Talk:Brittleness

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what is the relation b\w brittleness and density?

- None :
Tungsten is heavy (19.25  g·cm−3) and can be brittle
Lead is heavy (11.34  g·cm−3) and malleable (Lead glass on the other hand is brittle as well as heavy : 6  g·cm−3)
Graphite is light (2.09–2.23 g/cm³) and brittle
Aluminium is also rather light (2.70 g·cm−3) and malleable

"When used in materials science, it is generally applied to materials that fail in tension rather than shear"

I don't see why it should fail in tension more than shear. It might be true for bending where external fibers would break sooner than for a malleable material, but tension ? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.12.218.218 (talk) 12:10, 20 November 2007 (UTC)

Definition[edit]

"A material is brittle if it is liable to fracture when subjected to stress."

This is a very unsatisfactory definition of "brittle", since all materials (including ductile ones) will fracture/fail when subjected to sufficient stress. The term brittle refers to those materials that fail under stress without significant (plastic) deformation/strain, i.e. prior to the onset of general yielding. I invite discussion as to whether or not to include the word 'plastic' in the definition; a rubber band, when stretched at room temperature, will fail without deforming plastically even though the(elastic) strain may be over 100%. This doesn't really fit the general perception of brittle behaviour. It may therefore be better to omit 'plastic', and talk simply in terms of failure without significant [elastic or plastic] deformation. --Amgreen (talk) 13:38, 13 October 2010 (UTC)

Sounds good to me, feel free to fix it. Wizard191 (talk) 17:49, 13 October 2010 (UTC)