Talk:Campus novel

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WikiProject Novels (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
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I know that the Eating People is Wrong addition looks like vandalism, but it really is an example of the genre. Lujack 14:06, 23 December 2005 (UTC)

Removing a couple of examples[edit]

I've removed two examples (WALDEN & A Dancing Bear) that don't seem sufficiently notable for inclusion in a selective list. Espresso Addict 00:45, 23 August 2007 (UTC)

"Disgrace" in my view does not belong here[edit]

I'm suprprised to find Coetzees "Disgrace" here and I doubt that those who put it here actually have read it. According to the article's intro, a campus novel is "a novel whose main action is set in and around the campus of a university." This is not true concerning "Disgrace". It is true that the novel's plot is triggered by what one university professor does with a young student, and eventually he even gets back to where everything started in a somewhat failed attempt to make things good. But the main action takes place in an entirely different setting.

84.154.10.131 (talk) 07:31, 23 August 2010 (UTC)

founding[edit]

  • I'm no expert, but what's the basis for claiming this genre dates in great extent from the 1950s? There were a number of popular "college novels" in the U.S. in the 1920s, including This Side of Paradise and The Plastic Age.--Milowenthasspoken 21:33, 6 August 2012 (UTC)