Talk:Brick and mortar

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Brick(s) and mortar is more than just a business term.[edit]

Brick(s) and mortar is more than a business term. As I have written in the summary, it can simply refer to a physical presence, without any connection to business. Following that, more specifically, the term then has a wider usage to delineate a difference between an online business and physical one. Hence the main term to be used is brick and mortar (I have picked at random the US variant, and linked the more common UK bricks and mortar accordingly — math vs maths!). --Jimthing (talk) 00:09, 5 September 2011 (UTC)

Not the same as "High Street" shops[edit]

I think the comparison to High Street shops is wrong. The US equivalent of High Street is Main Street. It refers to the same idea; small retailers usually located in a town, in contrast with larger "big-box" stores often located in suburban shopping centers/centres. I'm going to remove that paragraph based on my understanding of the terms. Paulc206 (talk) 07:12, 3 November 2011 (UTC)

Retronym discussion[edit]

I added a bit to this due to the fact that there were "order by mail" businesses that had no storefronts or "physical presence" for decades before there was an Internet. Sears Roebuck, for example, had only a limited, customer-accessible brick and mortar presence when its catalog business was at its height; unless you lived in Chicago it was not a brick and mortar entity - you ordered everything from them via catalog. 68.146.80.110 (talk) 19:08, 26 November 2011 (UTC)