Talk:Catlinite

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WikiProject Indigenous peoples of North America (Rated Start-class)
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WikiProject Rocks and minerals (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
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current situation[edit]

Could someone famiiar with the topic include discussion on the current status and supply of pipestone? -FZ 22:06, 14 Jun 2005 (UTC)

American-centric article?[edit]

I'm surprised at the brief mention of what is called "pipeclay" in England. After seeing numerous different mentions of "pipeclayed belts" on redcoats uniforms and such, and just now seeing a reference in a Horatio Hornblower novel about "pipeclayed ropes", I decided to turn to the internet to find out more. All it says here is that it's a sort of white clay used to color things...yes, I had already deduced as much. I was hoping for more details...what sort of clay, how does one use it to color leather cross-belts, how often must they renew it before it wears away completely, doesn't it make a terrible mess of uniforms, turn powdery? etc. That and the name "pipeclay" given to it, suggests that (as the article says) the English use it to make pipes and such out of...why such a decided emphasis on the fact that Native Americans ALSO made pipes out of it? Both cultures used it to make pipes, the English used it as a coloring agent; an interesting note is that the pipes the Native Americans made were of religious significance. That's how I'd rank it in terms of relevance. .45Colt 22:07, 5 February 2014 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by .45Colt (talkcontribs)