 March 2006 (UTC)
  • I would imagine that, like many other food stuffs, such as beers and cereal, the company manufacturing the goods will sell the "cast off" products for supermarkets to use as their own brand, by which I mean those which fall outside of the stringent quality control tests for the official product, but as a "supermarkets own", it is fine. I know that unsuitable Fosters is often sold to ASDA. - Solo.card 07:13, January 11, 2007

i want to know the ingredient are 'halal' for muslims? i want to try to my child. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Zaidatul (talkcontribs) 02:29, 5 November 2007 (UTC)

Vril[edit]

The vril component of the name comes from Bulwer-Lytton's once-popular 19th century "lost race" novel, The Coming Race,

Is that true?
Unilever state this on their Bovril webpage. It be intersting to know what source they use. ant_ie 22:51, 2 October 2005 (UTC)

bovril... in a nutshell[edit]

its amazing this stuff! it saved my life, i used to be into sex drugs and rock and roll, until i tried some of this, it gave me such a kick, i am now seeking help and a recovering alcoholic. i just love bovril it is the best beef exstract spread that mixed with hot water makes the best savory drink ive ever had!! i like it more than beer.

Marmite[edit]

I edited the article to say it tastes similar to its cousin, Marmite. Hope nobody minds. 81.86.76.6 06:07, 25 September 2006 (UTC)

Beef version availability[edit]

Can anyone confirm or deny if the beef version is once again available in the US? DarkAudit 03:25, 18 October 2006 (UTC)

The Yeast they could do

I can deny it. All I can find is yeast-based Borvil.

My DH talked to the proprieter of a British foods import shop, who said that the government still banned imports of British beef products, including Bovril. So at this time, only the vegetarian version is available here. She also thought that was also true in Canada, but she wasn't sure.--H-ko (Talk) 16:59, 6 April 2008 (UTC)
I recently checked a local store that sells Bovril and they only have the yeast extract version.--MythicFox (talk) 23:28, 26 August 2008 (UTC)

Overusing the adjective Savoury[edit]

why do you limeys have to use the word 'savoury'( note spelling ) in every description of snack foods sold in the UK? it shows a lack of creativity and an inability to spell( its spelled 'savory' dont cha know ). too much marmite i think.

-Savoury is used once on the Bovril page, and it accurately describes Bovril, it being a salty rather than a sweet foodstuff. And I think, if you check, you'll find they were speaking English in Britain long before anyone was mispelling "savoury" and "don't you" in America.

No wonder we left! *grin*

Savoury is the English spelling. I've no idea why Americans insist on altering the spelling of perfectly good words. But then again, you think it's a good idea for every hillbilly to be able to buy a gun at four days notice... Smurfmeister (talk) 11:08, 5 March 2010 (UTC)

Illegality of Thermos Flasks[edit]

Surely that's not true? Is there a citation we can use? Unless it's from alcohol and stuff Ultre (talk) 14:40, 21 November 2007 (UTC)

See http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts1995/ukpga_19950039_en_3#pt2-l1g20
It stems (mostly) from the Scottish Cup final in 1980 which ended in a riot attributed primarily to alcohol consumption. It is now against the law to enter a football ground in Scotland with a "controlled container" defined in the Law as:
…any bottle, can or other portable container, whether open or sealed, which is, or was, in its original manufactured state, capable of containing liquid and is made from such material or is of such construction, or is so adapted, that if it were thrown at or propelled against a person it would be capable of causing some injury to that person; but the term does not include a container holding a medicinal product for a medicinal purpose. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Grievous Angel (talkcontribs) 17:39, 21 November 2007 (UTC)

Hula Hoops and Cream Crackers[edit]

I've removed the following from the product range:

  • Bovril hula hoops (25g)
  • Bovril chicken flavored Cream crackers (95g)

for two reasons, there's no reference to back up that they exist, and, in any case, they wouldn't be Bovril products made by the same manufacturer (Unilever). Hula Hoops are a brand of potato crisp snack (KP I think) and I can find no mention of a Bovril flavour on any Hula Hoops site. Jacob (the best-known cracker manufacturer) don't do a Bovril chicken flavour that I can find a source for either. If Hula Hoops do have a Bovril range and there is a Bovril-flavour cracker then they should be mentioned somewhere in the main text as they are certainly not part of the Bovril product range. Something like this may be appropriate: "The Bovril flavour is so popular that it has been incorporated into other food products such as potato crisp snacks and cracker-type biscuits." Grievous Angel (talk) 06:30, 27 May 2008 (UTC)

There certainly used to be (and may still be - I live in the U.S. now) Bovril flavoured Crisps (potato chips to you Americans) available in the U.K. They may not have been made by the Bovril company but presumably the name was licensed from them. Treharne (talk) 01:31, 23 January 2009 (UTC)

Recall[edit]

I'm not sure were it would fit, but perhaps some reference to the salmonela recall is in order. [1] 66.191.19.217 (talk) 18:37, 31 August 2008 (UTC)

Bovril was always largely yeast[edit]

