Talk:Canon law

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Untitled[edit]

I have one question, would anyone be able to give me one example of the canon law, like one of the main sections. Please help i am doing this for a school project. Sincerly Tiffany. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.29.65.253 (talkcontribs) 17:12, 1 February 2005

A major piece of Canon Law[edit]

Check out Gratian's Decretals, he did a lot of work in pulling different things together, reconcilling apparently contradictory information, and just putting it all together for the next 800 yrs of people to use as reference to their disputes. Hope it helps! Good Luck with it, and God Bless!! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 142.151.139.80 (talkcontribs) 02:16, 8 April 2005

Good luck indeed! It is written in Middle Ages Latin! Dave — Preceding unsigned comment added by Davescj (talkcontribs) 17:16, 8 December 2005

Example of Canon Law[edit]

This is from Vatican Canon Law online. It's on the purpose of baptism, one of the seven sacraments of the Church. Kenj0418 04:47, Apr 8, 2005 (UTC)

BAPTISM (Cann. 849 - 878)
Can. 849 Baptism, the gateway to the sacraments and necessary for salvation by actual reception or at least by desire, is validly conferred only by a washing of true water with the proper form of words. Through baptism men and women are freed from sin, are reborn as children of God, and, configured to Christ by an indelible character, are incorporated into the Church.

correction at some point[edit]

It may be worth, at some point, to delinate out the time and evolution of Canon law, which began 1140's with Gratian and goes up to the current Codex Iuris Canonici. But I am not a good enough computer guru to do it.

DAVE — Preceding unsigned comment added by Davescj (talkcontribs) 17:15, 8 December 2005

Errors[edit]

There are clear errors in the description of the history after 1900 - there is no mention about the CIC from 1917 - could somebody correct it? - I have no sources at hand. --Ioannes Pragensis 07:39, 27 March 2006 (UTC)

I caught a couple of the errors, but I don't remember all the details off hand, so I only put in teh parts that I was sure of. Where are the other Canon law students?DaveTroy 19:48, 9 June 2006 (UTC)

Some changes[edit]

I made some signficant changes. First, why there is a peroration cheerleading for the Gregorian is beyond me. There are a lot of faculties of Canon Law. Second, it is patently untrue that almost all of the cardiunals come from the Greg. Third, the Apostolic Signatura is in no way the bar" for Canon Laws -- the number of canonists who ever actually interact with the Signatura is miniscule. Cloture is a technical parliamentary term, and does not mean the same thing as "closed." Gasparri was only arguable "brilliant" and the Pope did not merely "permit" the Eastern Churches to have their own system of canon law, etc.HarvardOxon 18:39, 5 July 2006 (UTC)

Delineation, correction, self evident truth[edit]

I'm going to change the intro, adding: The Code of Canon Law is properly termed Canon Law, only in relation The Law governing The One true Holy Roman Catholic and Apostolic Church. Other codes termed, canons, gain some legitimacy, through the reader's association with the Canon Law. The Code of Canon Law is translated into English [[1]]. This is the oldest continuously functioning body of law in the world.

Hi, I removed it, sorry - because not all churches' canons have been codified, and those whose are, is different. Though, The Code of Canon Law is covered under the Roman Catholic Church section. Also, it is covered in this article: Code of Canon Law, where there is a link to the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches. :) --KGBarnett (talk) 18:42, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

Circular Definition[edit]

Canon law is defined as an ecclesiastical law, but the term ecclesiastical law redirects to canon law. Can someone who knows what either of these terms mean please explain in the lead? Thanks.--85.177.150.34 (talk) 19:52, 7 July 2008 (UTC)

Civil ecclesiastic law[edit]

There is a related branch of law which is structurally close to canon law, but which only becomes applied when the Roman Catholic Church and/or Eastern Orthodox Church is selected as the State religion. This has not happened in a long time, although it was the de facto situation in certain South American States until the late 1980s. This branch of law is called Civil ecclesiastic law, which is roughly the Christian equivalent of Sharia and/or Halakha. There is a stub here on WP-FR [2] which might be translated into WP-EN if sufficient and correct sources on the topic can be found. ADM (talk) 08:46, 13 March 2009 (UTC)

What is Canon Law?[edit]

I've read this article, along with the specific individual articles for Anglican and Roman Catholic Canon Law, and I still have no idea what the hell Canon Law actually is. Is it just the bylaws, so to speak, of the respective churches, that handle things like organizational structure and authorities? Is it there a theological component? Are the seven sacraments part of canon law? How is it established and promulgated? And so on. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.48.89.183 (talk) 23:41, 20 April 2009 (UTC)

I have added "is the body of laws and regulations made by or adopted by ecclesiastical authority, for the government of the Christian organization and its members." as definition. It is from the Catholic Encyclopedia (referenced already). It seemed to me that the old definition was incomplete and focused too much on saying churches use a form of Canon law or another rather that actually explaining what Canon law is.Amj1967 (talk) 08:16, 8 July 2009 (UTC)

Roma locuta est[edit]

Regarding the phrase Roma locuta est, it would be interesting if we could have well-sourced material explaining the origin of the phrase. ADM (talk) 09:18, 22 July 2009 (UTC)

Church rights[edit]

Another canonical concept that would need more explaining is Church rights (or the rights of the Church), which have historically been used as a basis for canon law, as well an an ecclesiastical alternative to civil rights and human rights. ADM (talk) 01:51, 30 July 2009 (UTC)

Capitalisation of pope/Pope[edit]

The Oxford Dictionary for writers and editors says at p 296 "pope cap in titles and the Pope; lower case of the office and of more than one holder". The same applies generally to bishop, cardinal, etc. Cheers, Bjenks (talk) 05:09, 20 September 2011 (UTC)

Canon law faculties and institutes[edit]

Why is this list numbered? 38.88.62.60 (talk) 21:36, 24 January 2013 (UTC)

I'm not sure. It does seem funny.
I transferred this table to the Canon law (Catholic Church) article because I thought it was far too detailed for this general article about the legal systems of many faiths. See Canon law (Catholic Church)#Canon law faculties and institutes. Canon Law Junkie §§§ Talk 00:03, 25 January 2013 (UTC)