Talk:Carya ovata

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WikiProject Plants (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
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WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

This article talk page was automatically added with {{WikiProject Food and drink}} banner as it falls under Category:Food or one of its subcategories. If you find this addition an error, Kindly undo the changes and update the inappropriate categories if needed. The bot was instructed to tagg these articles upon consenus from WikiProject Food and drink. You can find the related request for tagging here . Maximum and careful attention was done to avoid any wrongly tagging any categories , but mistakes may happen... If you have concerns , please inform on the project talk page -- TinucherianBot (talk) 01:38, 4 July 2008 (UTC)

Husking[edit]

"Don't try cracking the husk prematurely, unless you're a glutton for hard work. Rather, wait for the fruit of shagbark hickory nut trees to ripen. Ripening begins in September and October. The green, leathery husk eventually turns brown and becomes more brittle. In fact, sometimes, when the nuts fall to the ground, the husks split open into four segments, allowing access to the nut within (of course, even then, you've still got the hard outer nutshell to crack!). For this reason, some harvesters just wait until late autumn for all the nuts to fall." landscaping.about.com/od/fallfoliagetrees/a/hickory_trees_2.htm -69.87.200.171 (talk) 18:47, 3 September 2008 (UTC)

Indian history[edit]

On Aug 29, 2003, suncatcheracres from Old Town, FL wrote:[1]

"... Here's a quote from the famous plant explorer of the Southeast USA, William Bartram, who reported "ancient cultivated fields" of hickory trees growing west of now Augusta, Georgia. There is some debate as to whether Bartram is speaking of shagbark or shellbark hickories due, of course, to botanists changing, and interchanging, names for these trees over time, but the shagbark is more common than the shellbark in the area of Georgia Bartram is writing about in 1792:

"Though these are natives of the forest, yet they thrive better, and are more fruitful, in cultivated plantations, and the fruit is in great estimation with the present generation of Indians . . . The Creeks store up (the nuts) in their towns. I have seen above a hundred bushels of these nuts belonging to one family. They pound them to pieces, and then cast them into boiling water, which, after passing through fine strainers, preserves the most oily part of the liquid; this they call by a name which signifies hiccory milk; it is as sweet and rich as fresh cream, and is an ingredient in most of their cookery, especially homony and corn cakes."

The Indians also crushed the nuts with the shells in water to make a drink; used the nut oil to bake pancakes; pounded the nuts into flour; and used the nut oil on their hair."

Can someone please find some good sources to work some of this into the article? -69.87.200.171 (talk) 18:47, 3 September 2008 (UTC)