Talk:COBOL

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Computing / Software (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computing, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of computers, computing, and information technology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Software (marked as High-importance).
 
WikiProject Computer science (Rated B-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computer science, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Computer science related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Current total for lines of COBOL programs[edit]

The article (based on 1981 data?) claims that little new code is being written in Cobol. A more current estimate is at 5 billion codelines a year, so perhaps it depends on the definition of "little"... (See for instance http://www.cobolwebler.com/cobolfacts.htm, citing Gartner Group as a source.) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.111.138.138 (talk) 20:05, 9 February 2004‎

Strange use of second generation language[edit]

Where does come your use of second generation language: it is usually reserved for assembly languages. -- Hgfernan 12 May 2004

I agree. COBOL is a third generation language. other examples of third generation languages would be FORTRAN and BASIC. If someone else doesn't correct it soon I may do so. It is a clear mistake. enhandle nov 2004 — Preceding unsigned comment added by Enhandle (talkcontribs) 02:48, 14 November 2004‎

CoBOL or COBOL?[edit]

This isn't a big deal to me, but did anyone else learn it as "CoBOL" (Common Business Oriented Language)? Any old-schoolers out there who learned on punch cards? Woo-hoo! Lightbreather (talk) 00:38, 26 July 2014 (UTC)

I only ever saw it written as COBOL, but often wondered how a lower case "o" became an upper case "O" in the acronym. HiLo48 (talk) 02:03, 27 July 2014 (UTC)
@Lightbreather: I think it's just because everything was all caps (sixbit) in the early days... FORTRAN was all-caps too. The good ol' days before that was CONSIDERED SHOUTING & UNCIVIL. Yup, I learned on punch cards, and before that... BASIC on punched tape – the same way Bill Gates learned it. Check out Timeline of DOS operating systems. Wbm1058 (talk) 02:38, 29 July 2014 (UTC)
Most programming languages (and operating systems) were originally spelled all-caps. A very incomplete list of examples: COBOL, FORTRAN, LISP, BASIC, BAL, RPG, ALGOL, PL/I, SNOBOL, CPL, BCPL, etc. The Pascal language appears to be the first one (ca. 1970) that changed the trend, so now we see names like Perl, Java, Haskell, Python, etc., as well as renamings of the old languages, e.g., LISP is now spelled as "Lisp". — Loadmaster (talk) 20:47, 15 January 2015 (UTC)

COBOL isn't influenced by C++[edit]

How in the world is COBOL influenced by C++ or any other language noted in the sidebar? The side box needs to be fixed, as it is simply erronous. 199.212.69.109 (talk) 17:23, 15 January 2015 (UTC)

From the Cobol '97 status report(provided as a reference in the article):

The draft 1997 proposal for Cobol incorporates the basic object-oriented programming capabilities found in C++ and Smalltalk (see Table 1): inheritance, which allows objects to inherit data and behaviors from other objects; polymorphism, which simplifies coding by letting programmers use a single interface to access objects of different classes; and encapsulation, which hides the implementation of data and methods from clients (user code), thereby protecting clients from the effects of implementation change.

Martijn Hoekstra (talk)

So it would be accurate to say that COBOL 2002 (the object-oriented version of COBOL), or more precisely, the enhancements made to COBOL 2002, was influenced by C++. — Loadmaster (talk) 20:38, 15 January 2015 (UTC)
I've added notes clarifying that C++ and Smalltalk only influenced COBOL 2002's OO features. EdwardH (talk) 19:41, 17 January 2015 (UTC)