I have a jar of beef Bovril in front of me, bought in England in 2006, and the first two ingredients listed are Beef Extract (43%), and Yeast Extract (24%). As a long time Bovril enthusiast, I know that it also had a large proportion of yeast even before the changeover to the vegetarian version. In fact I rather think that the proportion of yeast was higher back then (but I cannot prove this). In any case, to speak of yeast as opposed to beef Bovril is misleading, as all types contain a lot of yeast extract. As I recall, a significant ingredient of the vegetarian Bovril is celery extract. Personally, I found the vegetarian version acceptable. I never did a side-by-side taste test, but it certainly tasted remarkably similar to the traditional Bovril, and quite different from Marmite or Vegemite. Treharne (talk) 01:31, 23 January 2009 (UTC)

History makes no sense[edit]

The last sentence of the first paragraph of the history makes no sense to me: "Unfortunately, Britain did not have a large enough quantity of beef to meet the French people's and Napoleon III's demand, so Johnston created a product known as 'Johnston's Fluid Beef' -- later called Bovril." Why would not having enough beef to meet demand lead to the creation of a product made from beef? The label on the Bovril jar in front of me says, "In 1871, a Scot, won a 'canned beef' contract to FEED Napoleon's troops with his INVENTION "Johnston's Fluid Beef". This has evolved into the BOVRIL we know today." (Capitalization and inconsistent use of quote marks as in original.) This implies that the original contract was for " Fluid Beef," which must, therefore, already have been invented (although the failure to note that this must have been Napoleon III rather than the Napoleon throws some doubt on its reliability).

Also, no sources are cited for the History section. Is it from the Bovril web site? Treharne (talk) 01:47, 23 January 2009 (UTC)

Because Bovril is less than 50% beef (about 20% yeast). It stretches the meat. A similar concept to (American) meatloaf: "During the Great Depression, cooking meatloaf was a way to stretch the food budget for families, using an inexpensive type of meat and other ingredients as leftovers; along with spices, it was popular to add cereal grains to the meatloaf to stretch the meat." Air (talk) 03:49, 1 September 2012 (UTC)

Bovril with milk[edit]

After an earlier claim was deleted, I had placed a clear, cited notation that Bovril can be mixed with milk. The citation, from a reliable published book on food history, clearly shows that this has been done. One could also say "can be mixed with water or (less commonly) milk." In my work on Bovril in the 1930's, I found numerous trade adverts recommending such a mixture (these are harder to cite, simply because copyright restrictions make them impossible to reproduce here on Wikipedia). Nevertheless, another editor has seen fit to delete this reference as well, claiming that such mixture was not common, but I don't think that is the point -- it is simply that this is one known preparation. It is well-documented.

Claims with cited reliable sources should not be removed without discussion, that is my understanding. Unless someone wishes to argue that Bovril cannot or is not mixed with milk -- which is clearly not the case -- I do not see why this very modest statement ought not to be in the entry. Can we reach a consensus here?? Clevelander96 (talk) 21:59, 13 October 2009 (UTC)

Far from a reliable source..this one snippet does little to suggest that making bovril with milk is common practice. Seems to be more of an historial footnote that may possibly be worth mentioning somewhere further down the article, if a better, more descriptive, source can be found, but it certainly has no place in the opening section. magnius (talk) 22:07, 13 October 2009 (UTC)
There is ample and extensive evidence of such a practice -- I simply chose the most authoritative and current one-- Richard Tames, Feeding London: a Taste of History, p. 92. London: Historical Publications, 2003 ISBN 0948667850 [2]. This is a standard historical text on British food.
But there is ample additional evidence: A brief search through newspapers, magazines, or Google Books shows dozens of references to such a mixture. An Oxford medical publication of 1908 describes it [3]; it's mentioned in Great Britain, Parliamentary Papers [4], and also described in a biography of Dorothy Sayers as something she took at bed after finishing a novel [5]. There is even a current Facebook discussion about such a practice [6]. Such references make it clear the practice has long been known, and still exists. Clevelander96 (talk) 22:13, 13 October 2009 (UTC)
Here [7] is another link showing a typical 1930's trade advert: "A spoonful of Bovril, stirred into a glass of milk -- hot or cold --makes a delicious beverage." Similar adverts ran in the Illustrated London News at the time, and in other UK and commonwealth papers. Clevelander96 (talk) 22:20, 13 October 2009 (UTC)
Hearing no objections, I have placed a nuanced, sourced statement "or (less commonly) with milk" in the entry. It seems to me it belongs where it is, as this section describes the different manners in which Bovril may be prepared. Clevelander96 (talk) 15:35, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

Date of Pope Poster[edit]

I think we can narrow the date of the "Two Infallible Powers" poster from 'early 20th century' to pre-1903. The pope depicted is recognisably Leo XIII (died 1903); the nose, in particular is quite distinctive. ANB (talk) 14:03, 4 November 2009 (UTC)

name[edit]

its called bovril because its bovine, am i right? NorthFarWest (talk) 23:59, 14 August 2011 (UTC)

  • yes sort of. Bos (cow) and a magnet substance in a fictional universe called Vril. JJhashisreasons (talk) 23:42, 11 August 2012 (UTC)