Talk:Calcio Fiorentino

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Mulcaster[edit]

Until I removed it, this article used to say --

Because Calcio originally attracted a sophisticated class of people, it had an impact of international proportions. British schoolmaster Richard Mulcaster mentions an English version of mob football, influenced by Calcio, in his 1561 treatise on the education of the young.

I know a few websites state that Mulcaster mentions a game played in England influenced by Calcio; but this appears to be pure editorialising.

In his publication of 1581, "Positions Wherein Those Primitive Circumstances Be Examined, Which Are Necessarie for the Training up of Children" [1], Richard Mulcaster wrote the following ....

.. The second kinde I make the Footeball play, which could not possibly have growne to this greatnes, that it is now at, nor have bene so much used, as it is in all places, if it had not had great helpes, both to health and strength, and to me the abuse of it is a sufficient argument, that it hath a right use: which being revoked to his primative will both helpe, strength, and comfort nature: though as it is now commonly used, with thronging of a rude multitude, with bursting of shinnes, and breaking of legges, it be neither civil, neither worthy the name of any traine to health. Wherin any man may evidently see the use of the trayning [105] maister. For if one stand by, which can judge of the play, and is judge over the parties, and hath authoritie to commaunde in the place, all those inconveniences have bene, I know, and wilbe I am sure very lightly redressed, nay they will never entermedle in the matter, neither shall there be complaint, where there is no cause. Some smaller number with such overlooking, sorted into sides and standings, not meeting with their bodies so boisterously to trie their strength: nor shouldring or shuffing one an other so barbarously, and using to walke after, may use footeball for as much good to the body, by the chiefe use of the legges, as the Armeball, for the same, by the use of the armes. And being so used, the Footeball strengtheneth and brawneth the whole body, and by provoking superfluities downeward, it dischargeth the head, and upper partes, it is good for the bowells, and to drive downe the stone and gravell from both the bladder and kidneies. It helpeth weake hammes, by much moving, beginning at a meane, and simple shankes by thickening of the flesh, no lesse then riding doth. Yet rash running and to much force oftentimes breaketh some inward conduit, and bringeth ruptures.
There is no mention of Calcio as played in Florence. I have therefore removed the former text. Jooler 18:21, 10 Apr 2005 (UTC)
Then again it does not say there was a mention of Calcio, rather it says he mentions an English version of mob football influenced by Calcio. In fact he quite frequently mentions Romans and their culture where they played harpastum... Libro0 04:48, 9 October 2007 (UTC)

Picture fom 1688[edit]

From where did you get the name Harald er stjerna? I could'nt find it anywhere else and even in the book (source) there's Alessandro Cecchini (etching). I would rather change this if there's no proof...134.76.162.163 (talk) 15:53, 16 June 2012 (UTC)

BBC reference[edit]

I'm not sure that the reference to bridge fighting is relevant to this article.

In 1574 Henry III of France attended a game of "bridge fighting" - put on in his honor during a visit to Venice; the king is recorded as saying: "Too small to be a real war and too cruel to be a game".[2]

One might be led to believe that the quote is referring to Calcio Storico, which I think would be misleading. From my reading of that article the games were very different, only related by their use as outlets for civic tensions. Thoughts? --Mrow84 (talk) 12:33, 14 July 2013 (UTC)