Talk:Caribbean English

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this page is about Caribbean English, not Caribbean Creoles, and I think it should be about the (Standard) English langauge used in the Caribbean[edit]

someone insists on editting this article so it states the reality of creoles, and not English language, and also, the one editting it is not using IPA as recommened but sort of misspelled English. — Preceding unsigned comment added by KennedyBroseguini (talkcontribs) 06:44, 14 December 2012 (UTC)

The page should be something like this one http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Caribbean_English&oldid=309487197

  • Standard English
  • IPA to reflect local English pronunciation of Standard English


This article needs to be expanded.[edit]

I feel that this article needs to be expanded upon. Unfortunately, I don't know enough- yet- about dialects of Caribbean English to do it myself. Also, I have no idea who put the "hi" above. It wasn't me. Gringo300 15:06, 8 Jun 2005 (UTC)

I removed the "hi". ~ Hairouna 21:17, 6 October 2006 (UTC)

Being a Caribbean national myself, I honestly believe that more respect in the research of the Caribbean language should be shown. Why after the colonlisation and independence of these Caribbean nations has no one sought to identify or inform themselves about our wonderful islands and the language that we speak? Do we not call for the same inportance as others. I demand for all Caribben nationals the same respect. -- This unsigned comment was added by 200.50.66.98.

Link possible into US article?[edit]

In New York City (especially in eastern Brooklyn/ southern Queens) there are many speakers of Caribbean English. There must be some way we can have a cross-reference from the table on the right side of the page. (BTW, it's a nice-sounding accent.) Dogru144 19:19, 9 September 2006 (UTC)

Yeah, I realised that when I went there. There are a lotta West Indian flags and West Indians about in some parts of New York. Which US article are you talking about though? ~ Hairouna 21:17, 6 October 2006 (UTC)

Pronouns[edit]

Examples of the English in daily use in the Caribbean include a reduced set of pronouns, typically, me, we, he, she, and they (pronounced "day" or "deh").

Surely there must be a second person pronoun... --Xyzzyva 11:01, 13 November 2006 (UTC)

Yep, there is. Guettarda 23:43, 13 November 2006 (UTC)


And would it be 'you'? That seems necessary to include in an otherwise complete list of pronouns. --Xyzzyva 00:19, 14 November 2006 (UTC)
Pretty much. Guettarda 02:15, 14 November 2006 (UTC)

English itself has a reduced set of pronouns compared to Anglo-Saxon (Old English) in daily use in those days.--Jsferreira (talk) 22:02, 23 November 2007 (UTC)

Another article[edit]

The article at http://www.jstor.org/pss/454037 might be worth adding as a reference if someone with JSTOR access could do it. -- Eastmain (talk) 00:10, 23 August 2009 (UTC)

Another article[edit]

BRITISH ENGLISH/ CARIBBEAN ENGLISH[edit]

Unless things have changed dramatically since the 1980's English that is taught in school conforms to standard British English...or what used to be Standard British English. British English and Caribbean English when written and even sometimes pronounced is the same.

"The written form of the language in the former and current British West Indies conforms to spelling and grammar styles of Britain. Essentially, Caribbean English writing system is based on British English.

So technically this article needs to be renamed or more info added. What we we mean by Caribbean English...the examples on this article is probably considered "creole" and is not really standard english. Would a teacher/ headmaster (or do they say principal now?)... say..."a whay dat boy?"

While standard english is taught, written, spoken at official "places", when people head home or are on the street what they speak is considered creole. "Starbwoy (talk) 00:35, 8 July 2011 (UTC)

CARIBBEAN ENGLISH, NOT CARIBBEAN CREOLES[edit]

Shouldnt this page be about Caribbean English? Their accent and dialect in English? I think another page for caribbean creoles should be create, and this one should be for accented standard English. — Preceding unsigned comment added by KennedyBroseguini (talkcontribs) 06:42, 25 June 2012 (UTC)

Puerto Rico[edit]

Is sporadic rhoticity really a feature of the variety of English spoken in Puerto Rico?