Talk:Bushwhacker

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Untitled[edit]

Htt —Preceding unsigned comment added by 170.211.227.254 (talk) 13:45, 14 March 2008 (UTC)

bushwacker after Civil war[edit]

Bushwacker took the meaning of one who attacks from hiding. In my childhood it was a common insult used in cowboy movies: you dirty lily-livered back-shooting bushwacker. Nitpyck (talk) 20:59, 13 April 2009 (UTC)


Collapse of Kansas City Jail[edit]

http://penningtons.tripod.com/scv1.htm This isn't mentioned under atrocities, although it was certainly thought to have been deliberate at the time. It deserves some mention in the article to be sure. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Throwawaygull (talkcontribs) 12:57, 4 September 2010 (UTC)

Deleted American Revolutionary War stuff[edit]

It looked to be mostly taken from popular myth (the whole dumb-Brits-lining-up-to-be-shot thing) and was riddled with inaccuracies (frontiersmen of the 1770s would have used rifles, not muskets) and anachronisms ("Unlawful Enemy Combatants", "Combat Fireteam"). If anyone wants to take a stab at a well-referenced account, be my guest.--Otterfan (talk) 20:03, 26 March 2010 (UTC)

Confederate era vs. general use of term[edit]

Seems to me the article was first about the Confederate Bushwhackers of Missouri - the latter half seems to support this. However, now the first half seeks to generalize the term to apply to other guerilla conflicts, or to groups who may have bushwhacked others. A tad confusing... Best, A Sniper (talk) 04:50, 7 May 2012 (UTC)

A case could be made for the common usage of the term bushwacker to refer exclusively to the Confederate Bushwhackers of Missouri, and yet they are not even mentioned in the lead paragraph. Johnfancy (talk) 22:06, 20 August 2012 (UTC)

Guess it depends on how much you are into the Civil War and the Missouri-Kansas conflict in particular. I am more familiar with the more generalized idea of someone who attacks from hiding, probably from this usage in Westerns, as mentioned above. It can also be used figuratively in reference to an unexpected happening, particularly one which is perceived as negative. Wschart (talk) 16:10, 26 September 2014 (UTC)