Talk:Cancer

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Former good article Cancer was one of the Natural sciences good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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To Maintaining Low Blood Sugar as a New Cancer Treatment[edit]

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Evilstriver (talkcontribs) 08:21, 23 September 2009‎

(Unqualified) use of tobacco increases the risk of cancer?![edit]

Thermography[edit]

Advantages of thermography[edit]

It shows a visual picture so temperatures over a large area can be compared
It is capable of catching moving targets in real time
It is able to find deteriorating, i.e., higher temperature components prior to their failure
It can be used to measure or observe in areas inaccessible or hazardous for other methods
It is a non-destructive test method
It can be used to find defects in shafts, pipes, and other metal or plastic parts[5]
It can be used to detect objects in dark areas
It has some medical application, essentially in kinesiotherapy


...........................................................................

It is a non-destructive test method

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermography#Advantages_of_thermography

176.24.38.232 (talk) 00:54, 15 February 2014 (UTC)

This article is about cancer. We need high quality sources. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) (if I write on your page reply on mine) 01:04, 15 February 2014 (UTC)

Primary sourced content[edit]

I've just removed a large amount of primary-sourced content from the Epigenetics section. I have copied it here in case anyone can find anything useful. Sunrise (talk) 07:56, 8 March 2014 (UTC)

Treatment versus management[edit]

IMO management is a better term when it comes to cancer as most cases of cancer are not simply treated with a 7 day course of anything. While the two terms mean more or less the same management implies greater difficulty which is the cause. Others thoughts? Doc James (talk · contribs · email) (if I write on your page reply on mine) 04:53, 14 March 2014 (UTC)

My first reaction on seeing the section was that "management" in this context is a euphemism similar to "living with," and should be replaced under WP:W2W.
I agree that it implies greater difficulty to an extent, but to me it carries a greater implication that any treatments are ineffective, which is a major problem (we need trust and compliance from patients in order to cure them, after all). For myself, that is a more important issue - as per my edit summaries, I'm fine with any number of compromises that address this (like splitting Management and Treatment into different sections) rather than being interested in making any precise distinction between the two.
In terms of definition, it seems to me that you think the term "treatment" either requires or implies that the patient is cured (or has a reasonable expectation of a cure), as in your comment above and your edit summary here - is that correct? That's contrary to my experience though - there is prophylactic treatment, chronic treatment, etc. Sunrise (talk) 07:18, 15 March 2014 (UTC)
If you wish to start a RfC regarding which to use I would have no concerns. We seem to understand the meaning of the word differently. I am against creating two sections with each term naming one. I support management, but if there is a majority that prefer treatment we can move it to that. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) (if I write on your page reply on mine) 07:26, 15 March 2014 (UTC)
I think "management" is entirely appropriate, and I agree with James that it is much better for the complex and multifacetted approach than just "treatment". A lot of cancer is "managed" by watchful waiting, and that ain't treatment. Prophylaxis is also not treatment (is a contradiction in terms). I don't see "management" as a euphemism for "living with" at all; "I'm managing" is not the same as "[my disease] is being managed". JFW | T@lk 14:47, 16 March 2014 (UTC)
I don't think that the choice is very important. Management implies a reasonably permanent need for medical attention; treatment implies that it's over and done with at some point. Some cancers (e.g., non-invasive skin cancer) is definitively treated. Others (e.g., pretty much stage 4 anything) are "managed". Probably half the cases are best described by the one term and the other half are best described by the other. As far as I'm concerned, we could flip a coin. WhatamIdoing (talk) 22:01, 16 March 2014 (UTC)
Fair enough. I won't bother taking up everyone's time with an RfC. :-) Sunrise (talk) 03:53, 20 March 2014 (UTC)


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