Talk:Brian Hutton, Baron Hutton

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Untitled[edit]

Wikipedia naming conventions suggest that pages peers for life be situated at the name of the peer, and not the name of the peerage. -- Lord Emsworth 04:16, Jan 4, 2004 (UTC)


This article says he retired on Jan 11. The article on the Hutton Inquiry says he retired when the report was released. Which is correct? Adam 23:54, 1 Feb 2004 (UTC)

I replied at Talk:Hutton Inquiry. Pete/Pcb21 (talk) 08:24, 2 Feb 2004 (UTC)

Why is this article called James Brian Edward Hutton? His working name is Brian Hutton. Since there do not appear to be any other Brian Huttons in the world, why do we put his full name in the title? If no-one has a good answer I will propose moving the article. Adam 04:12, 3 Feb 2004 (UTC)


There is some confusion as to wether Hutton was involved in the Bloody Sunday inquest or the Bloody Sunday inquiry (Widgery Tribunal). See for example Nick Cohen in the Observer, or these. From this BBC article it seems quite clear though at it was the inquest. Can anyone confirm this? User:pir 06:00, 3 Feb 2004


In a pre-emptive strike against probably criticism of quoting a Sinn Fein guy, let me point out that Peter Oborne is at least as biased as Danny Morrison, who should, I believe, be quoted here to preserve overall NPOV. New Statesman: "Peter Oborne,[...] is an ultraloyal supporter of Crown and Army, and son of Brigadier Oborne, secretary of the Anglo-Irish Parliamentary Body (but not, fascinatingly, in Who's Who). Unusually for Westminster hacks, who chiefly mix with politicians, Oborne is well-connected in the establishment demi-monde." User:pir 05:52, 3 Feb 2004

I added the Oborne extract, and I have no objection to the balancing quote from the Sinn Fein guy. The Spectator is of course a Tory paper, so Oborne's bias should be apparent to all. I cited it to balance the rather anti-Hutton tone of the preceding commentary. Adam 02:21, 4 Feb 2004 (UTC)


The number of names this article has been at seems at bit startling. It seems to move on about a weekly basis... don't we have a fixed policy for Barons and other nobles? Pcb21| Pete 11:04, 31 Jul 2004 (UTC)

"The Widgery Tribunal, a commission of inquiry established by the Heath government, is now widely regarded as a whitewash of the British Army." I think this has to come under the heading of weasel words. It is also rather nonsencical, "a whitewash [of] the British army". Is this supposed to mean a whitewash, organised by the British army, or exonerating the British army? Can anyone in the know improve on this? Thehalfone 15:52, 25 February 2007 (UTC)


Why is this information missing?

