Talk:Catadioptric system

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Problem with "aperture"?[edit]

Halfblue's recent change comment: "(→Photographic catadioptric lenses - "Aperture" is the problem word since it has two meanings-- the second being "diameter" of the Objective (optics). Catadioptrics do not come in one diameter.)" essentially for the phrase "but typically lack an adjustable iris and operate at a high fixed f-number equal to the focal ratio of the total optical system" to replace "but typically has a smaller ("slower") and fixed aperture"

I don't understand. Three problems here. First, what is the other meaning you're worried about? The aperture of this system is the diameter of the objective mirror; for any such device, it is typically fixed, not variable. Second, since the topic here is photography, why introduce the astronomical term "focal ratio" where you've just said "f-number"? Third, before we agonize too much over how to say it, is this even really true? Do catadioptric 500mm lenses have smaller apertures than 500mm lenses? And if so, why?

Dicklyon 03:00, 24 October 2006 (UTC)

I have reinstated most of this. Focal Ratio is not an astronomical term, it is a standard optical term for lenses, objective lens diameter (its aperture) divided into its focal length[1]. Fountains of Bryn Mawr (talk) 04:24, 7 April 2009 (UTC)

Aberation[edit]

...And it has no color aberation, right? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 77.46.167.126 (talk) 21:39, 17 March 2009 (UTC)

Name "Maksutov"?[edit]

Moved below to talk since claim of why they are called Maksutovs in un-referenced:

(although it is commonly credited to Maksutov, as it was popularized in 1954 by the US telescope seller Questar Corporation under the name Maksutov-Cassegrain).

75.199.152.92 (talk) 20:42, 6 July 2009 (UTC)

I like your version better. I just tried to clean up previous version.Trilobitealive (talk) 03:02, 7 July 2009 (UTC)
Maksutov telescopes are called Maksutov telescopes becuase they use the specific design invented by Dmitri Maksutov (a single element auto-chromatic lens design not hit upon by Bouwers). Reworded article to fit that logical flow. Article could be reworded to beter describe these types as "meniscus" or "concentric" telescopes. More thoughts at Talk:Maksutov telescope#Maksutov and Bouwers. MrFloatingIP (talk) 03:22, 2 August 2009 (UTC)

Diagrams[edit]

This page needs more diagrams showing how the telescopes work to be comprehensible to the general public.

In what way? How a corrector works? Or how the mechanics of a Meade 8" Schmidt works? Or something in between? Fountains of Bryn Mawr (talk) 23:28, 4 April 2011 (UTC)