Talk:Brilliant Blue FCF

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Untitled[edit]

Please reword: "It has the capacity for inducing an allergic reaction in individuals with pre-existing moderate asthma." The statement is misleading since the citation (Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Volume 64, Issue 1, July 1979) found dyes to be an uncommon cause of significant reactions. The abstract states "Our findings confirm that ASA intolerance is relatively common but suggest on the other hand that reactions to dyes and preservatives are an uncommon cause of clinically significant bronchoconstriction in moderately severe perennial asthmatics." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.195.212.68 (talk) 18:56, 1 August 2011 (UTC)

I've removed: In some circumstances, Brilliant Blue FCF has been linked to death. This sentence needs to be expanded if it's to be included. --jpgordon∇∆∇∆ 15:24, 21 September 2005 (UTC)

Its banned in a few more countries, but don't know how too add them without messing up the whole page... Poland, Portugal, Trinidad, Turkey, Argentina, Mauritius, Czech Republic, Hungary, Morrocco... http://www.laleva.cc/food/enumbers/E131-E140.html is the source of my data...

'The dye is poorly absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract and 95% of the absorbed dye can be found in the urine.'
It is either one or the other.
Checked it out on toxnet, it is excretion route is almost exclusively faecal. I will try and update it myself, but if it doesn't work, this note is here for the next person --Quality Alison 06:48, 1 May 2007 (UTC)Quality Asin

Any specific examples of foods that include this dye?[edit]

I noticed that this article begs the question which specific foods this dye is in. The article would be improved if someone could include a sentence or two listing a few specific examples of particular foods or food brands that use the dye. Dugwiki 21:27, 7 June 2007 (UTC)
– Yes, this Wasabi contains E133 http://www.sb-worldwide.com/wasabi/ Prokaryotes (talk) 16:04, 26 July 2013 (UTC)

WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

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Colour index?[edit]

What does colour index mean in this context? Shinobu (talk) 00:17, 21 August 2008 (UTC)

Found the reference to this and added it. Furt1v3ly (talk) 01:36, 6 September 2008 (UTC)

Wrong Picture[edit]

That is the molecule of Fast Green (and is even present in the Fast Green FCF article) --DMP47 (talk) 21:50, 7 October 2009 (UTC)

The structures are not the same. They differ by a OH group. --Leyo 11:18, 8 October 2009 (UTC)
Thanks for the clarification! --DMP47 (talk) 21:25, 8 October 2009 (UTC)

Medical use[edit]

The medical use section referred to research on another compount, the Coomassie dye Brilliant Blue G. This is a common mistake, so I'll mention it in the article, though i'm not entirely sure where to do so - it certainly doesnt merit its own section. 17:37, 14 January 2010 (UTC)

I'm going to fix it to clarify the difference and link to the Coomassie Blue/Brilliant Blue G article. The problem with removing it entirely is that the very popular Wired magazine article on the rat study incorrectly says that this dye (Brilliant Blue FCF/FD&C blue 1) was the one used, so people will keep adding it back if we just delete it. Xenobiologista (talk) 03:57, 1 April 2010 (UTC)

Retinal surgery[edit]

User:219.119.212.101 challenged a claim made in this section by leaving a comment in the middle of the article:

”Under the trade name Brilliant Peel, brilliant blue is used as a stain to assist surgeons in retinal surgery.” is not correct. Brilliant Peel contains BBG250 but not BBG FCF http://www.fluoron.de/downloads/0177_Brilliant%20Peel_Flyer_E.pdf

I've just moved the comment to the talk page here. --McGeddon (talk) 13:26, 11 May 2010 (UTC)

Question[edit]

Can roe be colored with this? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 195.14.207.45 (talk) 14:05, 5 July 2010 (UTC)

I want to know WHY BRILLIANT BLUE is BANNED in the COUNTRIES[edit]

There must be a reason..... WHY? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.32.57.173 (talk) 00:30, 13 November 2010 (UTC)

I see no source showing that it is or was "banned". Sometimes the natural food crowd says that something that does not have required approval is "banned", which might be what is happening here. A new additive must be approved. That is not the same as a previously approved additive being banned. - SummerPhD (talk) 17:33, 4 November 2013 (UTC)

Brilliant blue IS BANNED in several countries, as in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Norway, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. See more:

ekoodit.fi/E133/briljanttisininen-fcf/ http://www.ukfoodguide.net/e133.htm — Preceding unsigned comment added by 91.154.26.101 (talk) 17:05, 1 March 2014 (UTC)

In the article, you cited the Daily Mail. Yikes. Their sensationalistic coverage states repeatedly that various additives "cause" various diseases. The few that I am familiar with are cases where individual studies suggested a possible link, calling for further study (which generally were unable to substantiate the claim). Next, you cite two sources here whose reliability I am unable to determine. The first is in a mixture of languages from a source I am unable to identify. It claims the additive "was banned in the past". The second source is ukfoodguide.net. Who are they? Well, all their site says is that the site is by UK Food Guide. If they have a "reputation for fact-checking and accuracy", it is not self-evident. If you would like to add that the additive is OMG!!!!BANNED is 3 bazillion countries around the world because it kills everyone who gets within 10 km of it, you will need reliable sources saying that. - SummerPhD (talk) 23:07, 1 March 2014 (UTC)

reference [5] is a dead link[edit]

I also see in the talk that credence has been given to a 1979 study to justify removing health related sentances. A lot of research has been done in the past 33 years that would likely give a different answer

oh and reference [5] is supposedly a broacher? really? that's what counts as a source offering health and safety advice on wikipedia now days? Really? I think I will use a place-mat from McDonalds as a source and quote the hamburgler — Preceding unsigned comment added by 114.76.198.52 (talk) 13:54, 21 February 2012 (UTC)

Intolerance/Allergy[edit]

Concerning the statement "It has the capacity for inducing an allergic reaction in individuals with pre-existing moderate asthma. [5] (J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.; VOL 64 ISS Jul 1979, P32-37, (REF 25))" I recently deduced that Brilliant Blue was the cause of my bouts of digestive problems. I am not asthmatic. Is there an explanation for this? Furoar (talk) 02:04, 1 April 2013 (UTC)

Talk pages are for discussing improvement to articles, not general discussion of the topic (or questions better asked of a medical professional.) - SummerPhD (talk) 17:35, 4 November 2013 (UTC)