Talk:Broadcast license

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Global view[edit]

This article should cover broadcast licenses under a worldwide perspective, not limited to US broadcasting JRSP 15:58, 4 January 2007 (UTC)

I've laid the foundations, but there's room for discussion of broadcast licencing in specific countries to expand the article. -- Rob.au 12:56, 27 February 2007 (UTC)
See Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Radio Stations#Call sign musical chairs (or more likely the talk page archives by the time you read this) for some relevant discussion. Andrewa (talk) 20:31, 12 January 2012 (UTC)
This article is actually really awful. Not only is it missing citations, but it doesn't clearly differentiate between those aspects of licensing that are universal (or nearly so) and those which are specific to the one regulatory authority it covers in any length, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. At a minimum, it ought to cover the major English-speaking countries and at least a few other countries that have reasonably well-documented regulatory structures and are meaningfully different in terms of mechanism or outcome. There should also be a history section concentrating on the historical development of broadcast licensing, starting with the various ITU radio conferences. Some countries and topics that ought to be covered:
  • United States: "Broadcasting by the American Plan"; conservatism of early commercial broadcasters and opposition to government-owned or -directed broadcasting of any kind; development of regulatory regime from Commerce Dept. (including Supreme Court ruling that Commerce's regulation of broadcast spectrum was ultra vires) to Radio Act of 1927 to Communications Act of 1934 to Telecommunications Act of 1996
  • United Kingdom: Early domination by the BBC under a public-service mandate (but nominally independent of the state); invention of the radio receiver licence fee; comparatively late development of "independent" (commercial) broadcasting (contrast Monaco, Luxembourg; compare France); changes in independent commercial broadcasting regulation post-Thatcher
  • Canada: The CRBC/CBC as both regulator and public broadcaster; unpopularity of and eventual abolition of licence fee; early domination of the airwaves by U.S. programs; development of modern regulation by format, musical genre, language, and size of advertising market; split of regulation between CRTC and whatever the spectrum agency is called this year
  • Pick a country that makes use of national franchises or license auctions as the primary means of licensing private broacasters (and is large enough that a national service implies more than one transmitter)
  • Find a good case-study country that previously had an entirely state-controlled broadcasting system but liberalized after the end of the Cold War, and find a reliable source for how it turned out in terms of market structure, regulatory regime, influence of government/state broadcasting agency, etc.
There should be good reliable sources for all of these. For the U.S., look in back issues of Broadcasting and other trade journals. (Broadcasting also has good coverage of Canada in the pre-war period, and includes occasional reports from other countries such as the UK.) For Canada, I'd probably start with The Microphone Wars for most of the early history, dominated as it was by fights between the proponents of a BBC-style broadcasting system and the commercial broadcasters. 121a0012 (talk) 04:58, 14 January 2012 (UTC)