Talk:Cape York meteorite

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Inuit reaction to the removal of the meteorite?[edit]

Is there any information concerning Inuit reaction to the removal of the Cape York Meteorite? Also, what was the reason for removing them in the first place? --Eraticus 03:42, 1 January 2006 (UTC)

I wonder this too. Foant 17:46, 8 February 2006 (UTC)
I found these sites
http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/C/Cape_York_meteorite.html
http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/expeditions/treasure_fossil/Treasures/Cape_York_Meteorite/capeyork.html?tair
it seems that with access to Western manufactured knives and tools the security of the locations of the meterorites became less important, though the sites don't dwell on the cultrul impact of having these traditional sources of metal taken away.Koonan the almost civilised 18:05, 22 July 2007 (UTC)
Surely the reason for removal was quite clear, as the article itself also makes clear - the breathtaking avarice of Robert Peary who stole them from the Iniut and sold them, for $40,000, to the American Museum of Natural History? Martinevans123 (talk) 16:28, 23 April 2011 (UTC)
Yeah, I cut that shit out. If you can come up with a way to say "breathtaking avarice" without the pathetic stench of white guilt, feel free to put it in the article. 99.108.18.12 (talk) 06:04, 19 September 2012 (UTC)
Impressive argument for deletion indeed, although a little surprised that you have only now replied. I have no guilt over that, but pure contempt. And why do you assume I am "white"? But sorry about the smell - perhaps it's the carcass of an issue that should have been properly buried years ago, but has been brushed under the carpet and left to rot. Martinevans123 (talk) 08:01, 19 September 2012 (UTC)

Iron[edit]

How did the Inuit obtain the iron and work it into tools? Are there coal deposits nearby that could be used to make a forge? PhilUK 21:53, 23 February 2006 (UTC)

I presume that the metal was cold forged into tools, with whale blubber? and cold hammered into shape, small harpoon heads and hand knives? We need coal and coke to reduce iron ore because iron exists on earth as oxides it has literally rusted with oxygen in the atmosphere. Think of these meterorites as massive ignots of nickel iron from space. The metal and tools produced was inferior to manufactured ones, a reason it seems why their location was surrendered when manufactured knives etc became available.Koonan the almost civilised 18:05, 22 July 2007 (UTC)

State of preservation[edit]

How come the fragments of this space rock did not shatter into much smaller pieces on impact? This sort of strike normally doesn't leave such big splinters - compare the Sikhote-Alin meteorite (Octahedrite, coarsest) which may have been slightly bigger than the Cape York one, and where the fracturing was far more complete. Is it because near-solid iron, as opposed to rock, would be less susceptible to blowing into a myriad of fragments? 83.254.151.33 (talk) 05:15, 22 February 2013 (UTC)

Cape York, Willamette meteorite, Mbozi meteorite, Bacubirito meteorite and Hoba meteorite are iron-nickel alloys (density c. 8), they might had a "low trajectory". Willamette meteorite, Mbozi meteorite, Bacubirito meteorite and Hoba meteorite have an aerodynamically advantageous flat form and Cape York hit ice (density 0.9167). Fractures allow a pressure build up, this might be another point. All are iron meteorites. --Chris.urs-o (talk) 06:08, 22 February 2013 (UTC)
The terminal velocity (free fall) is lower than the velocity in space/ orbit. --Chris.urs-o (talk) 07:20, 23 February 2013 (UTC)


Inuit discovery[edit]

The 1897 dates for Peary's discovery of three fragments strikes me as terribly chauvinistic. Surely Inuit knew of these fragments long before that? Can anyone justify using 1897? Cstaffa (talk) 14:13, 2 June 2013 (UTC)