Talk:Capri pants

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popular among men in many countries, especially Europe[edit]

Little wording error there, If someone who knows what they are talking about could change it it would be great.

Nicknames[edit]

I've removed those nicknames. Unless someone can show me that those are the two most popular nicknames I don't see why only those two ought to be mentioned. In addition, I've never heard either of them which I why I'm so skeptical. What's the Wikipedia policy on including nicknames? 68.173.5.219 07:12, 2 January 2007 (UTC)


Can we get a hotter picture of a woman wearing Capri pants? Seriously. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 216.165.227.226 (talk) 10:29, February 21, 2007 (UTC)

If you find a picture under a free license that better illustrates the article, feel free to add it. ShadowHalo 22:35, 22 February 2007 (UTC)

Capris vs. crop pants[edit]

This article seems to confuse or conflate two different styles of pants. The classic capri style, shown on the picture of the young girl I just found and uploaded, is the tight fit and cut just below the knee.[1] The more recent one, the one referred to as being worn by both men and women, the loose-fitting mid-calf cut, I have regularly heard referred to as "crop pants".[2]. I personally think the latter merits a separate article. But maybe we should just discuss the confusion here. Daniel Case 03:39, 2 May 2007 (UTC)

Use of term "silhouette's moniker"[edit]

The term "silhouette's moniker" is lifted from the cotton industry's web site. See [3] The map of Capri doesn't look like a pair of pants. What is a silhouette's moniker? Anthony717 17:00, 10 June 2007 (UTC)

wrong picture[edit]

moved from article space to talk page. comment added by 85.2.150.224 Joyous! | Talk 13:45, 8 July 2007 (UTC) those, on the picture, are not at all capri-pants! for real capri pants you should look at the picture of jaqueline kennedy or audrey hepburn having vacation in Capri, Italy. capri pants are always ironed in a pleat in the middle of the front and the middle of the back - they are 3/4 lenght (the one in the picture are too short!) - high waist and little "spacchi" (opening) on the side of the hem.

Citations[edit]

Please clean up this article by adding proper citations. It reeks too much of original research and editors' opinions as written. Alvis 07:33, 22 September 2007 (UTC)

Sorry, but this is something we've established through independent sources a long time ago. Please don't vandalise the article by removing sourced information. SWATJester Son of the Defender 03:02, 23 July 2008 (UTC)

Pucci Statement from March 4, 2009[edit]

I would like to cite a Pucci Statement from March 4, 2009 addressed to New York Times (Quote New York Times): "We finally heard back from Pucci representatives who in fact agree that Pucci is NOT credited with the capri pants." Sonja de Lennart, the most influential European designer after WWII, created the Capri Collection (Capri skirt, Capri blouse, Capri hat, Capri belt, Capri pants) 1945 - 1948.--Roboray (talk) 23:53, 24 May 2009 (UTC)

Where does the definition begin and end?[edit]

There seems to be some debate about the definition:

  • Short pants that end just below the knee [4]
  • Tight-fitting, calf-length women's pants, often having a slit on the outside of the leg bottoms. [5]
  • women's tight-fitting trousers [6]
  • women’s narrow pants that end just below the knee [7]
  • close-fitting women's pants that end above the ankle —called also capris [8]
  • Casual pants or trousers, usually for women, with the bottom hem reaching to below the knee but above the ankle; usually lightweight and summery. [9]
  • women's casual trousers with a tapered leg that end above the ankle and a vertical slit at the outside bottom edge. [10]
  • close-fitting tapered trousers for women. [11]

There seem to be three degrees of freedom in the definitions: fit, length and slit. I generally think of them as at least relatively tight-fitting and cut to mid-calf or just below. And I wouldn't have thought of them as typically having a slit. In any case, it doesn't feel right to call Rafael Nadal's trousers/shorts capris - even back then the ones I ever saw him in were cut to knee length or just below, still by no means mid-calf. But anyway, I guess there just isn't an exact definition.... — Smjg (talk) 14:31, 19 March 2012 (UTC)