Talk:Bowhead whale

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blue whale[edit]

blue whale

Hi, welcome to Wikipedia. To read and/or edit an article about the Blue Whale, click here : Blue Whale. Pete/Pcb21 (talk) 13:44, 4 Feb 2004 (UTC)

New article about a bowhead ... OLD bowhead...[edit]

here. Tomertalk 22:13, 12 June 2007 (UTC)

The BBC also carries this topic now:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/6751175.stm

Here's another one. Curiously it says "Experts have pinned down the weapons manufacture to a New England factory in about 1880 and say it was rendered obsolete by a less bulky darting gun a few years later", somewhat contradictory to the 1890 dating in the article. --Anshelm '77 22:49, 25 September 2007 (UTC)

Similarities[edit]

The text from this article:

In May of 2007, a 50-ton specimen caught and harvested off the Alaskan coast was discovered to have the head of an explosive harpoon embedded deep under the blubber of its neck. Examination determined the 3 1/2-inch arrow-shaped projectile was manufactured in New Bedford, Massachusetts, a major whaling center, around 1890. This proof that it survived a similar hunt more than a century ago indicated to researchers that the whale's age was between 115 and 130 years old.

The text on Slashdot:[1]

LABarr writes "AP and CNN are carrying a story that has forced scientists to re-evaluate the longevity of mammals. A bowhead whale caught off the Alaskan coast last month had a weapon fragment embedded in its neck that showed it survived a similar hunt over a century ago. 'Embedded deep under its blubber was a 3½-inch arrow-shaped projectile that has given researchers insight into the whale's age, estimated between 115 and 130 years old. The bomb lance fragment, lodged in a bone between the whale's neck and shoulder blade, was likely manufactured in New Bedford, on the southeast coast of Massachusetts, a major whaling center at that time. It was probably shot at the whale from a heavy shoulder gun around 1890.' "

They're not the same text, but it's pretty clear that either they had a common ancestor, or one was directly based on the phrases from the other. -Harmil 20:40, 15 June 2007 (UTC)

It's most likely this is because they were both derived from a news agency report.. EasyTarget (talk) 09:44, 11 June 2008 (UTC)

conservation status confusing[edit]

of the populations listed in the Population Status section of the article only one is "conservation dependent" with all other populations in worse shape. Why is the conservation status in the infobox then listed as conservation dependent instead of vulnerable or endangered?--Ibis3 19:02, 6 August 2007 (UTC)

Six years later I have the same question. Unfortunately the source link is broken. I'm going to change the "least concern" to "vulnerable" so that the article is consistent in and of itself. However, someone needs to find a new source because these could all be inaccurate. --Trakon (talk) 22:06, 27 July 2013 (UTC)
Belaying the change regarding my last comment. The source link is broken for those listed Conservation section. But the Redlist source is current for "least concern" status. --Trakon (talk) 22:15, 27 July 2013 (UTC)

Ski?[edit]

Is it possible to ski behind one of these monsters? I mean, can they be trained like the dolphins at Sea World? Seems like it would be a "greener" way to ski than running a high-powered motorboat. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.92.23.29 (talk) 19:51, 10 July 2009 (UTC)

Everybody knows that one can only ski on slopes. But there's no steep lakes or seas on Earth. Thus waterskiing is a physical absurdity. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.193.101.216 (talk) 21:01, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

The large tail fin would cause a great deal of choppy water behind them. Plus, it's a slow swimmer and for water skiing you need a reasonably fast and steady tug forward, or you'll sink. Strausszek (talk) 02:18, 21 May 2011 (UTC)

WP:CETA capitalisation discussion[edit]

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: Move Pages  Ronhjones  (Talk) 23:14, 15 February 2010 (UTC)



Bowhead WhaleBowhead whale — See Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Cetaceans#Capitalisation. Swift (talk) 01:28, 2 February 2010 (UTC)

Also:

