Talk:Carrickfergus

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STRAID?[edit]

Whats Straid got to do with anything? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.190.37.235 (talk) 00:51, 28 December 2007 (UTC)


PEOPLE

Jonathan Swift lived in Kilroot, Carrickfergus and wrote A Tale of A Tub there.

The most protestant town in Ireland?[edit]

Really? I've never heard that! NotMuchToSay 23:17, 6 December 2006 (UTC)

Me neither. I've removed it altogether, although it does appear to be the town with the largest Protestant population in Northern Ireland (and probably Ireland too), so there might be some truth in it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Greatgavini (talkcontribs)

I think that is probably the most Protestant "large town" to use the official definition. Ballyclare, with a population of 8,770 is 92.3% Protestant, and Cullybackey, with 2,504 inhabitants, is 97% Protestant. Millbanks 22:33, 14 July 2007 (UTC) These figures are provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. Millbanks (talk) 10:00, 27 December 2007 (UTC)

St Nicholas Church[edit]

St Nicholas' Church is a parish church in the town of Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland. It is the oldest church in the town, built around the same time as the town's well-known castle. It is located in the centre of the town on Lancasterian Street, and holds a relatively small graveyard upon its immediate, surrounding grounds. The church is distinguished for its medieval-styled archetecture, matching that of the castle and the town's surrrounding wall, and also has a spire holding a clock, and an adjacent bell-tower. There is also an underground tunnel that leads directly into the castle, which has long been sealed up. Girlenigma (talk) 19:37, 19 February 2010 (UTC)

Too many external links[edit]

There are too many external links appearing in the body of the article, for example, the section Local churches and the section about politicians. They need to be changed to proper external links or references, per Wikipedia policy. External links should be placed in the External links section. References to websites, etc., should be placed in the References section. For further information on this please see Wikipedia:External links. Hohenloh + 23:07, 21 April 2010 (UTC)

Scots[edit]

Carrick seems to be nothing more than a truncated form of Carrickfergus. Are there any pre 1990s references available that show that Scots-speakers referred to the place exclusively as Carrick rather than Carrickfergus? Interestingly Scots-speakers certainly seemed to have referred to the place as Craigfergus[1], and what is now Belfast Lough, as Craigfergus loch[2] Carrick on the other hand, is in Scotland. 92.11.52.106 (talk) 19:17, 7 August 2011 (UTC)

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
It does seem that Craigfergus was the historical name for what is now Carrickfergus, but I can't find any reliable sources to back it up. The first one you cited proves that Lowland Scots speakers called it Craigfergus in the 17th century, but the second source isn't in Scots, as far as I can tell, just olde-worlde English, so Craigfergus may have been its old name in Scots and English. Of course, all this is speculation; not suitable for entry into an encyclopaedia. JonChappleTalk 08:48, 8 August 2011 (UTC)
The second is a first-hand account source, and as places and names where largely spelt at that time by how something sounded phonetically to the listener, Craigfergus could simply be the writters spelling of how he thought Carrickfergus was pronounced. Mabuska (talk) 10:32, 8 August 2011 (UTC)

Notable residents[edit]

Who exactly are Giselle Allen, Robert Quinn and Bronagh Kelly? DColt (talk) 18:24, 3 July 2013 (UTC)