Talk:Camellia sinensis

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Japanese variety?[edit]

I recall reading somewhere that the Japanese green tea is made of a special variety of Camellia Sinensis, something like var Japonica or a similar addition. I will look it up later. --Gabi S. 20:11, 10 June 2006 (UTC)

This kind? It redirects you to the "Camellia" page but it's on the list. --Moop stick 21:10, 10 June 2006 (UTC)

OK, I looked it up. The Japanese variety is seldom mentioned (for example here), and it is indeed confusing that the Camellia japonica is ornamental and not used for tea. This page says that there is no such thing as an independent Japanese variety, and the erroneously-depicted Camellia sinensis var japonica is actually a subspecies of the Camellia sinensis.
By the way, someone here says that the Cambodian variety is often considered a hybrid of var sinesis and va assamica (only two varieties are listed in the plants classification guide). So the Cambodian variety is also a subspecies, and the article should be corrected accordingly. --Gabi S. 08:37, 11 June 2006 (UTC)

HK Variety?[edit]

This article and the main tea article list four botanical types of the tea plant (china, cambodia, assam, hong kong), but almost everywhere else the number is listed as three (china, cambodia, assam). Yet this article also implies that the HK variety is incorrect or really part of the china variety. If this is true, then HK should not get a full heading, and the number should be listed as "3". As for other varieties *such as japanese), there are apparently hundreds of hybrids, and moreover, just within the china variety there are six main sub-categories and hundreds of individuals types of tea plants.

Caffiene[edit]

Does Camellia sinensis have caffiene in it? All of the articles say nothing on this subject or I am just missing it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.4.136.120 (talk) 17:47, 15 October 2008 (UTC)

Yes it does, although only half as much as coffee

Source: the back of my Dilmah teabag. 203.184.3.99 (talk) 23:51, 14 January 2009 (UTC)

The article has been rearranged to accommodating a section of....[edit]

Nomenclature and taxonomy. In addition to that, whoever can access to the following articles, please add relevant infos to this article.

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?as_q=camellia+sinensis+taxonomy&num=10&btnG=Search+Scholar&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_occt=title&as_sauthors=&as_publication=&as_ylo=&as_yhi=&as_allsubj=all&hl=en&lr=&newwindow=1 --222.64.16.233 (talk) 22:40, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&lr=&newwindow=1&q=allintitle%3A+camellia+sinensis+classification&btnG=Search --222.64.16.233 (talk) 22:42, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

According to IPNI (international plant name index) the basionym of this plant is Camellia thea, and not Camellia chinensis (which appears to be a later synonym) Any opinions on this one? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.211.171.228 (talk) 13:26, 5 January 2010 (UTC)

A section of Cultivars....[edit]

has been added too, based on the following infos http://scholar.google.com/scholar?as_q=camellia+sinensis+cultivars&num=10&btnG=Search+Scholar&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_occt=title&as_sauthors=&as_publication=&as_ylo=&as_yhi=&as_allsubj=all&hl=en&lr=&newwindow=1 --222.64.16.233 (talk) 22:47, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

Cultivation in UK - history[edit]

[cross posted to Tea]
There is a note in Curtis's 4275 (1847) on the attempts to smuggle the plant and seed into England.

Many are the disappointments and delays of Science! It was not till after Tea had been used as a beverage for upwards of a century in England, that the shrub which produces it was brought alive to this country. More than one botanist had embarked for the voyage to China,–till lately a protracted and formidable undertaking,–mainly in the hope of introducing a growing Tea-tree in our Greenhouses. No passage across the Desert, no Waghorn-facilities, no steam-ship, assisted the traveller in those days. The distance to and from China, with the necessary time spent in that country, generally consumed nearly three years! Once had the Tea-tree been procured by Osbeck, pupil of Linnaeus, in spite of the jealous care with which the Chinese forbade its exportation; and, when near the coast of England, a storm ensued, which destroyed the precious shrubs. Then, the plan of obtaining berries was adopted, and frustrated by the heat of the tropics, which spoiled the oily seeds and prevented their germination. The Captain of a Swedish vessel hit upon a good scheme; having secured fresh berries, he sowed these on board ship, and often stinted himself of his daily allowance of water, for the sake of the young plants; but just as the ship entered the channel, an unlucky rat attacked his cherished charge and devoured them all! ... the facilities of communicating with foreign countries are very different now from what they were in the days of Linnæus and of the first importation of the Tea-Shrub!