"a thorough examination of relevent academic discussions specifically about capitalisation would be a start." Please see the discussion at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Cetaceans#Capitalisation.
"that my first check of the literature finds contrary," I encourage you to read the discussion in its entirety. We've spent quite a bit of time on this.
"my objection at WP:CETA was moved and hidden" Your objection was indeed moved (with a descriptive edit summary) from the Rationale section down to the Comments section but in no way hidden and I resent the accusation.
"There has been no response to the issues raised." The issue had already been raised and resolved nearly seven weeks before you posted your comment. I'm sorry, but if you cannot be bothered to read the discussion through, you cannot demand others spend their time answering every little problem you have.
"major change to existing practice" Existing practice on Wikipedia is irrelevant. This project does not set standards.
"...prior to resolution" We've spent a good deal of time over the last couple of months getting to the bottom of existing practice in relevant literature. Having reached the conclusion that the literature overwhelmingly uses sentence case, we cast a wide net (I personally tagged every single cetacean species talk page) to get comments from the community should they have any arguments that we had missed. None came up so we made a test case on a prominent page and are now going through official channels rather than having the administrators active on WP:CETA move them. If you're insinuating that we're somehow bypassing the community on this, I suggest you take the time to read the discussion at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Cetaceans#Capitalisation. --Swift (talk) 15:28, 8 February 2010 (UTC)
Per this response, I reassert opposition. I have read the WP:CETA discussion. My concern was not addressed anywhere - precisely why I made a comment. My comment is still not addressed. And now I have no idea where the appropriate venue is for discussion - is it here, or at WP:CETA, or was it at Killer Whale and now a fait accompli? And this project most certainly sets standards for this project. Gimmetrow 15:54, 8 February 2010 (UTC)
It is true that the cetacean section of MSW 3 mostly uses title case (also note the account of Indopacetus pacificus); as I had already said, Swift's earlier comment was incorrect. (Incidentally, there are a few places in other chapters of MSW 3 where sentence case is used, as Aranae noted somewhere.) However, we shouldn't be relying solely on one source, and I think the WT:CETA discussion has made it clear that the rest of the literature mostly uses sentence case, at least in prose. Ucucha 15:59, 8 February 2010 (UTC)
  • Strong oppose "North Pacific right whale"? "Southern right whale"? "Bryde's whale"? "Antarctic minke whale"? ??? What the hell? Since when is the Right not capitalized?? And "Bryde's" etc all the other possessive forms require that it be capitalized. Or do you call it "Bryde's" as a bare possessive??? 70.29.210.242 (talk) 05:18, 4 February 2010 (UTC)
    • See [2]: most of the scientific community appears to disagree with you about the capitalization of "right". Same for Antarctic minke whale and Bryde's whale. I am not sure where your assertion that possessive forms require capitalization comes from; it is evidently not a view shared by many reliable sources. Ucucha 05:40, 4 February 2010 (UTC)
    • Your input would be welcome at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Cetaceans#Capitalisation. Please read what has been written and feel free to add to the discussion if you think that we are making a mistake. I think that a lot of time has appropriately been spent making sure that we're getting it right, and if we're making a mistake, please speak up and point us in the right direction. Neil916 (Talk) 07:12, 4 February 2010 (UTC)
      • Additional comment/clarification request. Sorry, what is a "bare possessive"? It's been many, many moons since I've taken any kind of English grammar classes, so please forgive my ignorance. If I try to read into the context of your statement, I believe that the convention is for the "B" in Bryde's whale to be in title case, regardless of its location in a sentence, since it was named after Johan Bryde, who helped set up the first whaling station in Durban, South Africa in 1908. On the other hand, the right whale, supposedly named because it was the "right" whale to hunt because it floated to the surface when it died (rather than sinking to the ocean bottom) would not be capitalized unless it happened to be the first word of a sentence. Am I understanding your question/opposition correctly? Neil916 (Talk) 07:29, 4 February 2010 (UTC)
  • Comment I don't have a dog in this hunt (as they say) but in the past I have heard from a couple of people working among the San Juan Islands/Gulf Islands that in the case of Killer Whale, the "K" and "W" were capitalized because an orca is actually a dolphin, not a whale, and using capitals reflect that its a proper name consisting of the two words together. Other examples include American Buffalo (which really isn't a buffalo) I tried to do an internet search to justify this imprssion but was unsuccessful, and I don't really care which way this move request goes, but obviously I cared enough to mention this possible explanation for the use of capitals. 67.100.222.77 (talk) 03:36, 12 February 2010 (UTC)
    "Killer whale" (with either capitalization) is certainly not a proper name. A proper name is a word referring to a specific unique thing, instead of a type or class of things. Keiko is a unique killer whale, so "Keiko" is a proper name, but "killer whale" is still a common name since it describes a type of animal, not a specific animal. Jafeluv (talk) 13:54, 13 February 2010 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

conservation status of LC conflicts with the threat status detailed in the article[edit]

conservation status of LC in the header conflicts with the threat status detailed in the article

CITES only blindly follows the IWC and lists all whales that have been hunted. Stupid, really. SHFW70 (talk) 20:02, 28 July 2013 (UTC)

Split genus and species articles[edit]

The genus and the species articles will need to be split at some point. While it is correct to say the genus is monotypic, it is only correct in relation to extant species. The text already contradicts the monotypic assertion of the lead and taxonomic section with the mention of Balaena prisca. however there are at least 10 more extinct species known and listed in the Paleobiology Database: Balaena affinis, Balaena arcuata, Balaena dubusi, Balaena forsythmajori, Balaena larteti, Balaena macrocephalus, Balaena montalionis, Balaena pampaea, Balaena ricei, and Balaena simpsoni. --Kevmin § 07:37, 21 December 2010 (UTC)

Balaena is now un-redirected -fossil material can be added again. Casliber (talk · contribs) 08:30, 21 December 2010 (UTC)
Thanks, I have expanded and modernized the article a little and it should hopefully get more information as the articles are created. --Kevmin § 09:23, 21 December 2010 (UTC)

Worth mentioning[edit]

See here. --194.144.212.210 (talk) 13:05, 23 February 2012 (UTC)

bowhead[edit]

Lives among the arctic pack ice,. hunting by ESkimos. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.224.32.157 (talk) 21:54, 23 June 2013 (UTC)

Bowhead is 3rd largest whale[edit]

The fin whale is the second largest whale. According to Lockyer's formula, the average weight of an 85 foot fin whale would be 100.4 tonnes, or 110.7 tons. This is the average weight throughout all seasons. In his other paper, "growth and energy budgets of large baleen whales from the southern hemisphere," he calculates that blue and fin whales gain half of their body weight during the feeding months. (a blue whale entering the antarctic weighing 100 tons would leave weighing 150 tons) The average weight would be 5/6 of the "fattened" weight. Therefore an 85 foot fin whale would weigh 132.8 tons at the end of the feeding season, larger than any right or bowhead whale.MrAwesome888 (talk) 20:59, 5 August 2014 (UTC)