Talk:Bulgarian Orthodox Church

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i am suprised how some people are ready to comment with their poor knowledge[edit]

how you dare to say that it was of political reason when we all know the Otoman empire was muslim.

I am not so sure about the issue of forced conversions and burning down of "most" Bulgarian churches. A couple of examples would help support that claim. If they did happen it seems that they would be for political reasons rather than religious since it would have been done by an Ottoman Empire, which among other things claimed it legitimacy in being home to the Eastern Orthodox Patriarchate and bieng the succesor of the Byzentine Empire.

  You are “not so sure”? – don’t comment if you are "not so sure"!
                                                   Sure One  —Preceding unsigned comment added by 142.166.210.242 (talk) 20:36, 29 May 2009 (UTC) 

Neutrality concerns[edit]

I'm concerned about this article's neutrality. Phrases like "The Bulgarian Orthodox Church is an inseparable member of the one, holy, synodal and apostolic church" don't seem up to Wikipedia's standards on neutrality and objectivity. I don't know much about the topic at hand, so I don't feel qualified to edit for content here. Partly this could be a language issue; it may be that the author did not intend to imply value judgments with terms such as "barbaric raids and incursions" or "the surrounding Slavic mass[es]," but regardless of the origin, I think it leaves the article in need of repair. -KD

Alternative orthodox[edit]

Also it would be useful to have something on the schism that began in 1992 when Patriarch Maxim's election was declared illegal. I know this led to 250-odd alternative priests being evicted in 2004 and the case is being fought in the European Court of Human Rights; a history of the Church that neglects to even mention this ongoing turmoil can only be presumed to be heavily biased.

Bibliographical suggestions for the modern history of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church[edit]

The entire article on the Bulgarian Orthodox Church needs serious editing. The history of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church from the restoration of the Bulgarian statehood in 1878 to World War II was studied in details by Stefan Tsankov. His book "Balgarskata pravoslavna tsarkva ot Osvobozhdenieto do nashi dni" [The Bulgarian Orthodox Church from the Liberation (1878) to nowadays (1939], GSU-BF [Annual Book of Sofia University - Faculty of Theology], Sofia, vol. XVI (1938/1939) is the best source for this period. Unfortunatelly the development of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church during World War II remains de facto a black spot in the religious history of Bulgaria. Concerning the history of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church under communism during the period 1944-1953 it is better to read the monograph by Daniela Kalkandjieva in her monograph "Balgarskata pravoslavna tsarkva i darzhavata, 1944-1953" [The Bulgarian Orthodox Church and the State], (Sofia: Albatros, 1997), published in Bulgarian. She was the first scholar who used the materials kept in the archives of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, the Bulgarian Communist Party, State institutions, etc., which had become accessible for scholars after 1989. More recently she published new study on the same subject in English. See: “The Bulgarian Orthodox Church and the Cold War” In: Eastern Christianity and the Cold War ( London, New York: Routledge, 2010). 76-95. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Urdoviza (talkcontribs) 06:50, 25 June 2010 (UTC)

Flawed/biased information[edit]

Bulgaria has estimated 7.5 mil population. Of them 9.4% (according to wikipedia) ethnic turks, mostly muslim. There is no way 6.5 mil are christians. That would include almost every bulgarian, leaving about 0.25 mil atheists, and other non-christians/non-believers, and thats definitely not the case. Please, if anyone has the right numbers - fix it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Contributions ([[User talk:|talk]]) 15:57, 2 August 2010 (UTC)

Hmm, you seem to be forgetting those living outside of the country. --Laveol T 17:30, 2 August 2010 (UTC)
They are mentioned in the article as "and between 1.5 and 2.0 million members in a number of European countries, the Americas and Australia."

Nationalist bias - insufficient info - actuality missing[edit]

Since 2 years (Aug. 2, 2010) no one bothered about this article.

The chapter "Ottoman rule" is grossly exaggerated. Ere nationalism and romanticism got imported from Europe , Turks systematically neither razed churches nor executed clerics.

No mention that the non-recognized Bg. Exarch resided till 1913 in the same Constantinople as the OEcumenic Patriarch. No mention of the interbellic 30 years. And WHY was recognition all over sudden possible in 1945?

"the Church and the Communist Party coexisted in a closely symbiotic partnership, in which each supported the other". I do not say this is wrong, but the wording is stark polemic.

And sheer silence about the last 25 years with all their bitter internal feuds & struggles - for which no external scapegoats like Turks, Greeks or Communists can be made responsible.

Article in bad need of clean-up. No idea how it managed to reap such good ratings from my four - 4! - predecessors. Nuremberg/Bavaria Ángel García 131.188.3.21 (talk) 20:40, 8 August 2012 (UTC)

Since 1990 - S I L E N C E[edit]

In der engl,

der bulgar.,

der German,

der franz. Wikipedia: absolutes Schweigen über die bitteren Streitereien um die Rechtmäszigkeit. What is happening here? Is there anyone systematically deleting Updates?(esp. bulgar. Version)?

Nuremberg / Bavaria Ángel García 131.188.3.21 (talk) 21:26, 8 August 2012 (UTC)