A history of Hutton's life, from Bloody Sunday cover up to Pinochet affair to Iraq war. Upon his resignation as BBC chairman Gavyn Davies commented on the irreconcilable contradictions between Hutton's "bald conclusions" and the balance of evidence presented to the actual Inquiry. Even BBC political editor Andrew Marr comments on Huttons underlying assumptions and background, making him more likely to believe and trust certain social groups: "again and again, he comes down on the side of politicians and officials." So who is Hutton, and what is in his background to come to these extraordinary conclusions? What has lead to the reports extraordinary absolution of Blair and attack on journalistic freedom? The 72 year old Baron Hutton of Bresagh, County of Down, North Ireland, is of the British ruling establishment. A member of the Anglo-Irish elite, he was educated at Shewsbury all boys boarding school, and then Balliol, Oxford, before entering the exclusive club of the British Judiciary. Whilst British Judges are overwhelmingly conservative, upper class, white, Hutton's background is even more compromised. His name will be familiar to residents of the Six counties of Ulster. During the bloody thrity years war Hutton was an instrument of British state repression, starting in the late 1960's as junior counsel to the Northern Ireland attorney general, and by 1988 rising to the top job of Lord Chief Justice of Northern Ireland. Hutton spent his career as Judge and Jury in the notorious northern Ireland kangaroo 'Diplock Courts'. These were special non-Jury courts, condemned by human rights advocates for their miscarriages of justice. He was hated for this role by the families of the many innocent catholics wrongly convicted here. Hutton distinguished himself after the Bloody Sunday massacre of civil rights protesters in 1972. He played a key role in the ensuing judicial cover-up called the Widgery Inquiry which absolved British troops of Murder. This miscarriage of justice is only now being investigated by the current Saville inquiry. Then in 1978 he represnted the British Government before the European Court of Human Rights, defending it against a ruling that it abused and maltreated detainees from the conflict. However, he will be remembered in the rest of the UK for his role in the 1999 Pinochet affair. Another senior Judge, Lord Hoffman had contributed to the decision to arrest and extradite the notorious former dicator of Chile and mass murderer General Pinochet during his visit to Britain. As a law lord, Hutton led the rightwing attack on Lord Hoffman, on the excuse that Hoffman's links to the human rights group amnesty international invalidated Pinochets arrest! Lord Hutton said "public confidence in the integrity of the administration of justice would be shaken" if Lord Hoffman's ruling was not overturned. More recently, Hutton was also involved in the ruling that David Shayler, the former MI5 agent, could not argue he was acting in the public interest by revealing secrets. This history of intimate links with, and knowledge of Britains secret military intelligence operations meant he could be a trusted pair of hands when it came to the Kelly affair — Preceding unsigned comment added by 57.66.91.4 (talk) 06:38, 7 October 2011 (UTC)

BLP clean up[edit]

This article need more inline citations. It is poorly referenced under the conditions for a BLP. Correct referencing may help reduce the number of questions of the type preceding this message.--Kudpung (talk) 04:30, 19 March 2010 (UTC)

Controversy[edit]

A history of Hutton's life, from Bloody Sunday cover up to Pinochet affair to Iraq war. Upon his resignation as BBC chairman Gavyn Davies commented on the irreconcilable contradictions between Hutton's "bald conclusions" and the balance of evidence presented to the actual Inquiry. Even BBC political editor Andrew Marr comments on Huttons underlying assumptions and background, making him more likely to believe and trust certain social groups: "again and again, he comes down on the side of politicians and officials." His name will be familiar to residents of the Six counties of Ulster. During the bloody thrity years war Hutton was an instrument of British state repression, starting in the late 1960's as junior counsel to the Northern Ireland attorney general, and by 1988 rising to the top job of Lord Chief Justice of Northern Ireland. Hutton spent his career as Judge and Jury in the notorious northern Ireland kangaroo 'Diplock Courts'. These were special non-Jury courts, condemned by human rights advocates for their miscarriages of justice. He was hated for this role by the families of the many innocent catholics wrongly convicted here. Hutton distinguished himself after the Bloody Sunday massacre of civil rights protesters in 1972. He played a key role in the ensuing judicial cover-up called the Widgery Inquiry which absolved British troops of Murder. This miscarriage of justice is only now being investigated by the current Saville inquiry. Then in 1978 he represnted the British Government before the European Court of Human Rights, defending it against a ruling that it abused and maltreated detainees from the conflict. However, he will be remembered in the rest of the UK for his role in the 1999 Pinochet affair. Another senior Judge, Lord Hoffman had contributed to the decision to arrest and extradite the notorious former dicator of Chile and mass murderer General Pinochet during his visit to Britain. As a law lord, Hutton led the rightwing attack on Lord Hoffman, on the excuse that Hoffman's links to the human rights group amnesty international invalidated Pinochets arrest! Lord Hutton said "public confidence in the integrity of the administration of justice would be shaken" if Lord Hoffman's ruling was not overturned. More recently, Hutton was also involved in the ruling that David Shayler, the former MI5 agent, could not argue he was acting in the public interest by revealing secrets. This history of intimate links with, and knowledge of Britains secret military intelligence operations meant he could be a trusted pair of hands when it came to the Kelly affair — Preceding unsigned comment added by 57.66.91.4 (talk) 06:40, 7 October 2011 (UTC)