Talk:Calico (textile)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Textile Arts (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Textile Arts, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of textile arts on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the importance scale.
 
WikiProject India / Kerala (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject India, which aims to improve Wikipedia's coverage of India-related topics. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Kerala (marked as Mid-importance).
 
Note icon
This article was last assessed in May 2012.

The link "http://www.globalpolicy.org/globaliz/econ/2003/1021jobflight.htm" does not really belong here - I can only see one tiny mention of Calico on the linked page - that hardly counts as a "history"?

Calico definition[edit]

It is hard to explain my concerns with offending- but if you read [1] you will see that the Calico Printers Association, a very large employer is mentioned, and maybe you can see where I am coming from. If you were to read The Rise of Calico Printing in Europe and the Influence of Asia in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Giorgio Riello there are 146 references to this form of cotton. I find the current article lacking in rigour and erroneous. This is not my field but I will be prepared to be bold if no-one else cares to take up the challenge. --ClemRutter (talk) 01:21, 9 January 2010 (UTC)

US vs Commonwealth terms have inadequate definition[edit]

Specifically, the Commonwealth side. "Muslin gauze" is defined simply as "Muslin", and "Cheesecloth" as "Gauze". Right. Because that's so helpful in telling us what meaning the terms are actually meant to convey?

I would suppose whoever wrote it (or altered it to read this way) may have meant to relate the CW terms to the US ones - IE, "Cheesecloth" in the UK means the same as "Gauze" in the United States - but if that's an accurate guess, the meaning isn't actually clear in the text, and it's still a poor way of laying it out even vs just copying and pasting the US "Gauze" definition into the CW "Cheesecloth" line. Plus it also adds a needlessly Americocentric bias to a global resource.

Can someone with a decent knowledge of fabrics clarify for us? Because I came here to find out which was which, so I am unable to actually contribute a meaningful fix :( 193.63.174.211 (talk) 14:56, 11 May 2012 (UTC)

A bit of nonsense[edit]

QUOTE: Calico (in British usage, 1505,[1] AmE "muslin") is a plain-woven textile made from unbleached, and often not fully processed, cotton. END of Quote

See this link QUOTE: Calico originated in Calicut, India, by the 11th century, if not earlier, and in the 17th and 18th centuries calicoes were an important commodity traded between India and Europe.END of QUOTE

Certainly the term Calico might not British. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 117.214.26.99 (talk) 13:16, 24 July 2014 (UTC)