Talk:Cavity magnetron

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Health hazard: electromagnetic waves or x-rays ??[edit]

At the end of the paragraph on radar (application), it says that magnetrons could pose a health risk because of their "electromagnetic radiation". Shouldn't it say "x-rays" (which magnetrons inadvertently also produce)? Otherwise (as mentioned in the last sentence) newer radars which replace the magnetron with solid state electronics wouldn't be any safer...? Greetings, 85.3.83.62 (talk) 20:52, 3 November 2010 (UTC)

We need a more-typical illustration (or a few)[edit]

I'm a retired electronic tech, with Navy radar experience, and a lifelong interest in electronics.

There are a few pertinent Wikimedia images, apparently all for non-English-language Wikipedia sites, such as [1]

Primarily, however, I called up Google images for magnetrons, and found a "lot" of them, many for microwave ovens, or similar, and also magnetron sputtering equipment (another Wikipedia article to be written?). How I do wish that copyright owners would/could release these images!

  • There's an excellent image, Fig 13, in the notably-good article (written by a Russian?) at

[2]

  • Please see also (several photos here):

[3] That's my idea of a traditional magnetron. The bright square in the middle is the flange for the rectangular waveguide that carries the microwaves to (typically) a radar antenna. That site, [4], has a search arrangement; you have to select "Magnetron" in the right search field to get a list of magnetron images, linked by their type numbers. I looked at some, and a good number are without their magnets. The CV series, of which there are many, are British.

The magnetron on the left is an early version of a traditional (X-band) radar magnetron. The horn-shaped structures are the field magnet, most likely alnico. The glass structure at the top has the connections for the cathode heater; they also provide the high-voltage negative pulsed operating power. The magnetron is inside a display case, which explains the bright white dots from the camera's flash.

  • Another good one; this is a modern one with integral horseshoe magnets.

[6]

  • Historic, with magnets:

[7]

  • Cavity magnetron anode:

[8]

  • Navy training series, with a few illustrations:

[9]

  • Present-day magnetrons — Small, but good images:

[10]

  • Vane-type anode (still essentially like a cavity magnetron), "strapped" to improve performance (less frequency shift during a pulse? I need to do some homework):

[11]

  • General illustration, and different types of anode cavities:

[12]

  • Original cavity magnetron anode, apparently:

[13]

Regards, (Nikevich; I somehow [mis]managed to log out...) 173.48.76.50 (talk) 11:54, 5 November 2010 (UTC)

I have changed this paragraph from "In a conventional vacuum tube, electrons are emitted from a heated cathode and are attracted to the anode due to the different electrical charge placed on the two plates. The components are normally arranged in line, at opposite ends of the tube, giving them their traditional cylindrical shape. In a diode the current can flow only from the cathode to the anode, providing rectification. A triode adds a control grid which allows the flow of current to be further controlled in magnitude as well as direction, and thereby provides an amplification function." to ...

"In a conventional vacuum tube, electrons are emitted from a heated cathode and are attracted to the anode as it is positive with respect to the cathode. The components are normally arranged concentrically, with the cathode at the centre, giving them their traditional cylindrical shape. In vacuum tubes (valves), the current can flow only from the cathode to the anode, providing rectification although this function is usually performed by the diode. A triode adds a control grid which allows the flow of current to be further controlled in magnitude, and thereby provides an amplification function." to remove some inaccuracies and make it more concise.SUPERHETRODYNE (talk) 18:43, 15 November 2014 (UTC)

"The CV series, of which there are many, are British." - the 'CV' stands for 'common valve' and was the standard British designation for thermionic valves (vacuum tubes) at the time. The designation was used as a cover for the magnetron so as to fit in with normal valve designations as might be recovered by the Germans from aircraft wreckage.

synchrotron radiation[edit]

So in this article under Microwave source, it says the effect is known as synchrotron radiation. However I have not found any source that coincides with this. Because I am not familiar with radiation I cannot add a citation needed, but from what I gather I believe the radiation to be cyclotron radiation and not synchrotron radiation, but again, I am not overly familiar with the subject so I could be wrong. I would like this to be reviewed by someone who can provide a source. Thanks :) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Accusedbold (talkcontribs) 08:21, 17 March 2015 (UTC)