Talk:Cerebral aqueduct

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Move to cerebral aqueduct[edit]

I've moved this page from Mesencephalic duct to Cerebral aqueduct. Cerebral aqueduct is used far more often than mesencephalic duct in the texts I've come across (e.g. Barr's The Human Nervous System: An anatomical viewpoint) and Google reports a usage of 10:1 in favor of cerebral aqueduct as well. --David Iberri (talk) 16:43, 8 January 2006 (UTC)

Coronal or transverse plane[edit]

Look at the first (left side) two images in the image gallery; they show the same view but the captions disagree re which plane, coronal plane or transverse plane. --Una Smith (talk) 05:39, 27 November 2007 (UTC)

This confusion arises from the presence of the "cephalic flexure" in humans, which is the kink in the central nervous system that results in the forebrain being turned ~90 degrees relative to the rest of the CNS. This was, obviously, a necessary adjustment with the evolution of upright bipedalism, to keep our eyes pointed forward when we started walking on two legs! In the first image, "coronal" is being used with respect to the nervous system, while for the second image, "transverse" is being used with respect to the (human) body orientation, i.e., a plane parallel to the ground. Both are correct and frankly, I can't decide which to change for consistency's sake, in part because the page for anatomical terms of location, and particularly the section on planes of section, is a total mess. I'll try to work on that! PhineasG (talk) 20:54, 30 August 2011 (UTC)