I see several facts that could be included, if someone elects to improve the article they might be able to verify these with other sources. cygnis insignis 10:32, 5 August 2009 (UTC)

Very Primitive Article[edit]

For example, which varieties have red flowers? Which can be grown in containers? How are they cultivated?

Nothing on the opium-tea trade. (By the way, there is no such thing as a "native" variety of Assamese tea, all come from China which forbade the export of the plants and seeds, the major cause of the so-called "Opium War" -- The Chinese used its tea monopoly to drain the world of silver, but refused to buy anything but opium. After they addicted the British to tea, Chinese officials destroyed the opium, forcing the British to fight or drink coffee. They fought.) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.111.71.197 (talk) 04:11, 5 February 2010 (UTC)

POV nonsense[edit]

Many high quality teas are grown at high elevations, up to 1500 meters (5,000 ft), as the plants grow more slowly and acquire a better flavour.

Because of the specific growing conditions Darjeeling tea is considered by tea lovers[which?] to be the finest of the Indian teas.

This POV rubbish unsupported by citations. Darjeeling and Assam are very different teas. They are different varieties, grown in different parts of India, at very different elevations. These differences produce very different results. Some people prefer Darjeeling but this tea-lover prefers Assam, I doubt I am alone.

When I saw this first I went about editing it, but I didn't see an easy way to make it a NPOV whilst retaining the information about Darjeeling. If anyone else would like to try, I encourage you. Otherwise I'll come back later after a few more cups of Assam and my brain in gear!

At any rate I just wanted it noted that this not just a fact missing a citation but an opinion that can never have one. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Meltyman ( talkcontribs) 11:39, 3 March 2010 (UTC)

Hi, I've been getting the Swedish Wikipedia up to speed on a lot of tea articles. I find this information to be quite valuable, yet hard to find good sources for. I suggest doing as I have on the Swedish Wiki, and instead of citing crude sources (which most people never check) luring readers into not questioning what's written I would write the above as following.
"Many high quality teas are grown at high elevations, up to 1500 meters (5,000 ft), this is believed by many to make the plants grow more slowly and thus acquire a better flavour."
"Because of the specific growing conditions Darjeeling tea is considered by many tea lovers to be the finest of the Indian teas."
I realise this is just adding weasel words to the article, but as most of this is speculative "tea lore" shared between tea lovers (and relevant to people wanting to know more about tea), I think it's better than the alternatives 1) adding non-credible sources just for the sake of adding sources; 2) Leaving it as is; 3) Removing it.
I can see that this has now been removed, I suggest adding it again. *oolong sip oolong sip* --Kaminix (talk) 21:07, 28 November 2010 (UTC)
The proposed solution is not better, because we do not know if ðese opinions are held by many or by a few…
189.61.24.117 (talk) 20:01, 5 February 2012 (UTC)

You can change any subjective superlative (e.g. better, finer or tastier) to different and everyone can agree.

Binomial name authority and history[edit]

Would it not be ðe case ðat Linnæus named it Þea sinensis, and Kuntze shifted it to ðe Camellia genus? Ðe story given at Camellia siensis#Nomenclature and taxonomy does not seem consistent wiþ ðe auþority given in ðe name of Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze, which seems to imply Linnæus first named it someþing oðer ðan Camellia. Or did I read it wrong?
189.61.24.117 (talk) 20:01, 5 February 2012 (UTC)

Boston Cooking School Cook Book, 1896, Pages 36 and 37[edit]

The tea plant is referred to as Thea, not Camellia, in the book: "All tea is grown from one species of shrub, Thea, the leaves of which constitute the tea of commerce. ... First-quality tea is made from young, whole leaves. Two kinds of tea are considered:- Black tea, made from leaves which have been allowed to ferment before curing. Green tea, made from unfermented leaves artificially colored." 198.151.130.37 (talk) 03:50, 20 December 2012 (UTC)