Talk:Bronchodilator

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While short acting beta-2 agonists generally have considerably less cardiac manifestations than Beta-1 agonists, it is completely inaccurate to say that they do not have cardiac effects. If you look for newer long acting bronchodilator safety studies on pubmed, there are studies where the newer drug increases heart rate 5-8 compared to salbutamol's 12-15 bpm increase. Additionally there are Beta-2 receptors within the myocardium. I am therefore find the article to not be trustworthy and in need of editing. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.147.40.99 (talk) 11:57, 7 April 2011 (UTC)


While short acting beta-2 agonists generally have less cardiac effects than Beta-1 agonists, it is completely inaccurate to say they do not have cardiac effects. If you look for newer long acting bronchodilator safety studies on pubmed, there are studies where the newer drug increases heart rate 5-8 compared to salbutamol's 12-15 bpm increase. Additionally, despite what the article says, there are in fact Beta-2 receptors in the myocardium. Therefore the article is not trustworthy and needs editing. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.147.40.99 (talk) 12:00, 7 April 2011 (UTC)

THC?[edit]

I have read that Tetrahydrocannabinol (the active ingredient in cannabis) is a bronchodilator. I don't have a source, but if I find one this probably merits inclusion in this article, correct? Andre (talk) 02:19, 28 May 2007 (UTC)

I don't really like the idea of having Marijuana on a list of 'commonly used bronchodilators'. Just did a very quick google which showed a few links but none looked very reliable. Still, I'm not going to dispute it's action... just it being listed s a commonly used bronchodilator. For now I'll just move it to the bottom of the list I think.McPat (talk) 02:59, 23 November 2008 (UTC)


Tiotropium: I was surprised that there is no mention of Tiotropium bromide, a long-acting bronchodilator which has been on the market for enough time to have several studies published (not to mention Cochrane systematic review).Felinity 14:20, 26 August 2007 (UTC)

Racemic Epinephrine[edit]

Epinephrine and Racepinephrine should have its own paragraph or two. I was hoping to find some information on those two Wikipedia articles but those were rather thin.

I added Racemic Epinephrine as a short term dialator. It is made by the same company that made Primatene Mist. This is significant because it is a replacement for Primatene Mist which was a widely used over the counter Bronchodilator. It is the only Bronchodilator that can be diluted with breathable saline for those that cannot tolerate full strength Pharmaceutical Bronchodialators. For long term use, Bronchodilators should be used with a steroid.

Primatene Mist using a new EPA aprove propellent is waiting on FDA approval.

There are a lot of details about using Bronchodillators that Doctors will tell you but cannot be used a Wikipedia source.