Talk:Bromotrifluoromethane

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Mechanism of function[edit]

How does it work?LorenzoB 05:35, 13 August 2007 (UTC)

See Gaseous fire suppression, "Inhibiting the chain reaction of the above components". Fireproeng 01:08, 14 August 2007 (UTC)

Danger[edit]

In around 1990 I used to work in data centre that had a number of large mainframe computers and the whole computer room was protected by a halon-flooding system. The halon was stored in a number of green pressurised containers IIRC. We were told that the danger was not so much in the halon itself, but in the fact that the the gas was inert and so when used in a fire it filled the room replacing most of the air, leading to possible suffocation for anyone still inside. Hence the need to rapidly evacuate the room should the fire alarm sound, the halon system being triggered automatically. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.112.68.219 (talk) 15:11, 13 July 2011 (UTC)
I was told the Halon itself at the design - lower percentage is NO danger, no suffocation threat directly. However, the rapid evacuation is for setting A tight seal on space. A inrush of fresh air can lower percentage to level that a reflash can occur. Also if a fire is hot enough it might cause Halon to decompose, and decomposition results gases not certainly are not good for humans (some results are close if not the same as Chemical Warfare gases) 02:49, 19 January 2013 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Wfoj2 (talkcontribs)

Danger[edit]

In around 1990 I used to work in data centre that had a number of large mainframe computers and the whole computer room was protected by a halon-flooding system. The halon was stored in a number of green pressurised containers IIRC. We were told that the danger was not so much in the halon itself, but in the fact that the the gas was inert and so when used in a fire it filled the room replacing most of the air, leading to possible suffocation for anyone still inside. Hence the need to rapidly evacuate the room should the fire alarm sound, the halon system being triggered automatically. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.112.68.219 (talk) 15:14, 13 July 2011 (UTC)